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Thursday 09 March 2017

Journal of Economic Geography : CEP Journal Articles

‘Agglomeration externalities and urban growth controls’, Wouter Vermeulen, Journal of Economic Geography Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2017

http://bit.ly/2n719tK

Related publications

Agglomeration Externalities and Urban Growth Controls Wouter Vermeulen, SERC/Urban and Spatial Programme Discussion Paper No.093, October 2011

Related links

Wouter Vermeulen webpage:  https://www.cpb.nl/medewerkers/wouter-vermeulen

‘Urban renewal after the Berlin Wall: a place-based policy evaluation’, Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Wolfgang Maennig and Felix J. Richter, Journal of Economic Geography Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2017

http://bit.ly/2n7160U

Related links

Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=10268

‘Innovation, SMEs and the liability of distance: the demand and supply of bank funding in UK peripheral regions’, Neil Lee and Ross Brown, Journal of Economic Geography Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2017

http://bit.ly/2mqOC0P

Related links

Neil Lee webpage:  http://www.lse.ac.uk/geographyAndEnvironment/whosWho/staff%20profiles/NLee.aspx

 


Related Links:
Journal of Economic Geography - CEP Journal Articles

Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage



Tuesday 07 March 2017

The Daily Telegraph: Call for statistics to measure quality of economic growth

National figures on economic growth fail to take into account of regional variations and ignore quality of life, such as the gap in life expectancy between Surrey and the north east of England, the Inclusive Growth Commission warned.

Local productivity, local incomes, the distribution of earnings, pay changes for the lowest paid and levels of regional economic inactivity could all form part of this new inclusive growth metric, said the ICG which is chaired by Stephanie Flanders, JP Morgan’s chief market strategist. The Commission also includes former Rolls-Royce chief executive Sir John Rose and London School of Economics professor Henry Overman.


Related Links:
The Daily Telegraph - Call for statistics to measure quality of economic growth

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 06 March 2017

LSE Business Review: The roles of nature and history in world development

A study on how the relative importance of a place’s suitability for agriculture and trade has changed over time, by Vernon Henderson, Tim Squires, Adam Storeygard and David Weil

Related publications

This article summarises ‘The Global Spatial Distribution of Economic Activity: Nature, History and the Role of Trade’ by Vernon Henderson, Tim Squires, Adam Storeygard and David Weil, SERC/Urban and Spatial Programme Discussion Paper No. 198, May 2016

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0198.pdf

 


Related Links:
LSE Business Review - The roles of nature and history in world development

The roles of nature and history in world development

Vernon Henderson webpage



Saturday 04 March 2017

CEP Engagement/In politics: CEP and its research had a broad reach in Parliament during the month of February.

During the passage of the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill in the Lords, research on the benefits from immigration at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) was mentioned.

Also, LSE research was picked up during debates on building more homes (Professor Cheshire)

pre-school education: teachers (Dr Jo Blanden, Professor Sandra McNally).

LSE has been particularly involved in the debate on Brexit through its submissions of written evidence in Parliament and academics appearing before select committees. LSE has responded to the Impact of Brexit on Higher Education and the Immigration inquiries.

Swati Dhingra and Professor Niamh Moloney gave their insights on UK Trade Options Beyond 2019

Professor Alan Manning and Philippe Legrain informed the Lords on Brexit and the Labour Market.

Related links

Community Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/Community/default.asp

 

 


Related Links:
Paul Cheshire webpage

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Alan Manning webpage



Saturday 04 March 2017

Yibada (English Chinese News, USA): China's high-speed rail technology game: the significant role of transfer deals

Yatang Lin, a researcher from the Centre for Economic Performance of the London School of Economics, enthused that "there were ambitions to get everything done pretty quickly. Of course, there were political motives there. Therefore, the fastest and safest way was to use foreign technology."


Related Links:
Yibada (English Chinese News, USA) - China's high-speed rail technology game: the significant role of transfer deals

High-speed rail in China

High-speed rail in China

High-speed rail in China

Yatang Lin webpage



Tuesday 28 February 2017

LSE academic mentioned in Parliament: Building more homes

During the debate on 'Building more homes' in the Economic Affairs Committee, Lord Layard mentioned LSE:

"Professor Cheshire at the London School of Economics has suggested a levy on the final value of a completed development, combining that with the change in presumption that I referred to earlier. There are many areas in which these ideas can be explored. The committee took no view on these issues but it made a clear recommendation that the Government should examine these proposals."

 

Related links

Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=cheshire

Richard Layard webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=970

 


Related Links:
LSE academic mentioned in Parliament - Building more homes

Paul Cheshire webpage

Richard Layard webpage



Tuesday 31 January 2017

Vox: On the spatial distribution of development: the roles of nature and history

Economists point to three factors to explain how population is distributed: geographical characteristics, agglomeration, and history. This column, taken from a new Vox eBook, examines how economic and technological development have changed the ways in which two first-nature characteristics – suitability for growing food and suitability for engaging in trade – impact population distribution. 

This column first appeared as a chapter in the Vox eBook, The Long Economic and Political Shadow of History, Volume 1, available to download here.


Related Links:
Vox - On the spatial distribution of development: the roles of nature and history

Vernon Henderson webpage



Tuesday 24 January 2017

El Periodico: Autora de in informe sobre el impacto de las grandes superficies

Maria Sanchez Vidal: "the coexistence between Commerce of proximity and large surfaces trade is possible"

Is author of a study on the effect of the introduction of superstores in respect of a city trade.

Related publications  'Small shops for sale! The effects of big-box openings on grocery stores', Maria Sanchez, SERC & IEB mimeo

 


Related Links:
El Periodico - Autora de in informe sobre el impacto de las grandes superficies

Maria Sanchez webpage



Wednesday 04 January 2017

The Planner: Housing professionals recognised in New Year's Honours

Paul Cheshire, economist and emeritus professor of economic geography at the LSE, has been awarded a CBE for services to economics and housing.


Related Links:
The Planner - Housing professionals recognised in New Year's Honours

Paul Cheshire webpage



Saturday 31 December 2016

Daily Mirror: New Year's Honours 2017: Full list of great and good awarded for services to Britain

Professor Paul Charles Cheshire. Economist. For services to Economics and Housing. (London)

Professor John Van Reenen. Economist. For services to Economics and Public Policy Making. (Abroad)


Related Links:
Daily Mirror - New Year's Honours 2017: Full list of great and good awarded for services to Britain

Paul Cheshire webpage

John Van reenen webpage



Saturday 31 December 2016

LSE News: New Year Honours at LSE

Paul Cheshire, Emeritus Professor of Economic Geography, was awarded a CBE for Services to Economics and Housing.

In 2004 Professor Cheshire won the Royal Economic Society's Prize for the best paper in the Economic Journal and won the European Regional Science Association/European investment Banks prize for lifetime contribution to regional science research in 2009. He is an elected Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences and of the Weimer School.

Aside from his academic work he has spent time as an advisor and as a consultant for the European Commission, the World Bank, the OECD, the UN and other international organisations as well as the UK government, including being a member of the Expert Panel for the Barker Review of the Planning system.

Also receiving an honour was long-serving former member of LSE staff, Professor John Van Reenen, awarded an OBE for services to economics and pubic policy making. Until summer 2016 Professor Van Renen was Director of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (CEP). He is currently Professor of Applied Economics at MIT and remains an associate at CEP.


Related Links:
LSE News - New Year Honours at LSE

Brexit: the final assessment

Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning

Paul Cheshire webpage

John Van reenen webpage



Friday 30 December 2016

Guardian: Housing leaders recognised in New Year Honours list

Five housing executives and a professor of economics and housing policy have been awarded medals in the New Year honours list.

Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, receives a CBE for services to economics and housing. Cheshire has written extensively on planning issues, land use and regulation, and mixed communities.


Related Links:
Guardian - Housing leaders recognised in New Year Honours list

Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning

Paul Cheshire webpage



Friday 30 December 2016

The Daily Telegraph: Former PWC boss knighted in New Year's Honours

Professor John Van Reenen, who predicted ahead of the referendum that Brexit would cost up to £1,700 per household per year, has been given an OBE for services to economics and public policy making. Other academics to receive honours include Professor Paul Cheshire, who has argued that the green belt should be opened up to ease the housing crisis. He will receive a CBE in the honours, which are recognising 1,197 people in total.


Related Links:
The Daily Telegraph - Former PWC boss knighted in New Year's Honours

BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance

Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning

Paul Cheshire webpage

John Van reenen webpage



Friday 30 December 2016

Bloomberg: Tennis No. 1 Murray, Kinks frontman knighted in UK Honors List

A total of 1,197 people, representing “the very best of our nation,” were granted awards, according to a statement from the Cabinet Office. Just over half are women, 9.3 percent are from ethnic minorities, and 8.5 percent have some form of disability, making the list “the most diverse ever,” it said.

Other notable awards include:

CBE for London School of Economics professor Paul Cheshire.

OBE for and MIT economics professor John Van Reenen


Related Links:
Bloomberg - Tennis No. 1 Murray, Kinks frontman knighted in UK Honors List

Paul Cheshire webpage

John Van reenen webpage



Friday 16 December 2016

LSE Business Review blog: Fear of fracking affects house prices in the UK

Shale gas offers the prospect of a low-cost energy future, but invokes fears of environmental catastrophe, write Stephen Gibbons, Stephan Heblich, Esther Lho and Christopher Timmins


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - Fear of fracking affects house prices in the UK

In brief... Fear of fracking: the impact on UK house prices



Friday 02 December 2016

The Daily Telegraph: Half measures won't solve the housing crisis

Paul Cheshire, Professor of Economic Geography at the London School of Economics is a longstanding critic of Britain’s byzantine planning system.

[No link]


Related Links:
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning

Paul Cheshire webpage



Monday 14 November 2016

BBC Radio 4: Evening programme

Martin Knapp is here. Professor of social policy at .. depression, anxiety, bullies themselves never seem to be affected. Professor thank you very much we’ve had a lot of emails on this…

The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4 on November 14, 2016
Link to the interview here

Related publication

Childhood bullying victimization is associated with use of mental health services over five decades: a longitudinal nationally representative cohort study, S. Evans-Lacko, R. Takizawa, No. Brimblecombe, D. King, M. Knapp, B. Maugham and L. Arsenault, Psychological Medicine, first view, Kenneth S. Kendler and Robin M. Murray (Eds), November 2016


Related Links:
BBC Radio 4 - Evening programme

Martin Knapp webpage

Sara Evans-lacko webpage



Tuesday 01 November 2016

The National (Scotland): Letters II: Trump's destruction of a priceless treasure is his Scottish legacy

Trump’s true legacy will be that of rural vandalism on a colossal scale. A unique wilderness at Menie destroyed for a golf course. This was a site of Special Scientific Interest, the highest environmental accolade. A dynamic dune system, wetlands, trees and shrubs gone forever.

 

Opposition to the destruction of this priceless landscape came from the RSPB, SEPA, SNH, Ramblers Association and the SWT. No credible environmental organisation supported Trump. Add to this the harassment of local residents, heavy handed policing and the challenges made to our planning regulations. Martin Ford, Scottish Green Party councillor, correctly made the point that Trump “has in turn either bullied or ignored the Scottish planning system”.

 

The economic benefits were also vastly overestimated. The Scottish Government was duped by the estimates given in the economic impact study. Incredibly, this document, a well-crafted piece of sophistry, was not scrutinised properly by the Scottish Government. In 2008, Alex Salmond said that “we can see the social and economic benefits: 6000 jobs across Scotland, 1400 local and permanent jobs here in the north east of Scotland that outweighs the environmental concerns”. At the time, Professor Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics questioned the number of local jobs that would be created. This has become all too true. No golf “resort” was ever built, nor, thankfully, the second golf course. The 450-bedroom hotel and 1500 houses have also not appeared.


Related Links:
The National (Scotland) - Letters II: Trump's destruction of a priceless treasure is his Scottish legacy

Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning

Paul Cheshire webpage



Wednesday 19 October 2016

The Conversation: Why do wind farms drag down house prices in some places but not others?

Two years ago, the London School of Economics delivered bad news to the renewables industry. It published a research paper that showed that house price appreciation was significantly reduced by being near wind farms in England and Wales. This overturned previous work in both the US and UK which had found no robust evidence of a negative effect.

This article was published online by The Conversation on October 19, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices, Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014
Gone with the Wind, Stephen Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Urban and Spatial Programme webpage



Friday 14 October 2016

The Independent: Brexit: UK faces £350m-a-week ‘divorce bill' as result of leaving the EU

Economist Thomas Sampson told The Independent: ''It's important to remember that the exit bill would be a one-off payment and in the longer run it is likely to be dwarfed by the broader economic costs resulting from reduced integration with EU markets, particularly if the government pursues a hard Brexit.''

This article was published by The Independent on October 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit: the impact on UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 1, Summer 2016
The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards, CEP Brexit Analysis No. 2 by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, March 2016

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Saturday 01 October 2016

The Economist: Free exchange: Down to earth

Brexiteers need to respect gravity models of international trade
Furthermore, according to Swati Dhingra of the London School of Economics, gravity models do a good job of predicting actual trading relationships today.

This article was published in The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage



Saturday 24 September 2016

Vox: Distinctively different: a new approach to valuing architectural amenities

Article by Gabriel Ahlfeldt and Nancy Holman
Good architectural design is a public good, but economists and policymakers lack robust evidence on the impact of well designed architecture on location value when planning spaces. This column verifies the worth of preserving and designing good architectural spaces by analysing the changes in property prices across conservation and non-conservation areas in England. It finds that good design in buildings has a substantial positive impact on location value.

This article was published online by Vox on September 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Distinctively Different: A New Approach to Valuing Architectural Amenities, Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt and Nancy Holman, SERC/Urban Programme Discussion Paper No.171, February 2015

Related links
Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Saturday 24 September 2016

The Economist: Little Londons

However, land regulation may play a bigger role. According to a recent paper by Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen of the London School of Economics, alongside Greater London, scarcity of open, developable land is greatest in and around Birmingham and Manchester.

This article was published in The Economist on September 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, Christian A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, SERC/Urban Programme Discussion Paper No.119, September 2012

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 22 September 2016

Handelsblatt: Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 22 September 2016

Handelsblatt: Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 22 September 2016

Handelsblatt: Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 22 September 2016

Handelsblatt: Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Friday 26 August 2016

Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway): Do we need more goals for society than economic growth?

Therefore, among others, economics professor Richard Layard of the London School of Economics urged to measure citizens' quality of life. OECD har i den såkalte «Bedre liv-indeksen» utarbeidet indikatorer på en rekke områder fra sysselsetting og bolig til frivillig aktivitetsliv og miljø, for å forsøke å måle livskvalitet i ulike land. OECD in the so-called "better life index" compiled indicators on a range of areas from employment and housing to volunteer aktivitetsliv and environment, in an attempt to measure quality of life in different countries. KrF fremmet forslag i Stortinget i 2009 om at også Norge burde gjøre dette. KrF proposed in Parliament in 2009 that also Norway should do this. Dette har resultert i en omtale av livskvalitetsindikatorer i Nasjonalbudsjettet. This has resulted in a review of quality of life indicators in the National Budget.

This article appeared on Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway) on 26 August 2016 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Friday 26 August 2016

Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway): Do we need more goals for society than economic growth?

Therefore, among others, economics professor Richard Layard of the London School of Economics urged to measure citizens' quality of life. OECD har i den såkalte «Bedre liv-indeksen» utarbeidet indikatorer på en rekke områder fra sysselsetting og bolig til frivillig aktivitetsliv og miljø, for å forsøke å måle livskvalitet i ulike land. OECD in the so-called "better life index" compiled indicators on a range of areas from employment and housing to volunteer aktivitetsliv and environment, in an attempt to measure quality of life in different countries. KrF fremmet forslag i Stortinget i 2009 om at også Norge burde gjøre dette. KrF proposed in Parliament in 2009 that also Norway should do this. Dette har resultert i en omtale av livskvalitetsindikatorer i Nasjonalbudsjettet. This has resulted in a review of quality of life indicators in the National Budget.

This article appeared on Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway) on 26 August 2016 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Wednesday 17 August 2016

PropertyWire: Researcher blames government not rich foreign buyers for UK housing crisis

Decades of planning policies that constrain the supply of houses and land and turn them into something like gold or artworks is to blame for the current housing crisis in the UK rather than foreign buyers, according to a new analysis. The problem is not foreign speculators buying luxury flats as an investment in London which then lie empty but that for more than 30 years not enough homes have been built, says Paul Cheshire, Professor Emeritus of economic geography at the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by PropertyWire on August 17, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Tuesday 16 August 2016

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam): Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Tuesday 16 August 2016

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam): Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Tuesday 16 August 2016

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam): Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Tuesday 16 August 2016

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam): Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Wednesday 10 August 2016

BBC Radio 4: Paul Cheshire interview

Paul Cheshire argues that golf courses capitalise on green belt planning laws which keep down land prices and contribute to a housing shortage.

The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4 on August 10, 2016
Link to the interview herer

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014 Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Tuesday 02 August 2016

SchoolDash blog: Poverty of opportunity?

Education is not just a vital cornerstone of our culture and economy, it is also potentially one of the great social levellers. However rich or poor our parents, however supportive or dysfunctional our families, a high-quality education ought to give each of us the opportunity to live a fulfilling life limited only by our own talents and efforts rather than by the circumstances of our birth. Or so the theory goes. In this post we look at the question of economic deprivation among children, and in particular how different types of schools either enable or hinder opportunities for those from poorer families. ... The rest of this post looks at these trends in more detail. You may also be interested to see other related work such as the Sutton Trust's recent analysis of social selection in primary schools, Ofsted's 2013 report on underachievement among poor pupils, and the LSE's 2012 research into the effects of schools on house prices.

This article was published online by the SchoolDash blog on August 2, 2016
Link to article here

CEP research on Twitter
Lilian Greenwood @LilianGreenwood (Labour MP for Nottingham)
RT @emranmian: On grammar schools and social mobility ... @SchoolDash work from last week is pretty damning

Related publications
The link between schools and house prices is now an established fact, Stephen Gibbons, LSE British Politics and Policy blog, September 25, 2012
Big ideas: valuing schooling through house prices, Stephen Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012
Houses and Schools: Valuation of School Quality through the Housing Market, EALE 2010 Pressidential Address, Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Monday 01 August 2016

Vox: Brexit Beckons: Thinking ahead by leading economists

The June 2016 Brexit referendum saw British voters reject membership of the European Union. Now that a decision has been made, it is time to look forward and find the best solutions for the future of both the UK and the EU. This VoxEU eBook regroups the views of more than a dozen leading economists and specialists on a broad range of issues, from various perspectives.

Trade policy and the City

5. The UK's new trade priorities
Angus Armstrong

6. UK-EU relations after Brexit: What is best for the UK economy?
Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson

This article was published by Vox on 1 August 2016
Link to article here

Related articles
Vox on August 1, 2016
A new eBook: Brexit beckons
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Series Paper No.01, February 2016
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.
Brexit and Wage Inequality, Brian Bell and Stephen Machin, CEP Brexit Blog, July 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage

Brian Bell webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Stephen Machin webpage
Barbara Petrongolo webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Saturday 16 July 2016

Admin5.com (China): Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms
That is to say, technical parts of the economy made great contribution to productivity growth. In 2015 a 17-country study found that between 1993 and 2007, average annual GDP growth rate of the robot industry for these countries has contributed 0.4%, this time the national GDP growth rate of more than one-tenth (Graetz and Michaels 2015).

This article was published online by Admin5.com (China) on July 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Wednesday 13 July 2016

Business Day Live: Are economists at fault for Brexit?

John van Reenen, the outgoing director of the London School of Economics’s Centre for Economic Performance, doesn’t think the profession should be too down on itself. Had economists engaged more "in my frank view, it would not have made a jot of difference".

This article appeared in Business Day Live on 13 July. Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth webpage

Thursday 07 July 2016

Independent.IE (Ireland): Capital needs cheaper homes, not higher debts

There is another house price bubble under way in the Dublin area. Notwithstanding the efforts by the Central Bank to keep mortgage credit under control, some extraordinary prices have been quoted recently for the small parcels of land that become available. ...
Two researchers at the London School of Economics, Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, have just released a paper in The Economic Journal looking at the development of house prices in the United Kingdom in recent decades and the role played by planning restrictions.

This article was re-published online by the Independent.ie (Ireland) on July 7, 2016. It was originally published on 17/04/2016.
Link to article here

Related article
April 10, 2016
Vox
Regulation is to blame for England's surge in house prices, Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen

Related publications
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, C. A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, Economic Journal 126(591): 358–405, March 2016.
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, Christian A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, Urban Programme [SERC] Discussion Paper No.119, September 2012

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Wednesday 06 July 2016

Planning and Building Control Today: The UK planning system - fit for purpose?

Article by Christian Hilber
In the first of a two-part article discussing the British planning system, Christian Hilber, Associate Professor of Economic Geography at the London School of Economics, argues that the UK planning system has serious flaws and delivers benefits only at excessively high costs, mainly hurting the young.

There is no denial: the UK faces a serious housing affordability crisis. This crisis is not a short-term phenomenon, nor the result of a financial bubble. The crisis has been brewing for several decades. Over the last 45 years, house price growth in the UK has been faster in real terms than in any other OECD country and has far outstripped earnings growth. Normally when demand is rising, construction booms as well and that eases price growth. This has not happened in the UK; construction of new housing has been decreasing more or less steadily since the late 1960s from 353k units in 1968 to 118k units in 2014, leading to a very substantial and ever-growing housing shortfall. Not only that; newly built homes are also about 40 percent smaller than in similarly densely populated European countries.

In the Greater London Area (GLA) the problem is particularly acute. To illustrate this, the average house price in the GLA has gone up by £65.2k year-on-year since March 2015. The latest average household income estimate for the capital for 2013 is £51.8k. Put differently, last year, the average London homeowner earned more from capital gains than a renter from working all year long. It is, therefore, no surprise that young adults without wealthy parents are increasingly priced out from getting onto the owner-occupied housing ladder. Renting in the private sector is similarly unaffordable, so the young - even the highly skilled - increasingly have no other option but to stay at their parents' home longer or leave the city. Consistent with this, the share of those employed in inner London working in professional scientific, research, engineering and technology jobs has fallen since 2011, hurting the capital's productivity. The housing affordability crisis is an economic as well as a social problem.

This article was published by Planning and Building Control Today on July 6, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Christian Hilber CEP Publications webpage



Friday 24 June 2016

La Izquierda Diario (Spanish): El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Friday 24 June 2016

La Izquierda Diario (Spanish): El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Thursday 09 June 2016

LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog: Scenarios of a new UK-EU relationship: A 'soft' Brexit

What consequences will Britain's EU referendum have for both the UK and the rest of Europe? In a series of papers published as a collaboration between EUROPP and CIDOB (the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs), LSE authors analyse the prospects for three scenarios - a Bremain, a 'soft' Brexit and a 'harsh' Brexit. Swati Dhingra discusses what would happen in the case of a 'soft' Brexit, which is defined as the UK exiting the EU without a significant deterioration in relations between Britain and other EU countries. The full papers are available here.

This article was published online by LSE's EUROPP - European Politics and Policy - blog on June 9, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance, Holger Breinlich, Swati Dhingra, Saul Estrin, Hanwei Huang, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.08, June 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK’s options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.01, February 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Monday 06 June 2016

Morning Star: UPDATE: 5 arguments in favor of a U.K. 'Brexit' from the EU -- and 5 against

U.K. shoppers save 350 pounds a year, or about $511, thanks to lower prices that come from being part of the EU. That's according to the remain campaign, which cites London School of Economics data

This article appeared in the Morning Star on 6 June 2016. Link to article

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


Sunday 29 May 2016

lenabellina blog: That'll do, chimps

The second programme I heard and was inspired by was this week's Radio 4 'All in the Mind'. The key messages here also chimed with much of my own thinking about the purpose of education, the pressures created by assessment in schools and the need to focus on wellbeing in schools. The programme included a discussion around tests and exams and the mental health of children which involved Lord Layard from The London School of Economics, Dr Berry Billingsley, Associate Professor of Science Education and Reading University and her colleague Tim Williams who is a clinical and educational psychologist. ... Lord Richard Layard who directs the Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics then spoke about a project called 'Healthy Mind' which is working with 30 schools around London to try and get data in relation to this issue. Hs opening statement: ''We are trying to help people learn how to live and not just how to pass exams.''

This article was published online on the lenabellina blog on May 29, 2016
Link to article here

Related broadcast
The full BBC Radio 4 'All in the Mind' Episode can be found here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



Sunday 29 May 2016

lenabellina blog: That'll do, chimps

The second programme I heard and was inspired by was this week's Radio 4 'All in the Mind'. The key messages here also chimed with much of my own thinking about the purpose of education, the pressures created by assessment in schools and the need to focus on wellbeing in schools. The programme included a discussion around tests and exams and the mental health of children which involved Lord Layard from The London School of Economics, Dr Berry Billingsley, Associate Professor of Science Education and Reading University and her colleague Tim Williams who is a clinical and educational psychologist. ... Lord Richard Layard who directs the Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics then spoke about a project called 'Healthy Mind' which is working with 30 schools around London to try and get data in relation to this issue. Hs opening statement: ''We are trying to help people learn how to live and not just how to pass exams.''

This article was published online on the lenabellina blog on May 29, 2016
Link to article here

Related broadcast
The full BBC Radio 4 'All in the Mind' Episode can be found here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



Wednesday 18 May 2016

CityLab: The complex relationship between data and cities

There's been no shortage of hype about the relationship between cities and data, especially so-called big data. For large numbers of tech companies, cities, and even a growing number of urbanists, data promises to solve all manner of urban problems, from predictive policing to improving traffic flow to promoting energy efficiency. An even bigger potential role for new kinds of data lies in helping researchers and policy-makers better understand how cities and neighborhoods grow and evolve - but only if done right.
Not all data from new sources qualifies as ''big data'', which - as its name implies - refers to truly massive amounts of information. Max Nathan of the London School of Economics breaks down actual big data into three key categories: internet data from sites like Yelp, Twitter, or Google and other commercial data, government-sponsored data collected by cities or towns, and Census and related data.

This article was published online by CityLab on May 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Mapping Digital Businesses with Big Data: some early findings from the UK, Max Nathan and Anna Rosso, Research Policy, 44(9), November 2015.

Related links
Max Nathan webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Wednesday 18 May 2016

The Financial Times: Number of EU nationals working in UK reaches record level

Jane Collins, employment spokesman for the pro-Brexit United Kingdom Independence party, said the 2.1m EU nationals working in Britain were ''a huge boon to multinational companies who can exploit the oversupply of labour to keep their wages low.'' However, John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, rebuffed that argument and said workers would suffer badly in the event of Brexit. ''There is no evidence that EU immigration does much harm to the jobs or pay of British people. By contrast, Brexit will inflict major damage on the real wages of ordinary workers by damaging trade, investment and productivity.''

This article was published by The Financial Times on May 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.05, May 2016
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Wednesday 18 May 2016

The Financial Times: Number of EU nationals working in UK reaches record level

Jane Collins, employment spokesman for the pro-Brexit United Kingdom Independence party, said the 2.1m EU nationals working in Britain were ''a huge boon to multinational companies who can exploit the oversupply of labour to keep their wages low.'' However, John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, rebuffed that argument and said workers would suffer badly in the event of Brexit. ''There is no evidence that EU immigration does much harm to the jobs or pay of British people. By contrast, Brexit will inflict major damage on the real wages of ordinary workers by damaging trade, investment and productivity.''

This article was published by The Financial Times on May 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.05, May 2016
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Wednesday 18 May 2016

The Financial Times: Number of EU nationals working in UK reaches record level

Jane Collins, employment spokesman for the pro-Brexit United Kingdom Independence party, said the 2.1m EU nationals working in Britain were ''a huge boon to multinational companies who can exploit the oversupply of labour to keep their wages low.'' However, John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, rebuffed that argument and said workers would suffer badly in the event of Brexit. ''There is no evidence that EU immigration does much harm to the jobs or pay of British people. By contrast, Brexit will inflict major damage on the real wages of ordinary workers by damaging trade, investment and productivity.''

This article was published by The Financial Times on May 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.05, May 2016
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Wednesday 11 May 2016

CEP State of Working Britain blog: SWOB 10: EU-turn if you want to. Brexit and immigration

State of Working Britain blog, article posted by Jonathan Wadsworth
Immigration has for some years been the uppermost worry among the issues thought to be facing Britain in many opinion polls so it - or rather people's perceptions of its extent and its effects - is almost certainly one of the key issues that will influence the upcoming vote on whether to stay or remain in the EU. A new report from the CEP looks into this. Workers have had a rough ride in recent times. Real (inflation adjusted) wages fell by around 10% in the years after the global financial crisis of 2008 and the ensuing austerity. Such a sustained fall in pay is unprecedented in British post-war history.

This article was posted online in the CEP State of Working Britain blog on May 11, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Jonathan Wadsworth, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Series No.5, May 2016

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
The State of Working Britain blog webpage



Saturday 30 April 2016

The Economist: The grip tightens

There is enough green-belt land in Greater London to build 1.6m houses at average densities, says Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics (LSE) - about 30 times the number of new houses London needs a year. But opposition from homeowners is strong - especially from those near the green belt, who do not much like the thought of newcomers bringing down property prices. ... A plethora of other regulations also block development. By one count there are ten protected views of St Paul's Cathedral, including one from a specific oak tree on Hampstead Heath. This imposes severe restrictions on building height across the city. Population density in central London is about half New York's. According to Mr Cheshire and Christian Hilber, also of the LSE, restrictive planning policies inflate the price of office space in the West End by about 800%. A square foot there is twice as expensive as in midtown Manhattan.

This article was published by The Economist on April 30, 2016 Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Wednesday 27 April 2016

The New York Times: OECD's Gurria-No Economic Upside for UK from Brexit

The head of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development said on Wednesday that he saw no potential benefits for the British economy if voters decide to leave the European Union at a referendum in June. Angel Gurria said a new OECD report showed a hit to British economic growth under all scenarios if the country left the EU compared with a decision to stay in the bloc. ''The best outcome is still worse than remaining and the worst outcomes are very bad indeed,'' he said in a speech at the London School of Economics as the OECD published its report on the impact of a so-called Brexit.

This article was published online by The New York Times on April 27, 2016
Link to article here

CEP Event details
CEP Public Lecture on April 27, 2016: 'To Brexit or not to Brexit: a taxing question' given by Angel Gurria, Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Moderator: Dr Thomas Sampson; Chair: Professor Lord Stern.
Download the speech here

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Monday 25 April 2016

The Economist: London's property woes are getting worse

Poor land-use regulation is the main reason for Londons crazy prices. Two problems stand out. ... There is enough green-belt land in Greater London to build 1.6m houses at average densities, says Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics (LSE) - about 30 times the number of new houses London needs annually. ... A plethora of other regulations also block development. By one count there are ten protected views of St Paul's Cathedral, including one from a specific oak tree on Hampstead Heath. This imposes severe restrictions on building height across the city. Population density in central London is about half New York's. According to Mr [Paul] Cheshire and Christian Hilber, also of the LSE, restrictive planning policies inflate the price of office space in the West End by about 800%.

This article was published by The Economist on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Monday 25 April 2016

The Daily Mail: Teaching children to read using phonics has 'significant benefits' in helping those from disadvantaged backgrounds or who have English as a second language

An assessment of more than 270,000 children by LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) discovered that those who were learning phonetically had developed far better by age seven than those using traditional methods.

This article was published online by The Daily Mail on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'"Teaching to Teach" Literacy', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Tuesday 19 April 2016

Straits Times (Singapore): The numbers show Britain should stay in the EU

A very awkward fact for the Brexit campaign is that in the last quarter of 2015, Britain's current-account deficit hit a record 7 per cent of GDP. That needs to be financed. But the risk of Brexit is already acting like a flashing red light to foreign investors. According to the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, leaving the EU could reduce foreign direct investment in the UK by 22 per cent and real income by 3.4 per cent.

This article was published online by the Straits Times (Singapore) on April 19, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The Impact of Brexit on Foreign Investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.3, April 2016
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Tuesday 19 April 2016

Financial Times: Free Lunch: Sizing up Little England

This is well illustrated by the excellent Brexit study from the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, which we reported last month.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 18 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Friday 15 April 2016

Chicago Tribune Online: Osborne warns of Brexit cost as leading economies raise concerns

Research for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, published on Friday, estimated that foreign direct investment in Britain could decline by 22 percent if voters choose to leave the EU, reducing incomes by about 3.4 percent. The analysis, carried out by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, found that reduced access to the single market, complexities in coordination between headquarters and local branch offices and uncertainty over trade agreements with the EU would deter investors.

This article appeared in the Chicago Tribune on 15 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Thursday 14 April 2016

Times Higher Education: Cambridge college to fund disadvantaged students' living costs

Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, said that St John's students would welcome the funding but warned that a move towards support coming from universities rather than the government was a ''worrying prospect''. Dr Wyness said that, since less prestigious universities had less money but more students from poorer backgrounds to support, the likely outcome was increased variation in the value of financial support, and increased income inequality in higher education.

This article was published online by the Times Higher Education on April 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Paper No.26, March 2015

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Thursday 14 April 2016

Times Higher Education: Cambridge college to fund disadvantaged students' living costs

Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, said that St John's students would welcome the funding but warned that a move towards support coming from universities rather than the government was a ''worrying prospect''. Dr Wyness said that, since less prestigious universities had less money but more students from poorer backgrounds to support, the likely outcome was increased variation in the value of financial support, and increased income inequality in higher education.

This article was published online by the Times Higher Education on April 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Paper No.26, March 2015

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Thursday 14 April 2016

Times Higher Education: Cambridge college to fund disadvantaged students' living costs

Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, said that St John's students would welcome the funding but warned that a move towards support coming from universities rather than the government was a ''worrying prospect''. Dr Wyness said that, since less prestigious universities had less money but more students from poorer backgrounds to support, the likely outcome was increased variation in the value of financial support, and increased income inequality in higher education.

This article was published online by the Times Higher Education on April 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Paper No.26, March 2015

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Tuesday 12 April 2016

The New York Times: Lifting the patent barrier to new drugs and energy sources

... Do we need a different way to spur innovation and disseminate new technologies quickly around the world? Are patents, which reward inventors by providing them with a government-guaranteed monopoly over their inventions for many years, the best way to encourage new inventions?
... In the case of clean energy technology, noted a study by Professor Hall of Berkeley and Christian Helmers of the Center for Economic Performance in London, ''patent protection may not be the optimal instrument for encouraging innovation.''

This article was published by The New York Times on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Christian Helmers webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Tuesday 12 April 2016

New Geography: LSE/Netherlands research documents price effects of tight housing regulation

New research by London school of economics Professor Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen of the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis provides strength and evidence of the connection between high housing prices and strong regulatory constraints. The paper advances the science by estimating the share of house price increases attributable to regulatory constraints. Hilbur and Vermeulen show that supply constraints are considerably more important in driving up house prices than the physical constraints (such as lack of land or topography) and lending conditions or interest rates.

This article was published online by NewGeography on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related article
April 10, 2016
Vox
Regulation is to blame for England's surge in house prices, Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen

Related publications
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, C. A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, Economic Journal 126(591): 358–405, March 2016.
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, Christian A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, Urban Programme [SERC] Discussion Paper No.119, September 2012

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Tuesday 12 April 2016

The Huffington Post: Why phones don't belong in schools

There's no doubt that smartphones have remarkable capabilities which, in theory, could promote student learning. But the truth is that kids - in spite of the best efforts of parents and teachers - use their phones primarily to access digital amusements. ... It's therefore not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that schools which ban the use of phones experienced a substantial improvement in student test scores, with the researchers concluding that phones ''can have a negative impact on productivity through distraction''. Researchers found that phones hurt vulnerable students the most. Study co-author Dr. Richard Murphy, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas, reports: ''Allowing phones into schools would be the most damaging to low-achieving and low-income students, exacerbating any existing learning inequalities.''

This article was published online by The Huffington Post on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphywebpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Tuesday 12 April 2016

The Huffington Post: Why phones don't belong in schools

There's no doubt that smartphones have remarkable capabilities which, in theory, could promote student learning. But the truth is that kids - in spite of the best efforts of parents and teachers - use their phones primarily to access digital amusements. ... It's therefore not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that schools which ban the use of phones experienced a substantial improvement in student test scores, with the researchers concluding that phones ''can have a negative impact on productivity through distraction''. Researchers found that phones hurt vulnerable students the most. Study co-author Dr. Richard Murphy, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas, reports: ''Allowing phones into schools would be the most damaging to low-achieving and low-income students, exacerbating any existing learning inequalities.''

This article was published online by The Huffington Post on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphywebpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Tuesday 12 April 2016

The Huffington Post: Why phones don't belong in schools

There's no doubt that smartphones have remarkable capabilities which, in theory, could promote student learning. But the truth is that kids - in spite of the best efforts of parents and teachers - use their phones primarily to access digital amusements. ... It's therefore not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that schools which ban the use of phones experienced a substantial improvement in student test scores, with the researchers concluding that phones ''can have a negative impact on productivity through distraction''. Researchers found that phones hurt vulnerable students the most. Study co-author Dr. Richard Murphy, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas, reports: ''Allowing phones into schools would be the most damaging to low-achieving and low-income students, exacerbating any existing learning inequalities.''

This article was published online by The Huffington Post on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphywebpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Monday 11 April 2016

Eurasia Review: Regulation To Blame For England's Surging House Prices – Analysis, By Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen

New causal evidence on the impact of supply constraints on house prices shows land use regulation to be a major culprit of England’s current housing affordability crisis. Absent regulation, house prices would be lower by over a third and considerably less volatile. Young households are the obvious losers, yet macroeconomic stability is also impaired and productivity may suffer from constrained labour supply to the thriving cities where demand is highest.

This article appeared on Eurasia Review on 11 April 2016 Link to article

Related Links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Sunday 10 April 2016

Vox: Regulation is to blame for England's surging house prices

It costs a relatively large amount of money to buy a house in the UK - something readers from the UK will almost certainly agree with. But economists differ over why this is. This column argues that strict planning regulations are a prime culprit for sky-high prices and that without any real regulatory change, it is the young that will suffer.

New causal evidence on the impact of supply constraints on house prices shows land use regulation to be a major culprit of England's current housing affordability crisis. Absent regulation, house prices would be lower by over a third and considerably less volatile. Young households are the obvious losers, yet macroeconomic stability is also impaired and productivity may suffer from constrained labour supply to the thriving cities where demand is highest.

This article was published by Vox on April 10, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, C. A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, Economic Journal 126(591): 358–405, March 2016.
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, Christian A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, Urban Programme [SERC] Discussion Paper No.119, September 2012

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 07 April 2016

VOX: Effectiveness of place-based policies: UK evidence

Areas experiencing poor economic performance are often targeted by governments with programmes aimed at improving employment. However, there are concerns that any increases in employment come at the cost of reduced employment elsewhere. This column, by Elias Einiö and Henry Overman examines the displacement effects of one such programme in the UK. While employment increased within the targeted areas, there were comparable decreases in employment just outside the areas' boundaries. These findings suggest place-based policies should focus on traded activities that are less susceptible to local displacement effects.

This article appeared in VOX 07 April 2016. Link to Full Article.

Related links
Elias Einiö webpage
Henry Overman webpage
CEP Urban Programme website

Saturday 02 April 2016

Gulf Times: Minimum wage raised, critics downplay effect

The new increased amount compares with an 8.50 euro minimum wage rate in Germany and almost 9.70 euros in France. In Britain, where unemployment is relatively low at around 5%, large wage inequalities persist and London School of Economics professor Alan Manning described the NLW as “more symbolic” than anything else. “It’s significant but I don’t think one should exaggerate its significance,” he said.

This article appeared in The Gulf Times on 2 April 2016. Link to article

Also in:
The Gulf Today
Jamaica Observer

Related Publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Thursday 31 March 2016

Caledonian Trust PLC : Half yearly Report

In phase three, after the negotiated settlement, the economic effects are the subject of wide and varying analysis and speculation, based largely on the eventual outcome of the settlement. Put simply, there are two main variables: what will the settlement be and what are the effects of such a settlement? Most economic studies report that Brexit would damage the UK economy. Three recent reports from Centre for Economic Performance, the CBI/PWC and Oxford Economics all consider that in the worst case scenario the long-term effects would average about minus £4,000 per annum per household, while the best outcome would vary from minus £680 to plus £70. Martin Wolf, associate editor and chief economic commentator of the FT, forthright as usual, says: ''A vote for Brexit is a leap into the abyss''. UK Industry and Financial ''establishment'' figures are prominent amongst those predicting an unfavourable outcome for Brexit.

This Report was published by the Caledonian Trust PLC on March 31, 2016
Link to the Report here

Related publications
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Holger Breinlich webpage
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Saturday 05 March 2016

U.S. News and World Report: Arguments and allegations are flying as Britons grapple with how to vote in a June 23 referendum on whether to stay in the European Union or walk away

The London School of Economics' Center for Economic Policy[sic] has calculated that, even if trade barriers with other European countries do not significantly increase, per capita income in Britain will fall by between 1.1 percent and 3.1 percent after a Brexit. ''The possibility of trading more with the rest of the world can't offset the loss of trade with the EU,'' said the center's Thomas Sampson.

This article was published by U.S. News & World Report on March 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.22, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Saturday 05 March 2016

U.S. News and World Report: Arguments and allegations are flying as Britons grapple with how to vote in a June 23 referendum on whether to stay in the European Union or walk away

The London School of Economics' Center for Economic Policy[sic] has calculated that, even if trade barriers with other European countries do not significantly increase, per capita income in Britain will fall by between 1.1 percent and 3.1 percent after a Brexit. ''The possibility of trading more with the rest of the world can't offset the loss of trade with the EU,'' said the center's Thomas Sampson.

This article was published by U.S. News & World Report on March 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.22, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Saturday 05 March 2016

U.S. News and World Report: Arguments and allegations are flying as Britons grapple with how to vote in a June 23 referendum on whether to stay in the European Union or walk away

The London School of Economics' Center for Economic Policy[sic] has calculated that, even if trade barriers with other European countries do not significantly increase, per capita income in Britain will fall by between 1.1 percent and 3.1 percent after a Brexit. ''The possibility of trading more with the rest of the world can't offset the loss of trade with the EU,'' said the center's Thomas Sampson.

This article was published by U.S. News & World Report on March 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.22, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Monday 29 February 2016

BBC South East: Inside Out

Paul Cheshire is interviewed about building on the green belt in the South East.

The interview was broadcast by BBC South East on the Inside Out programme on February 29, 2016
Link to recorded interview here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 18 February 2016

The Times: Number of £1 million homes to triple by 2030

... Paul Cheshire, emeritus professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, who conducted the...

This article appeared in the Times on 18 February 2016. Link to article

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Thursday 18 February 2016

The Independent: UK homes worth £1m to ‘triple by 2030'

“For those who still aspire to buy a home, it will make taking that step on to the ladder increasingly difficult,” said Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at London School of Economics, who authored the report.

This article appeared in the Indepednent on 18 February 2016. Link to article

Also in: The Herald and Coventry Telegraph, iPaper, The Journal (Newcastle)

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Thursday 18 February 2016

Daily Telegraph: Number of £1m homes set to triple by 2030 - but first-time buyers will still struggle

Professor Paul Cheshire from London School of Economics and Political Science, who co-authored the report, said: “Property price inflation is beneficial for existing owners who will see their net-wealth increase, but it will make entering the market more difficult still for new buyers.”

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 18 February 2016 Link to article

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Sunday 10 January 2016

Mail on Sunday: Donald Trump's £700m blowhard: Economist brands billionaire's promise of Scots bonanza a 'fairytale'

Professor Paul Cheshire accused the tycoon of hugely exaggerating the size and benefits of his stake in Scotland and said promises made by him were falling apart at the seams.

This article was published by the Mail on Sunday on January 10, 2016
Link to article here

Related Links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Friday 18 December 2015

Private Sector Development (World bank blog): What's next fo the competitive cities initiative: ‘To travel far, let's travel together'

The World Bank Group launched the Competitive Cities report [1] on December 10 - ''Competitive Cities for Jobs and Growth: What, Who and How,'' which represents almost two years of research and analysis to put together a reliable, comprehensive and unified body of work. It is aimed primarily to help cities formulate and implement economic development strategies, and it is intended to be used by city leaders themselves. ... ''This [report] seems like a natural outflow from the World Development Report 2009 [7] ... [That report in] 2009 was a huge step [8] in getting us towards thinking more about cities [9]. What is really nice about this report is that it is the next step on this journey [of trying to understand] how we should be structuring decision-making to try to drive forward this [economic development of cities] agenda.'' - Professor Henry Overman, London School of Economics; Director, What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth.

This article was published online by Private Sector Development (World bank blog) on December 18, 2015
Link to the blog article here

Related links
Henry Overman webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Friday 11 December 2015

The Economist: A notch looser

The new proposals would probably affect just a few hundred hectares, says Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics—“a spit in the ocean”. But it is nonetheless significant that the government is sanctioning any kind of review of the green-belt policy, he says.

This article appeared in the Economist on 11 December 2015. Link to artilce

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Wednesday 02 December 2015

El Pais: La Comunidad Valenciana ante el dilemma de la reindustrializacion

Faced with the dilemma of re-industrialization Valencia
Andres Rodriguez-Pose, Professor at the London School of Economics, said for his part, that the Valencian economy is currently ''very weak''. And has highlighted the paradox that, despite being a territory historically exporter, the internationalization of enterprises is lower than the Spanish average. And that, despite being a community with entrepreneurial tradition, the level of training of entrepreneurs is also below the average.

This article was published by El Pais on December 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Andres Rodriguez-Pose webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 12 November 2015

Evening Standard : Let's build on green belt to ease squeeze on commuters

Real house prices — but not real incomes — have grown faster in the UK over the last 40 years than in any other developed country, according to the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Evening Standard on 12 November 2015. Link to article

Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Saturday 07 November 2015

Eurasia Review: Offshoring and the geography of British jobs – analysis

Offshoring has risen in all advanced economies in recent years. This column analyses the impact of offshoring trends in the UK, where offshoring in services has followed the abundant offshoring in manufacturing, by uncovering their spatial implications. The impact of offshoring in places more exposed to such trends has been significantly negative on routine occupations. On the other hand, when investment abroad targeted developing economies, the effect on job creation in non-routine occupations was positive.

This article appeared in the Eurasia Review on 7 November 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Offshoring and the Geography of Jobs in Great Britain Luisa Gagliardi, Simona Iammarino and Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, SERC Discussion Paper No.185, October 2015

Related Links
Luisa Gagliardi webpage
Simona Iammarino webpage
Andres Rodriguez-Pose webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Tuesday 27 October 2015

Times Higher Education (Online): NSS results have little impact on university applications, study finds

An institution moving from the bottom of the scale (around a 65 per cent NSS satisfaction score) to the top of the scale (around 95 per cent satisfaction) results in a degree course gaining only about seven more applicants for every 100 it already receives, according to Stephen Gibbons, professor of economic geography and environment at the London School of Economics (LSE) and co-author of the report.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education (Online) on 27 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Thursday 15 October 2015

Housebuilding in Britain: How to build more?: The Economist (Online)

Council tax is set at the local level. This should give councils a reason to build more houses: more houses, more tax revenue. But it does not, as Christian Hilber of the London School of Economics explains. For one, council taxes bear little relation to underlying property values (they are based on prices prevailing in the early 1990s).

This article appeared in the Economist Online on 15 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Christian Hilber CEP publications webpage

Wednesday 30 September 2015

The Atlantic: The $5 cereal that provoked a London mob

In the East London case, wrote Paul Cheshire, an emeritus professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, via email, ''the very early relatively poor but mainly educated/drop-out pioneer gentrifiers - typical of most processes of gentrification moving into areas of architectural interest in mainly inner city neighborhoods when those are still rundown and largely occupied by working class or refugee poor - are being replaced by richer and more market-oriented still mainly liberal professional and successfully university educated successor gentrifiers, who are a good bit richer and (commercially) fashion-conscious''. The ''pioneer gentrifiers'' were attracted not just to East London's cheapness but also its edginess, which they believe the richer groups are eroding.

This article was published online by The Atlantic (USA) on September 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage



Wednesday 30 September 2015

The Times: We ought to be appalled to see what's happening to the greenbelt

This was based on a study by Professor Paul Cheshire, of the London School of Economics, which declared that...

This article was published by The Times on September 30, 2015
[Subscription needed to view article.]

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Saturday 26 September 2015

The Economist: Through the roof

Much green-belt land is far from green: one-third of London’s and three-quarters of that in Cambridge is intensive arable land, estimates Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics, who says there is enough green-belt land in Greater London to build 1.6m houses.

This article appeared in the Economist on 26 September 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Friday 25 September 2015

Forbes: Governments Still Don't Know Which Policies Help Entrepreneurs

These are the sorts of questions the excellent What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth looks at. It recently delved into the evidence around innovation policy and will have a report out on the matter soon. I caught up with its Director Professor Henry Overman to find out more about what works in innovation policy.

This article appeared on Forbes on 25 September 2015 Link to article

Related Links
Henry Overman webpage
What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth webpage

Friday 25 September 2015

Forbes: Governments still don't know which policies help entrepreneurs

Henry Overman interviewed by Philip Salter
It's easy to make policy, but it's hard to make the right ones. These are the sorts of questions the excellent What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth looks at. It recently delved into the evidence around innovation policy and will have a report out on the matter soon. I caught up with its Director Professor Henry Overman to find out more about what works in innovation policy.

This article was published online by Forbes on September 25, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Henry Overman webpage
Urban Economics and Urban Policy Programmewebpage
What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth website



Monday 21 September 2015

BBC Radio Kent: Paul Cheshire interview

Yes we spoke to Professor Paul Cheshire an economist and housing expert at the London school of economics he strongly believes that our greenbelt rules need shaking up in order to meet the house building crisis.

This programme was broadcast on 21 September 2015 Link to article

Also on:
BBC South East (TV)
Inside Out
This professor, an expert in housing and the economy at the London School of Economics says the current Green Belt policy should be shaken up. Link

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014 CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage Urban Economics Programme webpage

Monday 21 September 2015

BBC Radio Kent : News

Paul Cheshire interviewed on housing shortage in the South East and how building on the greenbelt necessary and acceptable to do so when within 2 km of a railway station.

This programme was broadcast on 21 September 2015. Link to article

See also:
BBC South East (TV)
Inside Out
This professor, an expert in housing and the economy at the London School of Economics says the current Green Belt policy should be shaken up.
Link to article here

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website



Thursday 17 September 2015

ITV1 Anglia West: News

Reference to LSE study which shows academic benefits of banning mobiles in schools

This programme was broadcast on 17 September 2015 (no link available).

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Wednesday 16 September 2015

Financial Times : Ireland leads the way as eurozone homes market begins to recover

"I am sceptical of attempts to aggregate house price data because there is no such thing as a European real estate market," said Christian Hilber, a housing expert at the London School of Economics. "Real estate markets are inherently local. Even within individual states there are big differences driven by local demand and supply condition.”

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 16 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Monday 14 September 2015

BBC Radio Wiltshire: News

Mention of LSE research on the effects of mobile phone use on children.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio Wiltshire on 14 September 2015 (no link available.

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Sunday 13 September 2015

Svenska Dagbladet online (Sweden): Garage säljs som bostäder – p-platser kostar miljoner

Under perioden mellan 1994 och 2012 borde man ha byggt över två miljoner fler hus. De höga priserna beror på en kronisk brist på bostäder, anser Paul Cheshire, professor i ekonomisk geografi på London School of Economics.
In the period between 1994 and 2012 should have built more than two million more houses. The high prices are due to a chronic lack of housing, thinks Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in Svenska Dagbladet on 13 September 2015. Link to article Related links

Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) Website

Friday 04 September 2015

Welt online: Willkommen in Deutschstadt!

...Produktivitat und dadurch zu mehr Wachstum'', sagt etwa Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor an der London School of Economics (LSE).
''Urbanisation leads to higher productivity and therefore to more growth,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, associate professor at the London School of Economics (LSE).

This article was published online by De Welt online on September 4, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website



Tuesday 01 September 2015

Acteurspublics: Plus ou moins d'autonomie : à chacun son école…

...Unprecedented and profound mutation in the English system", says Stephen Machin, Professor of Economics at the University College of London (UCL).

This article was published online by Acteurspublics on September 1, 2015
Link to article here [Subscription needed.]

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Saturday 15 August 2015

LSE British Politics and Policy blog: Corbyn and the political economy of nostalgia

Article by John Van Reenen
Unlike most commentators I have actually read Corbyn's ''The Economy in 2020'' as well as the 1983 manifesto. Corbyn's document has several major advantages. First, at 8 pages it is much shorter and second, it does not (yet) commit the UK to leaving the European Union (a very silly idea). Indeed, Corby-nomics strikes many of the right notes. Low productivity is holding down wages and inadequate infrastructure in housing, transport and energy is, in turn, depressing productivity. This resonates with my findings in the LSE Growth Commission.

This article was published online in the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on August 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Should we stay or should we go?, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP Election Analyses 2015, March 2015

Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, CEP Election Analyses 2015, March 2015
  • VIEW accompanying video here

  • Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Innovation and Infrastructure, LSE Growth Commission in partnership with the Institute for Government and the Centre for Economic Performance, John Van Reenen et al., January 2013
  • VIEW accompanying video here
  • Related links
    Swati Dhingra webpage
    Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
    Isabelle Roland webpage
    Thomas Sampson webpage
    Anna Valero webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    Monday 10 August 2015

    Building-Projects.co.uk: London faces skyscraper pressure unless planning laws change

    [Gabriel] Ahlfeldt, an Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science, says as long as outward growth is prevented by policies such as the 'green belt', the city will need to grow vertically as the population increases.

    This article was published online by Building-Projects.co.uk on August 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Also in:
    Social House Building & Maintenance
    London faces skyscraper pressure unless planning laws change
    Building Construction Design
    London faces skyscraper pressure unless planning laws change

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website



    Monday 06 July 2015

    London Essays: London's 'digital economy'

    Article by Max Nathan
    Despite the recent hype, London's digital sector appears to have shrunk since 2010, with much of the 2000s surge wiped out, and has only recently turned the corner.

    This article was published online by London Essays on July 6, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Dr Max Nathan webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website



    Monday 22 June 2015

    Chron: The Economist tallies the cost of excessive land-use regulation

    Similar work by Paul Cheshire and Christian Hilber, of the London School of Economics, estimated that in the early 2000s this regulatory shadow tax was roughly 300% in Milan and Paris, 450% in the City of London, and 800% in its West End. The lion's share of the value of commercial real estate in Europe's most economically important cities is thus attributable to rules that make building difficult.

    This article was published in the blog Chron on June 22, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Land use planning: the impact on retail productivity, Paul Cheshire, Christian Hilber and Ioannis Kaplanis. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 1, Summer 2011
    'Evaluating the Effects of Planning Policies on the Retail Sector: Or do Town Centre First Policies Deliver the Goods?', Paul Cheshire, Christian Hilber and Ioannis Kaplanis, Spatial Economics Research Centre Discussion Paper No.66, January 2011

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website



    Thursday 18 June 2015

    Stern: Ein Blick zurück: Staatspleiten sind nicht so selten

    A look back: national bankruptcies are not so rare
    The economic historian Albrecht Ritschl called Germany the most wayward of the 20th century: ''The Federal Republic owes your today's financial stability and its status as a senior teacher of Europe alone the United States, who have renounced a lot of money in both after the first and after the second world war'', he said.

    This article was published online by Stern on June 18, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

    Related links
    Albrecht Ritschl webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    Sunday 14 June 2015

    BBC Radio 4: News

    Paul Cheshire discusses using limited amount of London's green belt for housing.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4 News on June 14, 2015
    [No link available.]

    Related Publications
    The Green Belt: A Place for Londoners?, by SERC, Quod and London First, published 24 February 2015
    Turning Houses into Gold: The Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Tuesday 09 June 2015

    The Financial Times: UK property crisis scuppering aspiration

    Britain's politicians say they are keen to reward aspiration, but soaring house prices are a significant block to achieving this. Professor Christian Hilber, from the London School of Economics, explains to Ferdinando Giugliano how this can be fixed.

    This film was published by The Financial Times on June 9, 2015
    Link to interview here

    Related publications
    'UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research', Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing' - view here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Tuesday 02 June 2015

    The Financial Times: Property puzzle

    Partly as a result London house prices per square foot are now the second highest in the world after Monaco, according to the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance. The problem is acute: the average UK home now costs a first-time buyer five times their income, up from 2.8 times in the early 1980s. That has in turn fuelled demand for rented accommodation, pushing up the costs and eating up increasing amounts of state subsidy.

    This article was published online by the Financial Times on June 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research, Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015

    Related CEP videos/podcasts
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing'
    View video here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website



    Tuesday 05 May 2015

    The Financial Times: Digital start-ups question links to 'Tech City'

    ''Our ambition is to bring together the creativity and energy of Shoreditch and the incredible possibilities of the Olympic Park to help make east London one of the world's great technology centres,'' Mr Cameron said in 2010. According to research by the London School of Economics and National Institute of Economic and Social Research, the number of digital jobs in the area climbed from 16,578 in 2012 to 18,679 in 2013. ''Policy has certainly hugely raised awareness of the London tech scene,'' says Max Nathan.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on May 5, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Max Nathan webpage
    Max Nathan publications webpage
    Spatial Economics Research website



    Monday 27 April 2015

    The Financial Times: Rent controls that aren't

    Both labour and its opponents make too much of a new policy
    Labour made two housing policy commitments over the weekend, only one of which was interesting. The uninteresting one was the promise to cut stamp duty for first-time buyers. That just aligns Labour with the coalition government in a silly rivalry for measures that help aspiring homeowners with one hand while pulling their goal out of reach with the other. In a supply-constrained market, the effect of demand subsidies (which all of these are) is just to drive up the price. That point is made in the best short guide to UK housing policy, a new election briefing from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on April 27, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research', Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing' - view here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website


    Monday 27 April 2015

    The Financial Times: Rent controls that aren't

    Both labour and its opponents make too much of a new policy
    Labour made two housing policy commitments over the weekend, only one of which was interesting. The uninteresting one was the promise to cut stamp duty for first-time buyers. That just aligns Labour with the coalition government in a silly rivalry for measures that help aspiring homeowners with one hand while pulling their goal out of reach with the other. In a supply-constrained market, the effect of demand subsidies (which all of these are) is just to drive up the price. That point is made in the best short guide to UK housing policy, a new election briefing from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on April 27, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research', Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing' - view here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website


    Monday 27 April 2015

    The Financial Times: Rent controls that aren't

    Both labour and its opponents make too much of a new policy
    Labour made two housing policy commitments over the weekend, only one of which was interesting. The uninteresting one was the promise to cut stamp duty for first-time buyers. That just aligns Labour with the coalition government in a silly rivalry for measures that help aspiring homeowners with one hand while pulling their goal out of reach with the other. In a supply-constrained market, the effect of demand subsidies (which all of these are) is just to drive up the price. That point is made in the best short guide to UK housing policy, a new election briefing from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on April 27, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research', Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing' - view here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website


    Tuesday 21 April 2015

    PC Pro: The upsides and downsides of Tech City

    As far as the government is concerned, London's Tech City is a success. But what effect has it had on employment in the area - and what are the downsides? The LSE's Dr Max Nathan is trying to find out what has worked and what hasn't.

    This article was published by PC Pro magazine on April 21, 2015
    View article here

    Related links
    Max Nathan webpage
    Max Nathan publications webpage
    Spatial Economics Research website



    Friday 27 February 2015

    The Evening Standard: More houses would be a better use of London land than golf courses

    The stereotype of concrete London is misleading: a fifth of all land in the Greater London Authority is green belt, according to a report by the London School of Economics, business group London First and planning firm Quod. In some boroughs, it's half. But only about a quarter of the capital's green belt is the kind of land we might expect: parks dedicated to public access, or environmentally-protected habitats. Of the rest, 76 per cent is used for agriculture, and derelict buildings such as historic hospitals and water treatment works.

    This article was published in The Evening Standard on February 27, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    The Green Belt: A Place for Londoners?, by SERC, Quod and London First, published 24 February 2015
    Turning Houses into Gold: The Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Monday 23 February 2015

    Mail online: How do YOU think NHS money should be spent? Boob jobs, liver transplants for alcoholics or vital support for dementia patients? New TV show asks the public for their view

    Can the NHS cope with the rapid rise in dementia patients? Ros is one of 670,000 carers, but she needs help - £350 will provide a support nurse
    Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said: 'One of the biggest numbers we should worry about is the number of people who have dementia now in the UK, it is estimated at more than 800,000'.

    This article was published in the Mail online on February 23, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Friday 06 February 2015

    LSE showcases SERC Impact Case Studies: Research Impact site launched

    LSE has launched a Research Impact site which showcases how researchers at the School have worked with policymakers and communities around the world, and gathers together Impact Case Studies from the 2014 REF .

    SERC has two case studies placed front and centre on the site. The first looks at how SERC has influenced urban economic policy in the UK, both in central Government and working with cities like Manchester. The second focuses on Paul Cheshire’s research on land use planning , which has highlighted the economic effects of the UK planning system and helped drive national debates on housing, the green belt and town centre first policies.

    Thursday 05 February 2015

    The Financial Times: The solution to England's housing crisis lies in the green belt

    Building an economy upon a massive and growing distortion in the market for land is foolish
    In a recent paper, Christian Hilber of the London School of Economics and Wouter Vermeulen of the Netherlands bureau for economic policy analysis, note that real house prices have grown faster in the UK over the past 40 years than in any other member of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Prices, particularly in London and the South East, are among the highest in the world. In the absence of controls, real prices would have risen by around 90 per cent between 1974 and 2008, instead of 190 per cent. ... Paul Cheshire of the LSE even argues that these policies have made houses more similar to art or gold than to humble dwellings.

    This article was published by the Financial Times on February 5, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England', Christian A.L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, SERC Discussion Paper No.119, September 2012
    Turning Houses into Gold: The Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Monday 02 February 2015

    The Sunday Telegraph: Playing with political fire

    Professor Luis Garicano from the London School of Economics says it is Syriza that has misjudged badly, both by teaming up in coalition with a virulently anti-German party, and by violating Troika terms across the board – halting privatisation, raising the minimum wage to €750 a month, re-hiring 10,000 civil servants, and blocking mortgage foreclosures. “Tsipras is slapping the Germans in the face: it is almost as if he wishes to be thrown out of Europe. I can’t see any political support for Syriza from any government in southern Europe. They are all terrified of their own populist movements,” he says.

    This article appeared in The Telegraph on 2 February 2015 link to article

    Related Links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Thursday 29 January 2015

    The Economist (web): The paradox of the ghetto

    Britain has prized the ideal of economically mixed neighbourhoods since the 19th century. Poverty and disadvantage are intensified when poor people cluster, runs the argument; conversely, the rich are unfairly helped when they are surrounded by other rich people. Social mixing ought to help the poor. It sounds self-evident - and colours planning regulations that ensure much social and affordable housing is dotted among more expensive private homes. Yet ''there is absolutely no serious evidence to support this,'' says Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics (LSE).

    This article was published online by The Economist on January 29, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire here
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website
    Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage

    Tuesday 27 January 2015

    Real Estate Business: Sydney property prices almost 10 times income

    Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics refers to a "fatal mismatch between the operational concepts of demand and supply in markets and the parallel concepts with which the planning system works." “As noted above, younger households are among the most significantly victimised by the housing affordability losses,” he said. “The lucky ones will inherit homes from their parents – which is a big step away from legendary urbanologist Sir Peter Hall's ‘ideal of a property-owning democracy’,” he said.

    This article appeared in Real Estate Business on 27 January 2015 link to article

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre webpage

    Tuesday 27 January 2015

    Real Estate Business: Sydney property prices almost 10 times income

    Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics refers to a "fatal mismatch between the operational concepts of demand and supply in markets and the parallel concepts with which the planning system works." “As noted above, younger households are among the most significantly victimised by the housing affordability losses,” he said. “The lucky ones will inherit homes from their parents – which is a big step away from legendary urbanologist Sir Peter Hall's ‘ideal of a property-owning democracy’,” he said.

    This article appeared in Real Estate Business on 27 January 2015 link to article

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre webpage

    Wednesday 21 January 2015

    Conservativehome: The three way fight for the future of the Green Belt

    Consider the example of planning policy. On one side of the barricades, there are those opposed to new development - perhaps not in general, but certainly when it comes to any specific attempt to build much-needed new housing. Lined up against them is the pro-development lobby who want to see the existing restrictions on new-build swept away. Looking on a map the biggest such restriction is the Green Belt - which the radicals want to get rid of. Their arguments are neatly encapsulated in a piece for City AM by Ben Southwood, who makes a number of interesting points:
    ''According to LSE professor Paul Cheshire, new build houses are about 40 per cent bigger in the Netherlands and 38 per cent bigger in Germany than they are in England. And yet housing goes for 45 per cent less per square metre in the Netherlands and, in Germany, prices did not rise throughout the entire 1971 to 2002 period ''

    This article was published online by Conservativehome on January 21, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre webpage

    Saturday 10 January 2015

    El Confidencial: La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

    Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

    This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
    Link here

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Saturday 10 January 2015

    El Confidencial: La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

    Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

    This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
    Link here

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Tuesday 09 December 2014

    Mail Online UK: Wind farms 'have no significant effect' on house prices, claims study

    This research, which was recently published in the journal Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics, is the first peer-reviewed study on the subject. It contradicts research earlier this year by the London School of Economics (LSE) which found that values of homes within 1.2 miles (1.9km) of large wind farms were being slashed by about 11 per cent.

    This article appeared in the Mail Online on 9 December 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices, Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014
    Gone with the Wind Stephen Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014

    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Sunday 07 December 2014

    Londonist: Things to do in London: Monday 8 December 2014

    LONDON GREENBELT: The London Society was instrumental in formulating London's Green Belt in the 20th century. Tonight, near Farringdon, it hosts a debate about the future of London's Green Belt with Jonathan Manns on behalf of the Society, Paul Cheshire from London School of Economics and David Knight from Royal College of Art.

    This article was published by the Londonist on December 7, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website

    Friday 28 November 2014

    SpyGhana: There are over 70,000 hidden ICT companies in UK

    The United Kingdom has discovered that its Information Economy industries could be 42 per cent larger than current estimates, with at least 70,000 extra ICT-producing companies recently captured in a recent data find operating in hotspots across the country. This was contained in new research published by Dr Max Nathan and Dr Anna Rosso at NIESR, alongside Francois Bouet at Growth Intelligence and funded by Nesta. Using 'big data' the report sets out alternative counts of firms in the Government's 'Information Economy' industries, and compares these to estimates using conventional industry codes.

    This article was published by SpyGhana on November 28, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Mapping Information Economy Businesses with Big Data: Findings for the UK', Max Nathan and Anna Rosso, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.44, December 2014

    Related links
    Max Nathan webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Friday 14 November 2014

    The Times: The growing love affair with a park

    A team of researchers from Imperial College Business School and LSE found that property prices across the UK increase on average by about 3 per cent when internet speed doubles.

    This article was published by The Times on November 14, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways Speed', Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper No.161, July 2014

    Related Links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Thursday 06 November 2014

    BBC South: News

    Paul Cheshire discusses housing affordability and need to build new housing.

    This interview was broadcast by BBC South on November 6, 2014
    (no link available)

    Also on:
    BBC Radio Oxford

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website
    Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage

    Friday 24 October 2014

    Mail Online UK: High speed rail 'tsar' to spark fresh controversy with new HS2 route and stations recommendations

    A panel of academic experts told the Treasury select committee that the report overstated the benefits by six to eight times. Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, who is to give evidence to the committee on Tuesday, said findings used a procedure that was 'essentially made up'.

    This article appeared in the Daily Mail on October 24, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits Henry Overman, February 2012 Paper No' CEPCP361 in CentrePiece Vol. 16 Issue. 3 Winter

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC webpage
    Globalisation webpage

    Monday 20 October 2014

    British Politics and Policy Blog - LSE: Gone with the wind: house prices are negatively affected where turbines are visible

    Wind turbines are generally popular as a source of green energy but face considerable opposition from the people who have to live near them. Steve Gibbons uses local property markets as a way to value the visual impact of wind farms and finds significant negative effects on house prices in postcodes where the turbines are visible.

    This article was posted online by the LSE's British Politics and Policy blog on October 20, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014
    Gone with the Wind, Stephen Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014

    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Sunday 19 October 2014

    The Observer: Is it time to rethink Britain's green belt?

    Professor Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics, has written that ''the unstoppable damage they do to societal fairness, housing affordability, the economic efficiency of our cities, even the environment, is devastating''. He argues that new houses in Britain are 40 percent more expensive than the Netherlands, which is more densely populated, and that the green belt is at least partly to blame.

    This article was published in The Observer on October 19, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications and films
    Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis, LSE film. Also available to view on You Tube - Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website


    Thursday 16 October 2014

    Britain News.Net: Vince Cables golf course plan fails to hook critics

    Alluding to research from the London School of Economics, which showed more of Surrey if devoted to golf courses than housing, Dr Cable said if he was in a middle-income family struggling to find a home in the county, he would ask ''is a golf course sacred or are there better uses of the land?''

    This article was published online by Britain News.Net on October 16, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications and films
    Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis, LSE film. Also available to view on You Tube - Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website


    Tuesday 14 October 2014

    DiarioLibre.com: Es la ''crisis de la mediana edad'' solo una excusa?

    Is the mid-life crisis just an excuse?
    However, a study published earlier this year found that an average decrease of subjective happiness, or welfare as described by economists in middle age, between 40 and 42 years occurs. Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee, coauthor of the longitudinal research conducted in three countries, said that this confirms previous studies showing a relationship between age and the use of antidepressants. ...
    Dr. Hannes Schwandt, Princeton University, believes midlife, unlike childhood and old age, has not been investigated. Last year, he published the research focused on the ''unfulfilled expectations''. It was found that young people are optimistic perhaps even ''too optimistic'' - while those in their forties and fifties feel repentance before they feel at peace with themselves in older age. ''Maybe people of middle age can learn from the elderly, who are less regretful and more accepting'' he suggests. ...
    Paul Dolan, professor of behavioral science at the London School of Economics and author of Happiness by Design believes we need a mix of purpose and pleasure to feel truly happy. In a future article, argues that much of the economic literature on midlife crisis centers on our assessments of what makes us happy rather than our actual experiences. In other words, the stories we tell ourselves about what makes us happy, which a prestigious job is good- even depress us our daily experience of this work.

    This article was published online by DiarioLibre.com on October 14, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    'Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing', Hannes Schwandt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1229, July 2013
    Happiness by Design: Finding pleasure and purpose in everyday life, Paul Dolan, Allen Lane, August 2014, ISBN 9780241003107 Details

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Hannes Schwandt webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Tuesday 14 October 2014

    Adam Smith Institute Blog: Tired of London?

    As the LSE’s Paul Cheshire points out, politicians haven’t stepped up to the plate. The coalitions’ Help to Buy policies are doing little (except pushing up prices), while Labour’s suggestion for partial controls on rents, increased security of tenure, and elimination of agent’s fees for finding housing for renters, will probably just decrease rental supply as fewer people want to become landlords.

    This article appeared in the Adam Smith Blog on 14 October 2014 link to article

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website
    Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage

    Tuesday 14 October 2014

    Golf Business News: Cable Off Line With Golf Comments Says PGA Chief

    The Business Secretary’s comments came in relation to research by the London School of Economics that claimed more of Surrey is devoted to golf courses than housing with a total of 103 courses in the county.

    This article appeared in link to article

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website


    Tuesday 14 October 2014

    The Times: CITY PEOPLE

    Vince Cable's in trouble for suggesting we build on golf courses. The business secretary was referring to research by the London School of Economics showing that more of Surrey is devoted to golf than housing.

    This article appeared in the Times on 14 October 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Friday 10 October 2014

    Clarin: No va mas...quien ganara el Nobel de Economia?

    Veronica Rappoport of the Centre for Economic Performance comments on her choice to be recipient(s) of this year's Nobel Prize for Economics:
    ''At some point should touch the area of economic growth: Romer, Aghion and perhaps Barro I would love a prize for. Holmstrom and Tirole.''

    This article was published online by Clarin on October 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Veronica Rappoport webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Friday 10 October 2014

    Clarin: No va mas...quien ganara el Nobel de Economia?

    Veronica Rappoport of the Centre for Economic Performance comments on her choice to be recipient(s) of this year's Nobel Prize for Economics:
    ''At some point should touch the area of economic growth: Romer, Aghion and perhaps Barro I would love a prize for. Holmstrom and Tirole.''

    This article was published online by Clarin on October 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Veronica Rappoport webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Wednesday 08 October 2014

    The Times: Build homes on golf courses, suggests Cable

    New homes should be built on golf courses in an attempt to solve the housing crisis, Vince Cable has suggested. ... Dr Cable was responding to a study by the London School of Economics which suggested that more of Surrey was used for golf courses than housing.

    This article was published by The Times on October 8, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related articles
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Tuesday 30 September 2014

    The McKinsey Quarterly: Why management matters for productivity

    Article by John Dowdy and John Van Reenen
    While government policy will play a key role, the actions of managers and their organizations will decisively influence the realization of global productivity potential in the years ahead.

    This article was published online by the McKinsey Quarterly on September 30, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Management Practices Across Firms and Countries', Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011
    Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter, Nicholas Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, July 2007

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Management Practices and Organisational Structures research webpage

    Tuesday 30 September 2014

    The McKinsey Quarterly: Why management matters for productivity

    Article by John Dowdy and John Van Reenen
    While government policy will play a key role, the actions of managers and their organizations will decisively influence the realization of global productivity potential in the years ahead.

    This article was published online by the McKinsey Quarterly on September 30, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Management Practices Across Firms and Countries', Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011
    Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter, Nicholas Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, July 2007

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Management Practices and Organisational Structures research webpage

    Friday 19 September 2014

    Financial Times: Pay pressure

    Prof John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, notes that average workers have been hit hardest. “Over time non-manual jobs have found their tasks taken over by computers and robots. Think of bank clerks and ATM machines,” he says. In Japan, it is the young who have been hurt worst as the traditional salaried jobs in big companies dwindled.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 19 September 2014 link to article

    Related Publications In brief - New technology: who wins, who loses? John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun, May 2014, Paper No' CEPCP418, CentrePiece 19 (1) Spring2014 pages: 6-7
    The Distinct Effects of Information Technology and Communication Technology on Firm Organisation Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No. 927, May 2009, Revised June 2013

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage

    Friday 19 September 2014

    Financial Times: Pay pressure

    Prof John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, notes that average workers have been hit hardest. “Over time non-manual jobs have found their tasks taken over by computers and robots. Think of bank clerks and ATM machines,” he says. In Japan, it is the young who have been hurt worst as the traditional salaried jobs in big companies dwindled.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 19 September 2014 link to article

    Related Publications In brief - New technology: who wins, who loses? John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun, May 2014, Paper No' CEPCP418, CentrePiece 19 (1) Spring2014 pages: 6-7
    The Distinct Effects of Information Technology and Communication Technology on Firm Organisation Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No. 927, May 2009, Revised June 2013

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage

    Friday 19 September 2014

    Financial Times: Pay pressure

    Prof John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, notes that average workers have been hit hardest. “Over time non-manual jobs have found their tasks taken over by computers and robots. Think of bank clerks and ATM machines,” he says. In Japan, it is the young who have been hurt worst as the traditional salaried jobs in big companies dwindled.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 19 September 2014 link to article

    Related Publications In brief - New technology: who wins, who loses? John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun, May 2014, Paper No' CEPCP418, CentrePiece 19 (1) Spring2014 pages: 6-7
    The Distinct Effects of Information Technology and Communication Technology on Firm Organisation Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No. 927, May 2009, Revised June 2013

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage

    Thursday 18 September 2014

    The Economist: Paying the field

    Some boosters point to studies, such as that by Gabriel Ahlfeldt of the London School of Economics, which show that house prices increase more rapidly in the vicinity of a new stadium.

    This article appeared in The Economist on 18 September 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Form or function?: the impact of new football stadia on property prices in London Ahlfeldt, Gabriel M. and Kavetsos, SERC Discussion Papers , 87

    Related Links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC webpage

    Tuesday 16 September 2014

    City A.M.: Planning liberalisation is the closest thing there is to an economic silver bullet

    Liberalisation of planning could therefore lower house prices and rents directly, and there would be a direct boost to building growth. But the real gains would come through a fall in the cost burden associated with property. For sectors like childcare, social care, restaurants and even many office-based industries, high rents and property prices raise prices for consumers, with a dynamic strain on our growth prospects brought about by a reduction in competition and innovation. This is especially true in the retail sector, where planning laws, supplemented with ''town centre first'' policies, have led to much smaller stores than in countries like the US. On conservative assumptions, Paul Cheshire from the LSE has estimated that the effects of these self-induced policies may have lowered productivity in the retail sector by as much as 20 per cent - raising the cost of our shopping directly, while depressing the wages of the often low-skilled employees in the sector.

    This article was published by City A.M. on September 16, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website
    Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage

    Sunday 07 September 2014

    The Sunday Telegraph: Garden cities 'not housing solution

    The number of homes to be created – 15,000 – will account for less than 1pc of the UK’s requirement, according to Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the LSE. Mr Cheshire warned that undersupply of housing risks “more volatility in the economy”, as a more turbulent housing sector poses increased risks to the financial system.

    This article appeared in the Sunday Telegraph on 7 September 2014 link to article

    Also in: Remortgage.com

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Saturday 30 August 2014

    ISPreview: Estate Agent Claims Slow Broadband Can Wipe 25% off UK House Values

    A recent study by LSE and the Imperial College Business School, which examined 15 years’ worth of data to identify the impact of faster Internet access on UK house prices, concluded that property prices increase by an average of around 3% when the available broadband speeds doubled.

    This article appeared in ISPreview on 30 August 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways Speed Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis, Tommaso Valletti, July 2014, Paper No' SERCDP0161

    Related Links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC webpage

    Saturday 30 August 2014

    Coventry Evening Telegraph: To Do List

    PAUL DOLAN, a Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics, takes a cool, scientific look at how we can organise our lives to put more joy into them in Happiness By Design (Allen Lane, priced £20/ebook £8.03). Happiness, he says Dolan, lies in finding the right mix of pleasure and purpose - the feeling that what we're doing is worthwhile. For him, becoming happier is more to do with making small adjustments to what we do, rather than big changes - chatting to a stranger to liven up a boring queue, setting up out-of-office emails that make us laugh, minimising distractions - can mean more happiness.

    This article appeared in the Coventry Evening Telegraph on August 30, 2014 (no link available)

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing webpage


    Monday 11 August 2014

    City AM: Make Yourself at Home

    Without the regulatory constraints imposed on our housing market, between 1974 and 2008, average house prices would have risen from £79,000 to £147,000, rather than to £226,000. That's according to a new report by Christian Hilber of the LSE and Wouter Vermeulen of UV University that looks at the impact of supply constraints on house prices in England.

    This article appeared on 11 August 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    SERC webpage

    Wednesday 06 August 2014

    Daily Telegraph: Why UK house prices have grown faster than anywhere else

    Christian A. L. Hilber of the London School of Economics and Wouter Vermeulen of the CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis have just produced a dispassionate analysis of the problem, which will be published shortly in the Economic Journal. They find that house prices in England would have risen by about 100 percentage points fewer, after adjusting for consumer price inflation, from 1974 to 2008, in the absence of regulatory constraints to housebuilding. In other words, they would have shot up from £79,000 to £147,000, instead of £226,000. Another way of putting this is that prices would have been 35pc cheaper.

    This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 6 August 2014 link to article

    Also in: Yahoo! UK and Ireland

    Related Links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    SERC webpage

    Tuesday 05 August 2014

    Broadband Properties Magazine: Internet Speed Closely Linked to Property Values

    Homeowners in London are willing to pay up to 8 percent above the market price for properties in areas offering very fast Internet speeds, according to a new study. The capital’s willingness to pay a premium for good Internet coverage strengthens the case for roll-out of high-speed broadband in densely populated areas, argue researchers from LSE and Imperial College Business School. In the first study of its kind, researchers have analyzed the value of broadband to English households, looking at the link between property prices and broadband availability. Statistics compiled over a 15-year period, from 1995-2010, show that property prices across the UK increase on average by about 3 percent when Internet speed doubles.

    This article appeared in Broadband Properties Magazine on 5 August 2014 link to article

    Also in:
    Individual.com - 'London home owners pay premium for fast internet - study'
    Xataka - Si quieres que tu casa se revalorice, instala fibra óptica

    Related Publications
    Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis, Tommaso Valletti, July 2014, Paper No' SERCDP0161

    Related Links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC webpage

    Tuesday 05 August 2014

    SERC Blog by Gabriel Ahlfeldt: How to roll out high speed broadband in Britain

    We find that property prices increase on average by about 3 per cent when internet speed doubles. Importantly, there are diminishing returns to speed. While the increase in value is even greater when starting from slow internet connections, an increase in nominal speed from 8 to 24 megabits per second raises the property value by no more than 1%. Another main finding is that the consumer surplus differs substantially across regions. It is highest in high income areas that are highly urbanized. As an example, the consumer surplus in London is almost twice as high as in any other of the English regions, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons.

    This article appeared on the SERC Blog on 5 August 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis, Tommaso Valletti, July 2014, Paper No' SERCDP0161

    Related Links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC webpage

    Tuesday 05 August 2014

    Xataka: Si quieres que tu casa se revalorice, instala fibra óptica

    In translation:

    The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) along with the Imperial College Business School have conducted a curious study that analyzed the evolution of the price of more than one million homes in the United Kingdom over 15 years.
    What conclusions have been obtained? Because that apart from housing bubbles, homes with better Internet connection is put on sale for a higher price. For the study they have compared homes in the same area with similar features but with different qualities and speed access to Internet.

    This article was published by Xataka on August 5, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper No.161, July 2014

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC website


    Tuesday 05 August 2014

    Individual.com: 'London home owners pay premium for fast internet - study'

    Home owners in London are willing to pay up to 8 percent above the market price for properties in areas offering very fast internet speeds, according to new research from the London School of Economics (LSE) and Imperial College Business School. The researchers argue that this willingness to pay a premium for good internet coverage strengthens the case for roll-out of high speed broadband in densely populated areas. Data compiled over a 15-year period, from 1995-2010, show that property prices across the UK increase on average by about 3 percent when internet speed doubles. Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons.

    This article was published online by Individual.com on August 5, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper No.161, July 2014

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC website


    Tuesday 05 August 2014

    Broadband Communities - News and Views: Internet speed closely linked to property values

    Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons. ''Speed matters,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, associate professor of urban economics and land development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''The European Commission has set a target by 2020 that every European citizen will need access to at least 30 Mbps and at least 50 percent of households should subscribe to Internet connections above 100 Mbps.''

    This article was published online by Broadband Communities - News and Views on August 5, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper No.161, July 2014

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC website


    Tuesday 05 August 2014

    The Telegraph: Why UK house prices have grown faster than anywhere else

    House prices have grown faster in England since late 1973 than almost all other European countries. So what is going on? The problem is clearly that there is too little supply, given the demand and the growing population. But why? There are two possible kinds of constraints. The first are regulatory: ... The second kind are natural and physical: a scarcity of land, for example, or an uneven topography that makes it very hard to build. So which of the two factors are most important in the case of the UK? And what would happen to prices in their absence? Christian A. L. Hilber of the London School of Economics and Wouter Vermeulen of the CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis have just produced a dispassionate analysis of the problem, which will be published shortly in the Economic Journal.

    This article was published by The Telegraph on August 5, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England', Christian A.L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, SERC Discussion Paper No.119, September 2012 (revised 2014).

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    SERC website


    Monday 04 August 2014

    Daily Express: Want to add three per cent to the value of house? Get better broadband

    Doubling your internet speed could add around three per cent to the value of your home, says a new report out today. The London School of Economics and Political Science and the Imperial College Business School have looked at 15 years’ worth of data and discovered how broadband speeds affect house prices. Their research found that homes with fast connections were, on average, worth more than those with slower speeds.

    This article appeared in the Daily Express on 4 August 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis, Tommaso Valletti, July 2014, Paper No' SERCDP0161

    Related Links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC webpage

    Also in:
    Thinkbroadband
    Cable.co.uk
    Telecompaper
    ISPreview UK
    TMC Net
    USwitch.com

    Thursday 31 July 2014

    LSE News online: Internet speed closely linked to property values

    Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons. ''Speed matters,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''The European Commission has set a target by 2020 that every European citizen will need access to at least 30 megabits per second and at least 50 per cent of households should subscribe to internet connections above 100 megabits per second.''

    This press release was posted online on July 31, 2014
    Link to press release here

    Related publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper no.161, July 2014

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC website


    Thursday 31 July 2014

    LSE News online: Internet speed closely linked to property values

    Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons. ''Speed matters,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''The European Commission has set a target by 2020 that every European citizen will need access to at least 30 megabits per second and at least 50 per cent of households should subscribe to internet connections above 100 megabits per second.''

    This press release was posted online on July 31, 2014
    Link to press release here

    Related publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper no.161, July 2014

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC website


    Thursday 31 July 2014

    LSE News online: Internet speed closely linked to property values

    Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons. ''Speed matters,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''The European Commission has set a target by 2020 that every European citizen will need access to at least 30 megabits per second and at least 50 per cent of households should subscribe to internet connections above 100 megabits per second.''

    This press release was posted online on July 31, 2014
    Link to press release here

    Related publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper no.161, July 2014

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC website


    Friday 25 July 2014

    Yahoo! Argentina: Plan Terapia para Todos: la salud mental de los economistas y las series policiales de Film and Arts

    ''En los paises ricos, las enfermedades mentales son el 38 percent de todas las enfermedades; y el porcentaje trepa a 50 percent en la poblacion trabajadora'', dice Richard Layard, economista de la London School of Economics, que promueve en Inglaterra algo asi como un plan de Terapia para Todos. Layard cuenta, en un libro escrito junto al psicologo David Clark, que los costos de un programa a gran escala de terapias cognitivo-conductuales cortas - 16 sesiones - ''basadas en evidencia con resultados reales'' son mucho menores a los costos que implican las dolencias emocionales en terminos de dias no trabajados, desmotivacion, etcetera.

    This article was published online by Yahoo! Argentina on July 25, 2014
    Link to article here

    See also
    Yahoo! En Espanol
    Yahoo! Colombia
    La Nacion
    Yahoo! Mexico

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard and David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014
    Details

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    David Clark webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Tuesday 22 July 2014

    Centre for Economic Performance Press Release: The 2014 EIB Prize for Excellence in Economic and Social Research awarded to the economists Nicholas Bloom and John Van Reenen

    The EIB Institute announces that this year's 'Outstanding Contribution Award' - with a prize of EUR 40,000 - will go jointly to Professors Nicholas Bloom (Department of Economics, Stanford University) and John Van Reenen (Centre for Economic Performance and Department of Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science) in acknowledgement of the academic excellence, work published and impact on public policy of their research on this year's prize topic ''Innovation, Market Structure and Competitiveness''.

    The press notice was released by the Centre for Economic Performance on July 22, 2014
    Link to the press release here

    Related links
    Nicholas Bloom webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage

    Friday 18 July 2014

    Ely Standard: Campaigners say thousands will be wiped off of property prices if turbine plans go ahead in Haddenham

    Campaigners fighting against plans to erect three wind turbines in Haddenham say thousands of pounds could be wiped off the value of every home in the village if the scheme goes ahead. The Stop Berry Fen Wind Farm group cite a report published in the spring by Professor Stephen Gibbons, of the London School of Economics, which covered more than a million homes in close proximity to large wind farms over a 12-year period.

    This article was published by the Ely Standard on July 18, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014

    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 16 July 2014

    What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth – blog: If you build it will they come?

    Article by Henry Overman
    Our latest evidence review on the economic impact of cultural and sport projects might make for uncomfortable reading for some local decision makers. We looked at these programmes' effects on wages and employment and found that these tended to be small and more likely zero. How might we reconcile this with reports that tend to suggest large benefits for the local economy?

    This blog post was uploaded to the What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth blog on July 16, 2014
    Link to blog here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage

    Wednesday 16 July 2014

    Financial Times: Target the planning laws not the one per cent

    Only 10 per cent of the value of land in expensive cities is due to its natural scarcity. The rest is planning restrictions. Paul Cheshire and Christian Hilber at the London School of Economics applied the same trick to British and European offices in 2006, with terrifying results.

    This article was published by the Financial Times on July 16, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The cost of regulatory constraints on the British office market, Christian A. L. Hilber and Paul Cheshire. Report for the H.M. Treasury in preparation of ‘Barker Review 2’, (2006) H.M. Treasury, London, UK.
    Office Space Supply Restrictions in Britain: The Political Economy of Market Revenge, Paul Cheshire and Christian A. L. Hilber, The Economic Journal, 118 (June, 2008).

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Christian Hilber webpage
    SERC website

    Monday 14 July 2014

    Conservative Home: It's not a case of whether we develop the green belt, but how we do it

    It’s a question we’ve asked before on the Deep End, but let’s ask it again: if we plan on building a million new homes every five years or so, where do we stick ’em? Paul Cheshire of the Spatial Economics Research Centre, has a pretty clear idea: “Almost every reasonable person must now accept the case that we need to build on some parts of currently designated Greenbelt land.”

    This article was posted online by Conservative Home on July 14, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Friday 11 July 2014

    BBC Radio Bristol: News

    Presenter quotes an earlier appearance by Paul Cheshire on the BBC's 'Sunday Politics Show' discussing the use of the green belt for new housing sites.

    This mention was on the BBC Radio Bristol News on July 11, 2014
    [No link available]

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Wednesday 09 July 2014

    The Telegraph: Does Germany rule your world?

    This article was first published on January 28, 2013 and has been republished after Germany beat Brazil 7-1 in the World Cup semi-final
    Second, it is the view of most economists that Germany has been the biggest winner out the euro, and that being part of the euro - rather than keeping its old currency the Deutschmark - has been an enormous advantage. When it joined, the exchange rate was set at EURO 1 = DM1.96, which most people at the time thought was a fair rate. But it is estimated by the European Commission itself that since then, Germany's real exchange rate has fallen by nearly 20 per cent. In other words, if Germany had kept the Deutschmark, the value of its goods would have been 20 per cent more expensive to any potential customer. Being part of the shared euro, kept weak by struggling neighbours, has helped it drag down the cost of its goods. As a result, German cars, kettles and shoelaces suddenly became far cheaper to buy. This argument has long been pushed by Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, no less, who has emerged one of the chief Germany-bashers. But a number of other Nobel prize-winning economists, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Christopher Pissarides, have recently joined him in voicing criticisms of the inherent problems of a powerful northern Europe, led by Germany, and a weak southern Europe all using the same currency. Germany, they say, urgently has to readdress its serious imbalances. The most obvious method would be to make its goods more expensive, by pushing up its workers' wages.

    This article was published online by The Telegraph on July 9, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage

    Monday 07 July 2014

    Rochdale Online: Report challenges economic benefit argument for major sporting and cultural events

    The impact evaluation and evidence review – Sports and Culture: The Impact of Major Events and Facilities –considered 36 post-event evaluations from across the UK and other OECD nations, and assessed the local economic impacts of staging major events on employment, wages and property prices. While acknowledging the many other intrinsic benefits and motivations behind hosting such events – including health, wellbeing, prestige and cultural enrichment – the review found very limited evidence to justify claims of stimulating local economic growth. “Longer-term economic benefits are an increasingly cited reason for hosting major sporting and cultural events and facilities. And yet, it appears that in many instances, there is no empirical basis for these particular claims,” said Professor Henry Overman, Director of the What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth

    This article appeared in Rochdale Online on 7 July 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Max Nathan webpage
    What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth webpage

    Monday 07 July 2014

    FT.com: Sports events no big score for local economies, study finds

    London’s new Wembley Stadium lifted house prices in the area by 15 per cent, while the announcement of the Olympics coming to London pushed up values within three miles of the stadium by 5 per cent. But there is little evidence of job creation from sports events and facilities, while evidence of an uplift in wages is mixed, says the study by the What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth, a collaboration of the London School of Economics, the Centre for Cities and Arup. Any tourism or trade import benefit is likely to be short-lived, say researchers. They reviewed 36 big sports and culture events and facilities, including two Fifa World Cup tournaments, four Olympic Games, the Super Bowl, the rugby and cricket world cups and regular season basketball and American football games.

    This article appeared in the FT.com on 7 July 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Max Nathan webpage
    What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth webpage

    Sunday 06 July 2014

    The Sunday Express: 'Use green belt to fix housing land shortage'

    The Government's Help to Buy scheme was also helping first time buyers move into the market, she added but Prof. Cheshire rejected the measures as ''putting fingers in dykes''. ''The help to buy scheme is simply a recipe for increasing house prices. It has no other effect because supply is so inelastic,'' he said. ''The crisis in our housing market is absolutely and undeniably about lack of supply. The most important single factor to this is the planning system and the restriction on development for 60 years. There is no alternative but to reconsider greenbelt land. We have to increase supply of housing land and that cannot be done on brownfield sites alone because there is surprisingly few of them and they are not in the right places were the demand for housing is.''

    This article was published in The Sunday Express on July 6, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website


    Friday 04 July 2014

    Hispanic Business.com: United Kingdom: Deputy Prime Minister announces Northern Futures project

    The Northern Futures project is a new approach to policymaking which means that rather than decisions being made by politicians and civil servants in Whitehall, the power is given to the people who live and work there. ... The call for ideas is open to people from all walks of life - businesses, civic leaders, experts in housing, transport and science, academics, students. The following people are already on board: Tom Riordan, Leeds City Council, John Mothersole, Sheffield City Council, Sir Richard Lease and Sir Howard Bernstein, Manchester City Council, Alexandra Jones, Centre for Cities, Hakim Yadi, Northern Health Sciences Alliance, Tom Bloxham MBE, Urban Splash, Henry Overman, London School of Economics, Jim O'Neill, RSA City Growth Commission, Julia Unwin, Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

    This article was published by Hispanicbusiness.com on July 4, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage

    Wednesday 02 July 2014

    Cornish Guardian: Complaint about turbine booklet

    A wind farm developer has agreed to stop distributing a booklet which was given to residents in the parish of St Enoder after a complaint was made to the Advertising Standard Authority (ASA). The complaint to ASA argued whether a claim in the booklet that the impact of turbines on house prices diminishes as time goes on was misleading, and whether it could be substantiated. The claims were made despite the publication of a nationwide study in January by the London School of Economics (LSE), which reviewed more than a million homes located near large wind farms over a 12-year period, and found property values fell by 11 per cent.

    This article was published in the Cornish Guardian on July 2, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014

    Related Links
    Steve Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 01 July 2014

    SERC Book Published: Urban Economics and Urban Policy

    Urban Economics and Urban Policy

    A new book by Paul Cheshire, Max Nathan and Henry Overman

    Endorsements:

    'A tour de force' Michael Storper, LSE

    'Bold, exciting and eminently readable' Ed Glaeser, Harvard

    In many countries across the world, cities are experiencing an economic and social resurgence. But this resurgence hides profoundly uneven development, and spatial disparities have proved resistant to policymakers' attempts to reduce them. Urban Economics and Urban Policy sets out the insights that recent economic research brings to our understanding of cities, and the lessons for urban policymaking. The book helps explain why economic development has emerged so unevenly across space, and why these patterns tend to persist. The authors argue that future urban policies need to take better account of the economic forces that drive unevenness, and that their success should be judged by their impact on people, not places.

    The book draws on the growing global body of literature on spatial economics and economic geography, and in particular the urban research programmes at SERC and LSE. It should prove to be an invaluable resource and a rewarding read for academics, practitioners and policymakers interested in the economics of urban policy, urban planning and development, as well as international studies and innovation.

    To download the first chapter or to order the full book online, please visit the following SERC publications page.



    Monday 30 June 2014

    BBC Parliament: Communities and Local Government Questions

    Barry Sheerman MP mentioned LSE report which highlighted percentage of greenbelt land which could be used for housing.

    The broadcast was made by BBC Parliament on June 30, 2014

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Monday 23 June 2014

    FT.com: 'Crossrail of the North' suggested to boost economic integration

    Henry Overman, a London School of Economics professor who authored the report, has continued to lobby for ''agglomeration'' of big northern cities. Prof Overman said recently that reducing travel time between Leeds and Manchester would boost wages by attracting better quality workers. ''Our largest estimate - for a 20-minute reduction in train journey times between Leeds and Manchester - has average wages increasing by between 1.06 per cent and 2.7 per cent,'' he said. ''The composition of the workforce is different in larger, better-connected places.'' He has argued against the HS2 north-south high-speed rail line, pointing out that the impact of knocking 20 minutes off the Manchester-Leeds journey is estimated to be three times that of a 40-minute reduction for travel from Leeds to London.

    This article was published in the FT.com on June 23, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    The economic future of British cities, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website


    Thursday 19 June 2014

    Daily Mail: Cameron pledges to fight UK's dementia timebomb

    Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said discovering a treatment to delay the onset of dementia by just 36 months would save the country as much as £5billion a year. Mr Cameron will claim there is a 'market failure', with scientists and drug companies having no incentive to prioritise dementia research.

    This article was published in the Daily Mail on June 19, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Thursday 19 June 2014

    Financial Times: Sacrifice the greenbelt to fix the broken property market

    As Prof Paul Cheshire points out in London School of Economics journal Centrepiece, more of the county of Surrey is devoted to golf courses than houses. Just 10 per cent of England is built up, and gardens cover nearly half of that area. Meanwhile a child in inner London derives no benefit from the existence of greenbelt land several miles away.

    This article was published in the Financial Times on June 19, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece - Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of the British Planning, Paul Cheshire, LSE British Politics and Policy Blog, posted May 7, 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 17 June 2014

    Bloomberg BusinessWeek: Crest Nicholson CEO says housing policy 'tinkering'

    Stephen Stone, chief executive officer of Crest Nicholson Holdings Plc and Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at London School of Economics, discuss U.K. property prices, planning laws and building on green-belt land. They speak with Anna Edwards and Mark Barton on Bloomberg Television's ''Countdown''.

    This article was published by Bloomberg BusinessWeek on June 17, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website


    Monday 16 June 2014

    Guardian online - Dave Hill's London Blog: Boris Johnson: brown fields and green elephants

    According to Professor Paul Cheshire, you could build 1.6 million homes at average densities if just a fraction of that greenbelt space, much of it riding schools and golf courses, were reclassified.

    This article was published in the guardian.co.uk Dave Hill's London Blog on June 16, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website


    Friday 13 June 2014

    TransportXtra: Transport debate 'damaged by dubious job creation claims'

    In a keynote paper to last week's Modelling World conference, Henry Overman said much greater discipline needed to be imposed on the claims made by policy-makers about transport investment's impact on the economy.

    This article was published online by TransportXtra on June 13, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Henry Overman CEP Publications webpage

    Wednesday 11 June 2014

    BBC Radio 4: Housing: Where will we all live?

    A debate on why Britain is failing to build enough homes and how best to fix the problem which was held at LSE. Speakers included Paul Cheshire.

    This programme was first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on June 11, 2014
    Link to broadcast here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Friday 06 June 2014

    BBC Radio 4: World at One

    Paul Cheshire talks about the housing crisis.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4 on the World at One show on June 6, 2014
    Link to programme here

    Also on:
    Heart Northampton
    BBC Radio 2
    BBC Cornwall
    BBC Leicester
    BBC Manchester
    BBC Merseyside
    BBC Cambridgeshire
    Downtown Radio Belfast
    BBC London 94.9
    BBC Wales
    BBC Radio 5 Live
    BBC Radio Scotland

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 04 June 2014

    City AM: Britain's housing crisis will morph into catastrophe if politicians don't change, by Paul Cheshire

    THE HOUSING crisis – worst in London, but bad across Britain – is fundamentally driven by lack of supply. For the past five years, we have been building fewer houses than in any peacetime period since before World War One. But house building has been on a downwards trend since the 1960s. Reasonable estimates suggest the shortfall in England has been 1.6m to 2.3m houses between 1994 and 2012. Moreover, too many of those we have built have not been in locations where demand is highest. We persistently build houses where they are relatively most affordable and job prospects are relatively worst.

    This article appeared in City AM on 4 June 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece - Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Friday 30 May 2014

    Huffington Post Politics (UK): Are immigrants really undermining the wages of low-paid Britons?

    A London School of Economics study in 2009 concluded that ''migrants have a significant, small, negative impact on average wages'', adding that it tended to have the biggest impact on the semi/unskilled services sector.

    This article was printed online by Huffington Post Politics (UK) on May 30, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'The Impact of Immigration on Occupational Wages: Evidence from Britain', Stephen Nickell and Jumana Saleheen, SERC Discussion Paper No.34, October 2009

    Related links
    Stephen Nickell CEP publications webpage
    SERC (Spatial Economics Research Centre) website

    Wednesday 28 May 2014

    Local Government Chronicle: Commission on country growth calls for evidence

    LGA names members of panel that will assess role of non-metropolitan areas. The independent commission will be chaired by Sir John Peace, chair of Nottinghamshire's local growth board and of Standard Chartered PLC and Burberry. Other commissioners will include Lady Cobham, chair of VisitEngland, Sir Tony Hawkhead, chief executive of Action for Children and Professor Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics. The commission has launched a public call for evidence and wants to hear from business leaders, voluntary and faith groups and public service leaders.

    This article was published by the Local Government Chronicle on May 28, 2014
    A pdf copy of the article can be downloaded from here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Wednesday 21 May 2014

    City A.M.: The UK housing market needs Help to Supply - not Help to Buy

    THE UK housing market needs Help to Supply, not Help to Buy. The government's housing scheme has helped first-time buyers get a leg-up onto the property ladder, but that privilege has come at a price - with house prices higher than otherwise, as the subsidy became capitalised in prices. Paul Cheshire, emeritus professor at the LSE, has shown how building on greenbelt would only have to be very modest in order to provide more than enough land for housing for generations to come.

    This article was published in City A.M. on May 21, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) webpage

    Wednesday 21 May 2014

    The Guardian: Six reasons why we should build on the green belt

    The fourth reason given for building on the green belt:

    It encourages inequality
    The green belt increases social inequality by acting as a wall that confines urban dwellers at increasingly higher densities. Prof Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics described it as ''a very British form of discriminatory zoning, keeping the urban unwashed out of the home counties - and, of course, helping to turn houses into investment assets instead of places to live''.

    This article was published in The Guardian on May 21, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) webpage

    Thursday 15 May 2014

    SERC Blog: Building Reliant Robin Houses adds to our Housing Crisis, by Paul Cheshire

    We all know there is a housing crisis. The latest data show that on the best measure of affordability (the price of a house mid-way in the price range relative to earnings mid-way in the range), the national position is half 1997 levels and not a lot better than at the worst point in 2007. The debate about causes is full of myths, many self-serving - such as the claim that we are in danger of concreting over England. As I showed in a recent article, the reality is that Greenbelts cover more than 1.5 times all our built- up areas put together. Surrey has more land for golf courses (2.65%) than for actual houses (2.06%).

    This article appeared on the SERC Blog on 15 May 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 14 May 2014

    BBC Berkshire: News

    Paul Cheshire discusses need for more housing on greenbelts.

    This interview was broadcast by BBC Berkshire on May 14, 2014
    No link available.

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website


    Wednesday 14 May 2014

    The Economist: Why London's house prices are soaring

    As professor Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics points out, in the five years to 2013 twice as many houses were built in Doncaster and Barnsley - two struggling northern towns - than in Oxford and Cambridge, which are thriving.

    This article was published by The Economist on May 14, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Tuesday 13 May 2014

    Guardian.co.uk: London housing crisis: who dares to brown the greenbelt?

    I liked Paul Cheshire's diagnosis of Britain's housing affordability crisis from the off: When things go wrong it is always handy to blame foreigners and currently even the liberal press are blaming them for our crisis of housing affordability. Aren't we just, especially where London is concerned? That, and complaining about the skyline while all over the city kids are sleeping on sofas because there aren't enough bedrooms in their homes.

    This article appeared in The Guardian on 13 May 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning , Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 13 May 2014

    The Daily Telegraph: Enough is enough, we need higher interest rates now

    In the 1970s and 80s, some 4.3m new homes were built in Britain. In the subsequent two decades, the numbers plummeted to 2.7m. To stabilise affordability in the areas of the country people have to live and work — twice as many houses were built in Doncaster and Barnsley, where prices have been falling steeply, in the five years to 2013 than in Oxford and Cambridge, where prices are rising strongly — requires return to previous levels of house building. As an economy, we’ve not been building enough housing for 30 years or more. I take these statistics from an article by Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, in the LSE’s CentrePiece magazine.

    This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 13 May 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Monday 12 May 2014

    The Guardian: Why house prices are so expensive in the UK, article by Paul Cheshire

    We all know there is a housing crisis. The latest data shows that, on the best measure of affordability, a typical house is half as affordable as it was in 1997 and not a lot more affordable than at the worst point in 2007. The debate about causes is full of myths, some of them extremely self-serving, such as the claim that we are in danger of concreting over England. As I showed in a recent article, the reality is that the green belt covers more land than all our built-up areas put together, and golf courses take up more land in Surrey (2.65%) than houses do (2.06%).

    This article appeared in the Guardian on 12 May 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    "Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning" Paul Cheshire. Article from forthcoming CentrePiece - Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Sunday 11 May 2014

    Guardian.co.uk: UK property market - what will the Bank of England do next?

    In the long run, the answer to Britain's out-of-kilter housing market is an increase in the supply of homes. Paul Cheshire, an academic at the London School of Economics, says there has been a slowdown in the number of new homes built: from 4.3m in the two decades covering the 1970s and 1980s to 2.7m.

    This article was published online by guardian.co.uk on May 11, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website


    Sunday 11 May 2014

    The Sunday Times Online: Economic Outlook: House price hysteria is not justified — for now

    Nipping it in the bud too soon, despite justifiable concerns about house prices in some areas, could backfire. Professor Paul Cheshire, in a spirited piece for the London School of Economics' CentrePiece magazine, estimates that from 1994 to 2012 between 1.6m and 2.3m fewer houses were built than were needed.

    This article was published in The Sunday Times on May 11, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Friday 02 May 2014

    Planning resource: Housing affordability crisis blamed on green belt policy

    Green belt polices that aim to keep ''the urban unwashed out of the Home Counties'' are causing a housing affordability crisis, according to a London School of Economics (LSE) professor. Britain's booming house prices have been caused by ''decades of planning policies that constrain the supply of houses and land'', according to a study by Paul Cheshire, professor emeritus of economic geography at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance.

    This article was published by Planningresource online on May 2, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Thursday 01 May 2014

    tutor2u.net: UK Housing Industry: Turning Houses into Gold!

    Britain's crisis of housing affordability is nothing to do with foreign speculators, according to Paul Cheshire writing in the Spring 2014 issue of CentrePiece magazine. Rather, it is a result of decades of misguided planning policies that constrain the supply of land and turn houses into something like gold or artworks. Houses have been converted from places in which to live into people's most important financial asset.

    This article was posted online by tutor2u.net on May 1, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article from forthcoming CentrePiece - Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Monday 28 April 2014

    Inside Housing.co.uk: More of Surrey devoted to golf than housing

    More of Surrey is now devoted to golf courses than housing, new research branding the green belt 'discriminatory zoning' has found.

    This article was published by Inside Housing.co.uk on April 28, 2014
    Link to article here. [Subscription needed to access complete article.]

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website


    Sunday 27 April 2014

    Daily Mail: Golf takes more land in Surrey than houses

    More land in Surrey is dedicated to playing golf rather than housing, new research has shown. Prof Paul Cheshire, researcher at the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the LSE said green belts were driving up the price of houses and subsidising activities such as golf Prof Cheshire said in London alone there was enough green belt land to build an estimated 1.6 million new homes with average densities. He said the land bank was about 32,500 hectares and could have an impact on the cost of homes in the region.

    This article appeared in the Daily Mail on 27 April 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Turning Houses Into Gold: The Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire April 2014, in CentrePiece, volume 19 issue 1

    Related Links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC webpage

    Sunday 27 April 2014

    The Observer: Why Surrey has more land for golf courses than for homes

    A study by the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE suggests soaring house prices are not caused by an influx of foreign buyers but are down to restrictive planning policies that have ensured the country's green belt is a form of "discriminatory zoning, keeping the urban unwashed out of the home counties". Paul Cheshire, professor emeritus of economic geography at LSE and a researcher at the Spatial Economics Research Centre, has produced data showing that restrictive planning laws have turned houses in the south-east into valuable assets in an almost equivalent way to artworks. He points out that twice as many houses were built in Doncaster and Barnsley in the five years to 2013 than in Oxford and Cambridge

    This article appeared in the Observer on 27 April 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Turning Houses Into Gold: The Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire April 2014, in CentrePiece, volume 19 issue 1

    Related Links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC webpage

    Wednesday 23 April 2014

    Western Daily Press: Wind farms 'slashing house prices by half' in Devon

    ''Recently there have been reports published by the LSE (London School of Economics) concluding that house values within close proximity of a wind farm are reduced by up to 11 per cent - however, here on the ground in Devon when houses are near a single wind turbine, estate agents are recommending huge discounts of between 40 and 50 per cent in some cases - if they're saleable at all,'' said Mrs Mills.

    This article was published in the Western Daily Press on April 23, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014 Related Links
    Steve Gibbons webpage
    SERC website


    Thursday 10 April 2014

    Quartz: One way to stop surging British house prices - build more wind farms

    A new research paper highlights one way to keep property prices in check - put up some wind turbines in the neighborhood. Stephen Gibbons of the London School of Economics (LSE) looked at property sales since 2000 and found that house prices within 8 kilometers (5 miles) of visible wind farms were lower than those nearby but out of sight of the turbines. Average prices were up to 6 percent lower in areas with a visible wind farm within 2 kilometers, and the effect gets worse the more turbines dot the horizon - prices were 12 percent lower if 20 or more turbines were visible within that range.

    This article was published online by Quartz on April 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines Through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014


    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 08 April 2014

    guardian.co.uk: Windfarms can reduce house prices by up to 12%, says LSE

    Large windfarms can knock as much as 12 percent off the values of homes within a 2km radius, and reduce property prices as far as 14km away, according to research by the London School of Economics. The findings contrast sharply with a report by the Centre for Economics and Business Research in March, which found no negative impact on property prices within a 5km radius of a turbine.

    This article was published online by guardian.co.uk on April 8, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014 Related Links
    Steve Gibbons webpage
    SERC website


    Thursday 03 April 2014

    BBC News - Business: Move over, GDP: How should you measure a country's value?

    There have been several other attempts at complementing or replacing GDP. Sir Gus O'Donnell explains the impact wellbeing research is having on policy. The UN implemented the human development index, the OECD has a ''better life index'' and even the UK's own Office for National Statistics measures national wellbeing. Recently, Sir Gus O'Donnell, a former senior civil servant in the UK, published a wellbeing and policy report, which investigated the main economic, social and personal drivers of happiness. ... But there are those who resist the idea that GDP cannot map welfare. Nick Oulton, of the London School of Economics, argues that economic growth can be a good measure of a country's wellbeing. ''It won't solve all problems, but a rise in wealth can lead to declines in infant mortality, increased life expectancy, and people getting healthier because they can afford to eat more food,'' he says.

    This article was published online by BBC News - Business on April 3, 2014
    Link to article here

    Also in
    UK Wired News

    Related publications
    'Wellbeing and Policy', Gus O'Donnell, Angus Deaton, Martine Durand, David Halpern and Richard Layard, Legatum Institute Report, March 2014
    Link to report here
    Nicholas Oulton's CEP publications

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Nicholas Oulton webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Thursday 03 April 2014

    The Independent: House prices, waste incinerator plants and wind farms

    Preliminary findings from a report due out later this year from the LSE indicates there is a drop of up to 15 per cent in house value due to nearby wind farms.

    This article was published by The Independent on April 3, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014

    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 01 April 2014

    BusinessGreen.com: Reports: Lib Dems block Conservative onshore wind farm veto

    A new report commissioned by RenewableUK found wind farms have no negative impacts on house prices within a five kilometre radius and can even push up property prices in some parts of the country. The industry report pre-empts the release of a study by Professor Stephen Gibbons at the London School of Economics, which is expected to argue that operational wind farms can reduce house prices by around seven per cent if they are located up to 5km from the wind farm site.

    This article was published online by BusinessGreen.com on April 1, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the wind: valuing the local effects of wind turbines through house prices' by Stephen Gibbons. Draft report link

    Related Links
    Steve Gibbons webpage
    SERC website


    Monday 31 March 2014

    BBC Radio Norfolk: News

    Research by Professor Steve Gibbons cited in a discussion of a new report commissioned by Renewable UK which has concluded that having a wind farm nearby does not affect the value of a house - which contradicts the findings of the report from LSE.

    The interview was broadcast on BBC Radio Norfolk News on March 31, 2014
    No link available.

    Related publications
    'Gone with the wind: valuing the local effects of wind turbines through house prices' by Stephen Gibbons. Draft report link

    Related Links
    Steve Gibbons webpage
    SERC website


    Saturday 29 March 2014

    The Guardian: Property prices unaffected by windfarms, says CEBR

    The CEBR findings contradict separate research by the London School of Economics, which found that if a windfarm is visible from a house, on average it knocks 5-6% off its sale price, and as much as 15%. It suggested that a typical windfarm of 11 turbines would face a bill of £12m to compensate houses within 4km.

    This article was published by the Guardian on March 29, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the wind: valuing the local effects of wind turbines through house prices' by Stephen Gibbons. Draft report link.

    Related Links
    Steve Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Thursday 27 March 2014

    Regeneration and Renewal blog: Apres le SEP, le deluge?

    We probably learnt relatively little new from the LEP Network Annual Conference 2014, held in London this week, but perhaps we saw something(s) quite profound. The conference restated many of the major priorities for next steps in enhancing local leadership of economic growth in England. Similarly, it raised a number of fundamental issues LEPs need to address if they are to become credible principal institutions in this process. Most presentations - including Vince Cable's - were able to highlight a number of individual initiatives they think are innovative and interesting. Whether these will deliver long term sustainable positive economic impact is less clear in these early days. Henry Overman's presentation on the 'What works centre...' encouraged use of, and engagement with, evaluation evidence - with the first of their 'evidence reviews' due for publication next week.

    This article was posted on the Regeneration and Renewal blog on March 27, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage
    What Works Centre for Local Economic Growthwebsite

    Monday 17 March 2014

    Henry Overman Blog: How Unbalanced is Infrastructure Spending?

    Any one reading these reports (especially the first two) would conclude that these figures tell us how existing public expenditure on transport is hugely skewed towards London. This is simply not the case. The best figures we have for the regional distribution of existing public expenditure on transport come from the PESA tables that I quoted above. To repeat, these show "in 2010-11 London received £800 per head (compared to an English average - including London - of around £400). But the second ranked region was the North West with £337 per head.

    This article appeared on Henry Overman's Blog on 17 March 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    The economic future of British cities Henry Overman, June 2013, Paper No' CEPCP389 in CentrePiece Volume 18, issue 1

    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC webpage

    Friday 14 March 2014

    Voice of Russia: London's new high-rise homes: ''We haven't seen anything like this before''

    London's skyline is set for one of its most radical changes ever, with at least 237 tall buildings set to be constructed in the next few decades, says a report for an architecture think-tank, New London Architecture. NLA says approval has already been given for almost half the new blocks most of which will be for residential use, not office space, meaning major changes to the geography of the entire city. But perhaps the most surprising thing about the new developments is that unlike previous ones, Canary Wharf for example, 80 percent of the new blocks will be residential. That's because there's been a surge in demand for housing; prices in the city are now rising by almost 11 percent a year. Professor Christine Whitehead, a housing expert at the London School of Economics says that's because successive governments failed to foresee the success of the capital as a global hub - and didn't build enough housing elsewhere in the South-East: ''We were taken by surprise but it's inherent in a city of London's type and size that unless we can build vastly in the suburbs or the areas outside London, we're going to have a massive housing problem.''

    This article was published online by Voice of Russia on March 14, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Christine Whitehead webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre - SERC - website

    Wednesday 12 March 2014

    City AM: Letters to the Editor

    Joe Valentine makes some nice noises about why mayoral targets and limited planning reform will do little to ease the housing crisis. But she doesn't go far enough. She quotes Paul Cheshire of the LSE, and his calculation that taking a 1km ring of greenbelt land inside the M25 would yield enough land for a generation of house building in London. But Valentine fails to note that Cheshire thinks the greenbelt should disappear entirely – it’s socially exclusive, has little environmental rationale, and benefits the very affluent. It should go altogether

    This article appeared in City AM on 12 March 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC webpage

    Tuesday 11 March 2014

    Blackmore Vale Magazine: Anti-wind turbine campaigner calls meeting at Winterborne Whitechurch

    in property values, which have been estimated in a study by the London School of Economics as an average of 11 per cent for homes within 1.2 miles of a giant turbine.

    This article appeared in Blackmore Vale Magazine on 11 March 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Draft report link
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Monday 10 March 2014

    UK Wired News: The case for making Hebden Bridge the UK's second city

    Britain has a great world city but lacks a great national one. As the eminent economic geographer from the London School of Economics, Henry Overman, puts it: ''These kind of arguments imply that the problem with Britain's urban system is not that London is too big. Instead, if anything, it's that our cities are too small.''

    This article was published online by UK Wired News on March 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The economic future of British cities, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Monday 10 March 2014

    BBC News Online: The case for making Hebden Bridge the UK's second city by Evan Davis

    As the eminent economic geographer from the London School of Economics, Henry Overman, puts it: "These kind of arguments imply that the problem with Britain's urban system is not that London is too big. Instead, if anything, it's that our cities are too small."

    This article appeared on BBC News Online on 10 March 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    The economic future of British cities Henry Overman, June 2013, Paper No' CEPCP389 in CentrePiece Volume 18, issue 1

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC webpage webpage

    Sunday 09 March 2014

    Reuters: Bank of England's Carney faces grilling over foreign exchange scandal

    John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, said a natural extension of Carney's push to improve transparency at the Bank would be to bring more clarity to its internal supervision.

    This article appeared on Reuters on 9 March 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage

    Also in:
    MSN Money link
    Business RSS News link

    Friday 07 March 2014

    La Repubblica: Emerging world poses more danger than in 1990s: Cutting research

    Breakthroughs in information and technology have increased demand and pay for highly skilled and university-educated workers, outpacing the need for employees with middle-range skills, according to the London School of Economics. Technical change accounted for 15 percent to 25 percent of the growth in the aggregate wage bill of highly skilled workers, the study by Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen found. The results were based on employment and wages in 11 countries during the past 25 years. The pay of low-skilled workers was less influenced by developments in technology, it said.

    This article was published by La Repubblica on March 7, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Has ICT Polarized Skill Demand? Evidence from Eleven Countries over Twenty-Five Years, Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen. Article in The Review of Economics and Statistics Volume 96, Issue 1, March 2014
    The shrinking middle, Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
    'Has ICT Polarized Skill Demand? Evidence from Eleven Countries over 25 Years', Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.987, June 2010

    Related links
    Guy Michaels webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Friday 07 March 2014

    La Repubblica: Emerging world poses more danger than in 1990s: Cutting research

    Breakthroughs in information and technology have increased demand and pay for highly skilled and university-educated workers, outpacing the need for employees with middle-range skills, according to the London School of Economics. Technical change accounted for 15 percent to 25 percent of the growth in the aggregate wage bill of highly skilled workers, the study by Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen found. The results were based on employment and wages in 11 countries during the past 25 years. The pay of low-skilled workers was less influenced by developments in technology, it said.

    This article was published by La Repubblica on March 7, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Has ICT Polarized Skill Demand? Evidence from Eleven Countries over Twenty-Five Years, Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen. Article in The Review of Economics and Statistics Volume 96, Issue 1, March 2014
    The shrinking middle, Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
    'Has ICT Polarized Skill Demand? Evidence from Eleven Countries over 25 Years', Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.987, June 2010

    Related links
    Guy Michaels webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Monday 03 March 2014

    Radio Times: Evan Davis: We love big cities because we long to be near other people

    Henry Overman is a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics. He argues that the UK is an unusual country, not so much in the large size of its capital, but in the small size of its second-tier cities.

    This article appeared in the Radio Times on 3 March 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    The economic future of British cities Henry Overman, June 2013, Paper No' CEPCP389 in CentrePiece Volume 18, issue 1

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC webpage

    Monday 03 March 2014

    SERC: Spatial Economics Research Centre blog: Mind the gap

    Henry Overman writes:
    On the Today programme this morning talking cities with Ed Cox (IPPR North) and Evan Davis - whose two part series Mind the Gap London vs the Rest is playing on BBC 2.
    The starting point - on which we all agreed - is that the geographic concentration of economic activity in London and the South East offers fantastic opportunities in terms of both work and play (as a result of 'agglomeration economies' arising from the benefits of physical proximity). The points of disagreement relate to the extent to which this is sustainable and whether it would be possible to generate similar opportunities elsewhere.

    The SERC blog was published online on March 3, 2014
    Link to blog page here

    Related publications
    The economic future of British cities, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website

    Monday 03 March 2014

    BBC Radio 4: Today programme

    8:35am Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, and Ed Cox, director of the Institute for Public Policy Research North, debate why London is such a powerful force in the UK.

    The debate was aired on BBC Radio 4's Today Programme on March 3, 2014
    Link to programme here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Monday 24 February 2014

    BBC2: Horizon TV: How you make decisions

    Professor Paul Dolan featured in Episode 9 of the BBC2 programme - Horizon. The episode was looking at how people really make decisions.
    Every day you make thousands of decisions, big and small, and behind all them is a powerful battle in your mind, pitting intuition against logic. This conflict affects every aspect of your life - from what you eat to what you believe, and especially to how you spend your money. And it turns out that the intuitive part of your mind is a lot more powerful than you may realise.

    The BBC2 Horizon episode was broadcast on February 24, 2014
    Link to BBC iplayer here

    Related links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage

    Monday 24 February 2014

    BBC2: Horizon TV: How you make decisions

    Professor Paul Dolan featured in Episode 9 of the BBC2 programme - Horizon. The episode was looking at how people really make decisions.
    Every day you make thousands of decisions, big and small, and behind all them is a powerful battle in your mind, pitting intuition against logic. This conflict affects every aspect of your life - from what you eat to what you believe, and especially to how you spend your money. And it turns out that the intuitive part of your mind is a lot more powerful than you may realise.

    The BBC2 Horizon episode was broadcast on February 24, 2014
    Link to BBC iplayer here

    Related links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage

    Friday 14 February 2014

    New Republic.com: The Silicon Valley labor scandals prove minimum wage hikes don't cost jobs

    The labor economist Alan Manning, in his book Monopsony in Motion (first chapter), argues that these two elements together means that employers have a small amount of market power over each job out there. This power is like a monopoly power, but the power doesn't come from the size or concentration of the firm but instead from the difficulties of the search.

    This article was published online by New Republic.com on February 14, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    'The Real Thin Theory: Monopsony in Modern Labour Markets', Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.564, May 2003
    Monopsony in Motion: Imperfect Competition in Labor Markets, Alan Manning. Published by Princeton University Press, 2005. Details

    Related Links
    Alan Manning webpage
    Labour Markets webpage

    Tuesday 11 February 2014

    Capital Romania: Zona Bucuresti-Ilfov, mai prospera decat trei sferturi din regiunile UE

    Trebuie spus ca statisticile privind PIB-ul pe cap de locuitor nu tin seama de un fenomen foarte raspandit in jurul marilor orase din Vest si destul de comun si in zona adiacenta Bucurestiului – navetismul. La produsul intern brut din Londra, Luxemburg, Praga sau Bucuresti-Ilfov contribuie zeci, daca nu sute de mii de persoane care lucreaza acolo, dar locuiesc in alte regiuni adiacente. Conform unui studiu realizat de Paul Chesire, de la London School of Economics, si Stefano Magrini, de la Universitatea din Venetia, ''PIB per capita este unul din indicatorii cu cele mai mari sanse de a fi distorsionat, avand in vedere ca PIB-ul este estimat la locul de munc, iar oamenii sunt numarati acolo unde locuiesc. Din cauza navetismului dincolo de limitele administrative, rezulta ca PIB per capita este sistematic supraestimat in marile orase care sunt si regiuni statistice''.

    It must be said that the statistics on GDP per capita does not take into account a widespread phenomenon around major cities in the West and quite common and in the adjacent area of Bucharest-commuting within. The gross domestic product in London, Luxembourg, Prague or Bucharest-Ilfov contributes dozens if not hundreds of thousands of people who work there, but live in adjacent regions. According to a study by Paul Cheshire, from London School of Economics, and Stefano Magrini, of the University of Venice, ''per capita GDP is one of the indicators with the greatest chance of being distorted, given that GDP is estimated at work, and people are counted where they are staying. Because of the commuting process beyond administrative boundaries, shows that the per capita GDP is systematically overestimated in big cities which are statistical regions''.

    The article was published by Capital Romania on February 11, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Urban Growth Drivers in a Europe of Sticky People and Implicit Boundaries', Paul Cheshire and Stefano Magrini, Spatial Economics Research Centre Discussion Paper No.10, November 2008

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Monday 10 February 2014

    The Conversation: Why the government shouldn't privatise the student loan book

    The announcement that the government intends to sell off part of the student loan book is perhaps no surprise, but it is bad economics. Debt from student loans is currently a groaning £46.6 billion on the government's balance sheet. The government has already made very clear its intent to further privatise the UK's higher education system. The argument is simple. They want to convert an extended stream of income from student loan repayments - which are paid by graduates at a small proportion of their income each month, thus drip-feeding repayment to the government for up to 30 years into the future - into a one-time payment now. This would immediately lower the public debt number. It is a simple move of income in the future to income today. But the truth is that selling the student loans book in this fashion is bad for students, bad for taxpayers, and may even undermine the entire ethos of the higher education finance system.

    This article was published by The Conversation on February 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Gill Wyness webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Monday 10 February 2014

    The Conversation: Why the government shouldn't privatise the student loan book

    The announcement that the government intends to sell off part of the student loan book is perhaps no surprise, but it is bad economics. Debt from student loans is currently a groaning £46.6 billion on the government's balance sheet. The government has already made very clear its intent to further privatise the UK's higher education system. The argument is simple. They want to convert an extended stream of income from student loan repayments - which are paid by graduates at a small proportion of their income each month, thus drip-feeding repayment to the government for up to 30 years into the future - into a one-time payment now. This would immediately lower the public debt number. It is a simple move of income in the future to income today. But the truth is that selling the student loans book in this fashion is bad for students, bad for taxpayers, and may even undermine the entire ethos of the higher education finance system.

    This article was published by The Conversation on February 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Gill Wyness webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Monday 10 February 2014

    The Conversation: Why the government shouldn't privatise the student loan book

    The announcement that the government intends to sell off part of the student loan book is perhaps no surprise, but it is bad economics. Debt from student loans is currently a groaning £46.6 billion on the government's balance sheet. The government has already made very clear its intent to further privatise the UK's higher education system. The argument is simple. They want to convert an extended stream of income from student loan repayments - which are paid by graduates at a small proportion of their income each month, thus drip-feeding repayment to the government for up to 30 years into the future - into a one-time payment now. This would immediately lower the public debt number. It is a simple move of income in the future to income today. But the truth is that selling the student loans book in this fashion is bad for students, bad for taxpayers, and may even undermine the entire ethos of the higher education finance system.

    This article was published by The Conversation on February 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Gill Wyness webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Friday 07 February 2014

    i: Rental revolution about to arrive, as help-to-buy puts more people on the ladder

    market are starting to move their attention beyond London to the regions where, as our index shows, yields are higher." Wind farms and property rates A new study by the London School of Economics due out later this month is expected to show that house values near large wind farms have fallen by around 11 per cent over the last….

    This article appeared in i on the 7 February 2014 (no link available)

    Related Links
    Draft report Link to article
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Monday 03 February 2014

    Western Morning News: WMN Letters: Wind farm study confirms the obvious

    A recent study by the London School of Economics (to be published during February this year), which looked at 150 wind farms across England and Wales over a period of 12 years...

    This article appeared in Western Morning News on 3 February 2014 link to article

    Related Links Draft report link
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Thursday 30 January 2014

    Cornish Guardian: 'Wind turbines are slashing house prices by 20% in St Enoder...

    property trickier to sell.” A nationwide study published last week by the London School of Economics (LSE) reviewed more than a million homes located near large wind farms over a 12-year and found their property values fell by 11 per cent.

    This article appeared in the Cornish Guardian on 30 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Draft report link
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Thursday 30 January 2014

    National Wind Watch: Wind Energy News: ‘Wind turbines are slashing house prices by 20% in St Enoder parish'

    property trickier to sell.” A nationwide study published last week by the London School of Economics (LSE) reviewed more than a million homes located near large wind farms over a 12-year period, and found their property values fell by 11 per cent...

    This article appeared in National Wind Watch: Wind Energy News on 30 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Draft report link
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Thursday 30 January 2014

    RAC Magazine: Scientists call for push on energy storage

    former UK chief scientific advisor, Lord Richard Layard, programme director at the London School of Economics, and Mark Maslin, professor of climatology at University College London, called for a campaign to secure international renewable energy storage funding.

    This article appeared on RAC Magazine on 30 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    Thursday 30 January 2014

    RAC Magazine: Scientists call for push on energy storage

    former UK chief scientific advisor, Lord Richard Layard, programme director at the London School of Economics, and Mark Maslin, professor of climatology at University College London, called for a campaign to secure international renewable energy storage funding.

    This article appeared on RAC Magazine on 30 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    Tuesday 28 January 2014

    The Carbon Brief (Blog): Mail takes gloomiest view of how windfarms affect house prices

    Mail takes gloomiest view of how windfarms affect house prices Professor Stephen Gibbons, director of the spatial economics research centre at LSE, is in the process of producing a new analysis. His draft paper finds that if more than 20 wind turbines are erected within two kilometres of a house, its value is reduced by about 11 per cent. But it also notes that this is an "extreme case" because homes are rarely situated so close to windfarms.

    This article appeared in the Carbon Brief on 28 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Draft report link
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Monday 27 January 2014

    Spatial Economics Research Centre - blog: Cities outlook 2014: Would UK cities be better off without London?

    Blog posted by Prof Henry G. Overman
    Great to see Centre for Cities latest 'Cities Outlook' report published today. This year, as well as providing a whole range of up-to-date statistics for Britain's cities, the report focuses on London's relationship with the rest of the UK. ... Recognising the importance of size creates all sorts of problems about which places to focus on outside of London. CfC's report dodges the dilemma by making the case for greater localism for all cities. Most politicians choose to behave likewise, focussing on creating opportunities across Britain. But what if reducing the reliance of Britain on London requires us to significantly increase the size of just one or two other cities? Which cities will they be and how will we help them grow? I don't claim to have the answers, but I at least think we should be asking the question.

    The blog piece was posted on the Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) blog on January 27, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website

    Sunday 26 January 2014

    The Daily Mail: Proof wind turbines take thousands off your home: Value of houses within 1.2 miles of large wind farms slashed by 11%, study finds

    The study by the London School of Economics (LSE) – which looked at more than a million sales of properties close to wind farm sites over a 12-year period – found that values of homes within 1.2 miles of large wind farms were being slashed by about 11 per cent.

    This artilce appeared in the Daily Mail on 26 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Draft report link
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Wednesday 22 January 2014

    The Financial Times: Protests over axing of 'vital' land price statistics

    In a letter to chancellor George Osborne and business secretary Vince Cable, signatories including Kate Barker - author of a 2004 Labour-commissioned review of housing supply - warn that the decision by the Valuation Office Agency to stop collecting and publishing land price data ''makes it much harder for government to understand the consequences of current policy interventions or to assess the case for future reform''. ... signatories to the letter include Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics.

    The article was published in The Financial Times - Politics and Policy - on January 22, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Wednesday 22 January 2014

    Adaptation, Green Growth and Urbanization Workshop: 28th-29th January 2014

    LSE’s Grantham Research Institute and the Spatial Economics Research Centre invite you to a joint workshop on adaptation, green growth and urbanization.

    The purpose of the workshop is to bring together work (final or in-progress) addressing key questions and applying innovative methods and approaches at the frontier of adaptation, green growth and urbanisation research.

    The workshop will consist of four sessions, arranged according to four major perspectives (development and growth; spatial; natural hazards; and policy), two key note speakerships and a roundtable with practitioners. For more information including the agenda and how to register, please visit our events page



    Tuesday 14 January 2014

    SERC News: International Growth Centre Lecture

    Ed Glaeser is giving this year’s International Growth Centre public lecture on 20 January, 6:30 at LSE. More details here

    Saturday 04 January 2014

    The Telegraph (web): HS2: Government ministers sat on critical report by Department for Transport

    The report, by the accountants KPMG, has been repeatedly quoted by ministers - including the Chancellor, George Osborne - to defend their £43 billion scheme... The KPMG research has already been substantially discredited, with one former member of the Government's HS2 advisory panel, Prof Henry Overman, saying it was ''technically wrong'' and ''essentially made up''.

    This article was published online by the Telegraph on January 4, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece 16 (3) Winter 2012


    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC Programme website

    Thursday 21 November 2013

    Guardian: Research will create policy that encourages local economic growth

    LSE what works centre and the government will together drive evidence to the heart of policymaking. Article by Henry Overman
    What can policy do to increase local economic growth? This question continues to perplex and challenge policymakers and academics. In a period where government is faced with slow growth and is considering how best to devolve power, the question has assumed increased importance. Careful research and evaluation are crucial to answering it. Understanding and assessing evidence is not always easy for policymakers facing the day-to-day challenge of delivering better economic outcomes for their communities. This is where the recently established what works centre for local economic growth comes in. The centre, a collaboration between the LSE, the Centre for Cities and Arup, will review policy areas such as employment, skills, housing and regeneration and will provide policymakers with the evidence and insights they need to design and deliver services that will drive local economic growth and employment.

    This article was published by the Guardian on November 21, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Saturday 16 November 2013

    Daily Telegraph: HS2 is bad value, and that's a fact

    HS2 is poor value for money compared with other transport plans, and may well be poor value for money compared with alternatives that address exactly the same set of problems.

    This article was published in the Daily Telegraph on November 16, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC Programme website

    Tuesday 12 November 2013

    BBC Radio 2 - Today Programme: Lord Heseltine: HS2 can 'regenerate' areas

    Lord Heseltine has come out fighting in favour of the HS2 high speed rail project. In a speech on Tuesday, the former Conservative Cabinet minister said supporting HS2 is as much an act of faith as a reliance on figures, and the UK ''must consider carefully the cost of not acting'' over HS2. Professor Henry Overman, a former member of the HS2 analytical challenge panel, believes ''on the balance of the evidence we've got available to us, HS2 remains not particularly good value for money compared to other transport projects.''

    The interview was broadcast on BBC Radio 2's Today Programme on November 12, 2013
    Link to piece here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website


    Monday 11 November 2013

    City AM: The Greenbelt sacred cow: It pens in the poor for no environmental gain

    Article by Paul Cheshire
    While research I did in the 1980s showed that there was a small but measurable value of Greenbelts for people who lived near them, recent research by colleagues at the London School of Economics, using data on more than 1m house transactions, showed this had gone.

    Thsi article was published in City AM on November 11, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    SERC blog - Should we build on the Green Belt?, Henry Overman, 29 June 2013

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 06 November 2013

    Financial Times: KPMG defends key HS2 report

    However, concerns about the KPMG report, surfaced when the FT revealed misgivings about it among some of the government's own advisers. Dan Graham, a professor of statistical modelling at Imperial College London, told the committee of MPs on Tuesday ''I don't think the statistical work is reliable''. Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics and a former adviser on HS2, went further. ''They [KPMG] apply this procedure which is essentially made up, which provides them with an estimate. It is something that really shouldn't be done in a situation where we are trying to inform public debate using statistical analysis.'' Prof Overman said he thought the £15bn estimate could be overstated by a factor of six to eight.

    This article was published by the Financial Times online on November 6, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 06 November 2013

    Mail online UK (web): 15bn boost from HS2 is a sham, MPs are told

    Calculations used by ministers to justify the controversial £50billion high-speed rail scheme were 'essentially made up', a former Government adviser told Treasury watchdogs yesterday. Professor Henry Overman was one of a number of academics giving testimony to MPs which undermined the ministerial case for the 351-mile HS2 line from London to Birmingham and the North. Government-commissioned accountants denied 'cherrypicking' figures to over-egg the benefits of the scheme. But Professor Overman, who specialises in economic geography at the London School of Economics, said he had resigned from the Government's high-speed rail advisory panel after believing its role had changed from giving independent advice to actively promoting the controversial project.

    This article was published online by mail online UK on November 6, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 06 November 2013

    i (the paper for today): GBP15bn HS2 benefit has no 'statistical basis', MPs told

    ''I don't think the statistical work [in the KPMG report] is reliable. There are problems with the numbers they have generated.'' Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, said that there was ''no statistical basis'' for the KPMG £15bn annual benefit figure.

    The article was published in i (the paper for today) on November 6, 2013
    [No link available]

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 06 November 2013

    City AM: Experts pour cold water on HS2 benefits

    £15bn a year for the British economy, and Treasury select committee chair Andrew Tyrie said afterwards that the claim ''has no firm statistical foundation''. Henry Overman, a professor at the London School of Economics who formerly advised the government on HS2, said KPMG, which provided the forecast, ''applied this procedure which is essentially made up''.

    This article was published in City AM on November 6, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 06 November 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: HS2 benefits are made up, MPs told

    The £50billion HS2 scheme were ''essentially made up'' a former member of Whitehall's high speed rail advisory panel has told MPs. Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics said he had quit the panel after he felt its role changed from providing independent advice to promoting the project.

    This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on November 6, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Thursday 24 October 2013

    Research Centre Launch: What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth

    A ground-breaking new project that will analyse and showcase the policies that can help to drive local economic growth has been launched at a national event with Kris Hopkins MP, Minister for Local Growth, Michael Fallon MP, Minister for Business, and Joanna Killian, Chief Executive of Essex County Council.

    The What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth, a partnership between LSE, Centre for Cities and Arup, will put evaluations of the policies that matter to growth - skills, regeneration, housing and employment - under the spotlight to give local decision makers the evidence they need about which policies work. It will improve evaluation standards so that we can learn more about what policies are most effective and where, and it will work with local partners to set up a series of demonstrator projects to show how effective evaluation can work in practice.

    Professor Henry Overman, Director of the Centre, said: "The evidence base covering local growth policy areas like skills, housing and employment is huge and this can be overwhelming for policymakers. The What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth will help local decision makers use the available evidence to make better informed decisions about which policies are most likely to drive local growth and where."

    Read full story on LSE news webpage



    Saturday 19 October 2013

    MSN UK (Web): Cities 'could lose £220m' over HS2

    Professor Henry Overman from the London School of Economics - formerly an expert adviser to HS2 Ltd - told the BBC it was obvious that, as some cities, towns and regions reap the benefits of being better connected.

    This article appeared on MSN UK (Web) on October 19, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Saturday 19 October 2013

    BBC web: High-speed rail 'losers' revealed

    ...to Birmingham and to Manchester and Leeds. The Department for Transport say ultimately the line would reduce journey times to Edinburgh and Glasgow by an hour. Professor Henry Overman from the London School of Economics - formerly an expert adviser to HS2 Ltd - told the BBC it was obvious that, as some cities, towns and regions reap the benefits of being better connected, other places away from the line will pay a price.

    This news article appeared on the BBC news website on October 19, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Saturday 19 October 2013

    The Sunday Express (Scotland): Scots lose out in HS2 rail bonanza

    Professor Henry Overman from the London School of Economics - formerly an expert adviser to HS2 Ltd - told Newsnight it was obvious that, as some cities, towns and regions reap the benefits of being better connected, other places away from the line will pay a price.

    The article was published in The Sunday Express (Scotland) on October 19, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Saturday 19 October 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: Towns not on HS2 line will lose out

    Henry Overman, professor in economic geography at the London School of Economics, told BBC's Newsnight: ''If you are on the line, you get a productivity improvement.''

    This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on October 19, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 09 October 2013

    Time: London's tale of two cities: inequality worsens in Europe's booming metropolis

    In London, Europe's fastest growing city, the problem is made uniquely more acute by the constraints of its metropolitan green belt - an inviolable stretch of green land that rings the city, designed to prevent urban sprawl. Paul Cheshire, professor Emeritus of economic geography at the London School of Economics, describes it as ''a peculiarly English form of exclusionary zoning'' and argues in a piece for the news website the Conversation that it is in part to blame for the housing crisis.

    This article was published in Time on October 9, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Sunday 15 September 2013

    The Sunday Telegraph: HS2 will clog up the rail system, warns freight expert

    Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, described the KPMG report as ''technically wrong'' in parts of analysis and ''possibly out by orders of magnitude'' in its results. ''I can imagine why the Government rushed this report out but it would appear to add very little, if anything, to the debate'', he said.

    The article was published in The Sunday Telegraph on September 15, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 10 September 2013

    Financial Times: Foreign players in the property game

    For Henry Overman, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, there is a simple explanation for London's house prices: ''you just need to do the maths.'' ''In the [2011] census the population went up by 4m but we built 1.4m homes in a decade'', he says, adding that the trend was seen outside London where there were far fewer foreign buyers. ''In southern Manchester, property prices are pretty high relative to incomes, which is put down to a supply constraint and domestic demand ... prices are high in most successful places in Britain.''

    This article was published in the Financial Times on September 10, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage

    Monday 09 September 2013

    CBC Ottawa: Canada ranks 6th in global happiness survey

    Canada has some of the happiest people on the planet because of long life expectancy, high average income and robust social ties, according to a survey sponsored by the United Nations in which Canada ranked sixth. The report, coedited by John Helliwell with Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of development and health policy at Columbia University in New York, and London School of Economics professor emeritus Richard Layard, suggests more countries use citizen happiness as a measure of progress, citing the South Asian kingdom of Bhutan, which has developed a Gross National Happiness Index and aims above all to maximize it.

    The news item was broadcast by CBC Canada on September 9, 2013
    Link to item here

    Related publications
    'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
    Details


    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Monday 09 September 2013

    CBC Ottawa: Canada ranks 6th in global happiness survey

    Canada has some of the happiest people on the planet because of long life expectancy, high average income and robust social ties, according to a survey sponsored by the United Nations in which Canada ranked sixth. The report, coedited by John Helliwell with Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of development and health policy at Columbia University in New York, and London School of Economics professor emeritus Richard Layard, suggests more countries use citizen happiness as a measure of progress, citing the South Asian kingdom of Bhutan, which has developed a Gross National Happiness Index and aims above all to maximize it.

    The news item was broadcast by CBC Canada on September 9, 2013
    Link to item here

    Related publications
    'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
    Details


    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Monday 09 September 2013

    CBC Ottawa: Canada ranks 6th in global happiness survey

    Canada has some of the happiest people on the planet because of long life expectancy, high average income and robust social ties, according to a survey sponsored by the United Nations in which Canada ranked sixth. The report, coedited by John Helliwell with Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of development and health policy at Columbia University in New York, and London School of Economics professor emeritus Richard Layard, suggests more countries use citizen happiness as a measure of progress, citing the South Asian kingdom of Bhutan, which has developed a Gross National Happiness Index and aims above all to maximize it.

    The news item was broadcast by CBC Canada on September 9, 2013
    Link to item here

    Related publications
    'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
    Details


    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Tuesday 27 August 2013

    Valuewalk.com: Five out-of-office ways to invigorate your career this fall

    Even if you are not heading back to school, fall can be a great time to energize your career. Here are five ways you can boost your job performance and your overall career satisfaction - and they all involve new beginnings.
    Sources: Layard, Richard. Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Penguin Press, 2005

    This article was published online by Valuewalk.com on August 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Richard Layard, Penguin Press, 2nd edition, 2011
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy webpage

    Tuesday 27 August 2013

    Valuewalk.com: Five out-of-office ways to invigorate your career this fall

    Even if you are not heading back to school, fall can be a great time to energize your career. Here are five ways you can boost your job performance and your overall career satisfaction - and they all involve new beginnings.
    Sources: Layard, Richard. Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Penguin Press, 2005

    This article was published online by Valuewalk.com on August 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Richard Layard, Penguin Press, 2nd edition, 2011
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy webpage

    Tuesday 27 August 2013

    BBC Radio 4 PM Programme: News

    Henry Overman discussed HS2.

    The news item was aired on BBC Radio 4 News on August 27, 2013


    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 20 August 2013

    Guardian: Warwick policy lab to use Birmingham as 'testing ground' for ideas

    'What works' is not new from deliverology and the 'third way' through the Blair years to the what works centres. In Birmingham we have, for example, worked closely with Lord Heseltine following his ''no stone unturned'' report on economic growth. Lord Adonis is undertaking similar analysis for the Labour party. And, most recently, a new 'what works' centre on local economic growth has been announced which will be led by professor Henry Overman at the LSE.

    This article was published in the Guardian on August 20, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Thursday 15 August 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: Here's how to avoid thousands in tax - don't buy a house

    An LSE study of the most recent duty ''holiday'' found that a 1 per cent cut in the tax increased the number of transactions by 20 per cent. Most of those extra transactions were genuine, not just people moving a month or two earlier or later due to the temporary tax break.

    This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on August 15, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'The Effect of the UK Stamp Duty Land Tax on Household Mobility', Christian A. L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikainen, SERC Discussion Paper No.115, July 2012

    Related links
    Christian A. L. Hilber webpage
    Teemu Lyytikainen webpage
    SERC website

    Monday 12 August 2013

    Forbes India - Magazine: The correlation between money and happiness

    Money and happiness have been married and divorced umpteen times by economists. A recent study by University of Michigan professors Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers united moolah and mirth after Richard Easterlin, an economist and professor at the University of South Carolina, separated them in 1974. While the Easterlin Paradox stated that rise in income does not necessarily increase happiness, the new research refutes it by proving that the higher the income or the GDP (Gross Domestic Product), the more happy the person or the country is. No conditions apply. Between the two polar studies, several researchers tried to bring money and happiness together by establishing a threshold till which they hold hands before parting ways. For instance, in 2003, British economist Richard Layard set $15,000 as the point beyond which money does not fetch happiness. In his 2005 work, Layard reset the point at $20,000 a year.

    This article was published by Forbes India on August 12, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2nd edition, Penguin, April 2011
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy webpage

    Saturday 10 August 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: Put hated stamp duty to a worthy cause

    But does it really distort behaviour? A fascinating but little-noticed research paper published last year by the Spatial Economics Research Centre, part of the London School of Economics, provides an interesting take. The study showed that raising stamp duty from 1pc to 3pc reduced household mobility by around 40pc, so the tax is not just on house buyers but also on businesses.

    This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on August 10, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'The Effect of the UK Stamp Duty Land Tax on Household Mobility', Christian A. L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikainen, SERC Discussion Paper No.115, July 2012

    Related links
    Christian A. L. Hilber webpage
    Teemu Lyytikainen webpage
    SERC website

    Saturday 27 July 2013

    The Financial Times: Class worrier

    The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

    This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
    Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
    Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

    Related Links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Saturday 27 July 2013

    The Financial Times: Class worrier

    The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

    This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
    Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
    Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

    Related Links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Saturday 27 July 2013

    The Financial Times: Class worrier

    The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

    This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
    Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
    Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

    Related Links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Saturday 27 July 2013

    The Financial Times: Class worrier

    The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

    This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
    Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
    Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

    Related Links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Saturday 27 July 2013

    The Financial Times: Class worrier

    The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

    This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
    Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
    Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

    Related Links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Sunday 21 July 2013

    The Sunday Times: It's the middle class's empty quarter

    A recent study from the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the London School of Economics points out that, in many countries, the second-largest city is half the size of the largest and the third-largest is a third of the size.

    This article was published in The Sunday Times on July 21, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The economic future of British cities, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 26 June 2013

    The Independent: Let's go mad for Manchester - and beyond

    Now some work by the LSE suggests that the problem is not that London is too big, but rather that Britain's other cities are too small. Professor Henry Overman, director of its Spatial Economics Research Centre has concluded that we should allow successful provincial cities such as Manchester to grow even faster by loosening planning controls and improving education and other services there.

    This article appeared in the Independent on 26 July 2013 link to article

    Related publications
    The Economic Future of British Cities, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013 link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 05 June 2013

    Financial Times: Fall in joblessness fails to prove Spain's case for economic revival

    But my sense is they will only do the reforms that are impossible to avoid and where there is strong pressure from the EU, said Luis Garicano of the London School of Economics. Both private sector economists and academics have warned of the danger of complacency, arguing the government must not succumb to reform fatigue.

    This article appeared in Financial Times on 5 June 2013 link to article

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Tuesday 04 June 2013

    Financial Times: Brum belittled

    A warning about heavy-handed efforts to redirect activity can be taken from an extract from a history of Birmingham republished by Henry Overman of London School of Economics, on his blog.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 4 June 2013 link to article

    Related publications
    Booming Birmingham and the Need for Rebalancing Henry Overman, SERC blog, 28 May 2013


    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage
    SERC website website

    Tuesday 14 May 2013

    Financial Times: Chinese lessons for Yahoo's boss

    Although that particular form of indolence known as "working from home" is out of fashion at Yahoo, where Ms Mayer has told staff to work from the office, it is getting its first tentative trials in China. One local government in Shanghai is trying to promote the concept by working with Ctrip, China's largest, Nasdaq-listed travel agency. Ctrip told local Chinese news that it had lowered its usual requirements for age and appearance, and focused more on honesty and responsibility when deciding which employees should be allowed to work without coming to the office. The company's CEO, James Liang, wrote up Ctrip's nine-month experiment in home-working with Stanford University professor Nicholas Bloom, concluding that performance increased dramatically and attrition fell sharply - while the company saved about $2,000 per employee per year worked at home.

    This article was published in the Financial Times on May 14, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment', Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1194, March 2013

    Related links
    Nicholas Bloom webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Thursday 09 May 2013

    Evening Standard: Time to unblock the growth path

    It should not be as difficult as we seem to make it. A working group at the London School of Economics pointed out a few months ago that growth is neither about the size of the state or about deregulation. It is about whether the state is smart in the way it regulates and spends. We need well-designed policies to support growth and we need an institutional framework that delivers good policy.

    This article appeared in the Evening Standard on May 9, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    LSE Growth Commission Report - Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation, by Philippe Aghion, Timothy Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen, January 2013

    Related links
    Francesco Caselli webpage
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    LSE Growth Commission website

    Thursday 04 April 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: Family, not money, is the key to your child's performance at school

    Here's a piece of news that will send a certain kind of educationalist screaming from the room: family, not income, is key to a child's school performance. The London School of Economics, bastion of Left-of-centre thinking on all serious issues, conducted the study on disadvantaged children in England. They found that growing up in an impoverished area did not doom the children to do badly at school.

    This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 4 April 2013 link to article

    Related links
    See Felix Weinhardt webpage for publications link to article
    SERC website link

    Thursday 04 April 2013

    The Daily Mail: Family, not area, is key to a child's education: Children with parents who spent extra year in education get better grades

    A report's findings indicate it is the attitude towards education within their family unit that really matters. The research involved two groups of disadvantaged children in cities across England, all of whom were waiting to move into social housing in some of the most deprived neighbourhoods...Dr Felix Weinhardt, who conducted the research, said: "We have always tried to help the most disadvantaged children to get better life chances and one of the ways we thought we could do this is through housing policy." "But research now increasingly tells us that bad neighbourhood environments have no causal influence on these children's school performances at all." The postdoctoral fellow in the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance added: "These two groups of students really get very bad grades - very similar to students who live in high-density social housing neighbourhoods and never moved."

    This article appreared in the Daily Mail on 4 April 2013 link to article

    Related links
    See Felix Weinhardt webpage for publications link to webpage
    SERC Website

    Thursday 04 April 2013

    The Daily Mail: Family, not area, is key to a child's education: Children with parents who spent extra year in education get better grades

    A report's findings indicate it is the attitude towards education within their family unit that really matters. The research involved two groups of disadvantaged children in cities across England, all of whom were waiting to move into social housing in some of the most deprived neighbourhoods...Dr Felix Weinhardt, who conducted the research, said: "We have always tried to help the most disadvantaged children to get better life chances and one of the ways we thought we could do this is through housing policy." "But research now increasingly tells us that bad neighbourhood environments have no causal influence on these children's school performances at all." The postdoctoral fellow in the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance added: "These two groups of students really get very bad grades - very similar to students who live in high-density social housing neighbourhoods and never moved."

    This article appreared in the Daily Mail on 4 April 2013 link to article

    Related links
    See Felix Weinhardt webpage for publications link to webpage
    SERC Website

    Thursday 04 April 2013

    The Daily Mail: Family, not area, is key to a child's education: Children with parents who spent extra year in education get better grades

    A report's findings indicate it is the attitude towards education within their family unit that really matters. The research involved two groups of disadvantaged children in cities across England, all of whom were waiting to move into social housing in some of the most deprived neighbourhoods...Dr Felix Weinhardt, who conducted the research, said: "We have always tried to help the most disadvantaged children to get better life chances and one of the ways we thought we could do this is through housing policy." "But research now increasingly tells us that bad neighbourhood environments have no causal influence on these children's school performances at all." The postdoctoral fellow in the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance added: "These two groups of students really get very bad grades - very similar to students who live in high-density social housing neighbourhoods and never moved."

    This article appreared in the Daily Mail on 4 April 2013 link to article

    Related links
    See Felix Weinhardt webpage for publications link to webpage
    SERC Website

    Friday 15 March 2013

    The Economist: Planning reform: Pillow fight

    Converting office buildings is expensive, notes Adam Challis, of Jones Lang LaSalle. So much cheap office space will remain for businesses to rent, even if some disappears from city centres. As Henry Overman, of the London School of Economics, points out, rising rents have pushed Shoreditch's tech firms farther out into east London - not out of business altogether.

    This article appeared in the Economist on 15 March 2013 link to artilce

    Related publications
    The UK's housing crises Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece 17(3), Winter 2012
    Related links

    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website webpage
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage
    SERC blog: http://spatial-economics.blogspot.co.uk

    Friday 15 March 2013

    Centre for Cities: In conversation with...Prof Henry Overman

    This is the first in a series of podcasts the Centre for Cities will be recording with the London School of Economics examining key issues affecting UK economies. In advance of the 2013 Budget, Alexandra Jones, Chief Executive of Centre for Cities talks to Professor Henry Overman Director of the Spatial Economic Research Centre at LSE about the effectiveness of current policy in stimulating economic growth in cities. What can policy do to support places to unlock their potential?

    This article appeared on Centre for Cities on 15 March 2013 link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage

    Thursday 07 February 2013

    INSEAD: Dirty little habits: cleaning up the auto industry

    Dirty habits die hard and the only way to encourage auto makers to adopt clean technology is a short sharp shock in the fuel price. It's a radical approach, but research suggests it could work. David Hemous and his co researchers - Philippe Aghion of Harvard University and Antoine Dechezlepretre, Ralf Martin and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics - analysed data on auto industry technology patents over several decades. They distinguished between "dirty" technologies (petrol and diesel engines) and "clean" technology (electric and hybrid) and wanted to identify what could influence auto makers to adopt innovative, clean technology. Since 1978 globally, "dirty" patents outnumbered "clean technology" patents by a ratio of 3:1.

    This article was published online by INSEAD on February 7, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Carbon Taxes, Path Dependency and Directed Technical Change: Evidence from the Auto Industry', Philippe Aghion, Antoine Dechezlepretre, David Hemous, Ralf Martin and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1178, November 2012

    Related links
    Ralf Martin webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Tuesday 08 January 2013

    City AM: Daft planning rules are pushing up the price of food in shops

    Once again, misguided rules are responsible for Britain's woes and for the excessively high prices that are hurting all of us - and the poor especially badly. As explained in an excellent paper by Paul Cheshire, Christian Hilber and Ioannis Kaplanis, published by the London School of Economics' spatial economics centre, planning policies, including the notorious ''town centre first'' ideology, have had a devastating impact on retailers' productivity - and thus pushed up the cost of food and goods sold by supermarkets.

    This article was published by City AM on January 8, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Land use planning: the impact on retail productivity, Paul Cheshire, Christian Hilber, Ioannis Kaplanis. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 1, Summer 2011
    'Evaluating the Effects of Planning Policies on the Retail Sector: Or do Town Centre First Policies Deliver the Goods?', Paul Cheshire, Christian A. L. Hilber and Ioannis Kaplanis, Spatial Economics Research Centre Discussion Paper No.66, January 2011

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Christian Hilber webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 31 October 2012

    The Financial Times: Heseltine's report is a return to an unsuccessful past

    In a review of the work "No Stone Unturned", Michael Hesetline's report on economic growth, Henry Overman remarks that it is an important and puzzling document. The UK economy, out of recession but still vulnerable, could do with some new ideas. Companies are demanding a clear plan from the coalition. However, from its Boy's Own introduction title ('One man's vision') to its 89 recommendations, Mr Heseltine's report is a plan that is more nostalgic than strategic.

    The article was published in the Financial Times on October 31, 2012
    Link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Thursday 27 September 2012

    SERC / Grantham Research Project Launched: An investigation of the Carbon Footprint of the Retail Sector

    New SERC/Grantham project launched: an investigation of the Carbon Footprint of the Retail Sector

    LSE's Spatial Economics Research Centre and Grantham Research Institute have begun a new collaborative project exploring the environmental effects of town centre first planning, and its impact on retail sector carbon footprints.

    Land use regulation policies shape the location and the size of retail sites in the UK. The justification for Town Centre First Policies (TCFP) when they were imposed in England in 1996 rested strongly on their supposed ability to facilitate ‘linked trips’ and a desire to retain access to shopping for poorer households without cars. The main supposed benefit, therefore was that TCFP was worthwhile because of environmental and distributional gains, i.e. town centre sites were the most “sustainable”. Based on the premise that town centres are the most accessible location for alternative (non-car) means of transport and reduce the need to travel, imposing TCFP was expected to reduce the carbon footprint of the retail sector and help make the distribution of real incomes fairer.

    In on-going work, Professor Paul Cheshire SERC and LSE Geography and Dr Christian Hilber (SERC and LSE Geography) are researching the implications of TCFP on the cost side, specifically, on the productivity of the retail sector The findings of this research suggest that both TCFP and more restrictive local application of planning policies impose substantial costs in terms of foregone output on the retail sector. This new SERC/Grantham project with Dr Rosa Sanchis-Guarner (SERC and Grantham) follows up by focusing on the claimed benefits of TCFP and rigorously evaluating them. The project aims to test if TCFP does in fact reduce the overall carbon footprint of retail. While TCFPs may facilitate ‘linked trips’ and make shopping trips without cars easier (the claimed benefits), there are a number of reasons to suspect that the overall carbon footprint effect of TCFP may be negative – the claimed benefits may be, in other words, another cost.

    First, even if TCFP has encouraged some substitution towards public transport, most consumers still use private cars to go shopping (according to the National Travel Survey, in 2010 around 65% of shopping trips in GB were done by car/van, 22% by foot and only 10% of shopping trips were done by local bus or rail). Second, given that population has continued to decentralise, shopping patterns could have been adversely affected if retail is forced to locate in town centres while consumers increasingly live out of town. Average shopping trips might have been made longer and almost certainly diverted to more congested conditions. More frequent and longer trips by car to congested town centres can have potential adverse effects on carbon emissions associated with shopping trips. Carbon emissions and other toxic gases can also have harmful effects on population health outcomes. Third, on the logistics side, while there are no potential offsetting gains from the increased use of public transport, access for deliveries will almost certainly have been made more congested, lorry sizes reduced and distances from distribution depots on the outskirts of towns accessible to the motorway network, increased. Moreover, more expensive space and smaller shop sizes reduces storage space within shops, increasing the frequency of deliveries. Finally, previous research has shown that one impact of TCFP was to reduce the rate of retail development and this is reflected in an aging retail estate. Older buildings are less energy efficient.

    Overall, therefore, the likely effects of TCFP on sustainability are unclear. The research of this project, using various datasets on shopping patterns, gas emissions and store energy use, aims to evaluate the effect of land use planning policies on the carbon footprint, emissions and energy use in the retail sector. Additionally, it also aims to analyse the effect of carbon emissions stemming from the retail sector on air pollution and population health outcomes. Finally, the carbon footprint effects of the emergence of internet shopping and how this affects traditional shopping trips (and their carbon footprint) would also be explored.

    The methodology aims to estimate causal effects, including the precise role of different land use policies on the carbon footprint of the retail sector. Subject to data availability we also aim to explore the related distributional effects of TCFP as well as potential substitution effects: consumers may choose to shop online to avoid congested and inconvenient shopping trips by public transport or foot to town centre retailers.

    For more details contact Dr Rosa Sanchis-Guarner.

    Thursday 13 September 2012

    Washington Post: France said to press Spain to seek aid over German concerns

    "The situation in Spain is not improving, there is really absolutely no benefit in waiting", Nobel laureate Christopher Pissarides, an economics professor at the London School of Economics, said in an interview with Bloomberg Television yesterday. "There isn't anything in the pipeline that will ease the situation".

    The article was published in the Washington Post on September 13, 2012
    Link to article

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage
    Christopher Pissarides CEP publications webpage

    Thursday 13 September 2012

    The Business: A tangible Olympic economic boost?

    Several of our essayists are likewise sceptical about the existence of clear economic and business benefits to Olympic host cities and countries. Max Nathan, research fellow with the Spatial Economics Research Centre, London School of Economics, writes that hoped-for impacts from job creation, transport improvement and inducements to healthier living usually turn out to be small. He also warns that it will take years for any lasting benefits to become clear.

    This article was published in The Business on September 13, 2012
    Link to article

    Related links
    Max Nathan webpage
    SERC website

    Friday 07 September 2012

    The Economist: Planning and greenery - Belt too tight

    Max Nathan, of the London School of Economics, notes that councils have few incentives to encourage development. If planning permission is granted, profits flow to developers and to central government, which collects most taxes. The costs - of extra infrastructure and so on - are mostly borne by the council. Existing residents, whose houses may lose value, are not compensated.

    This article appeared in the Economist on 7 September 2012 link to article

    Related Links
    Max Nathan webpage
    SERC website webpage

    Thursday 30 August 2012

    SERC News: Henry Overman appointed to help transform London's West End

    Professor Henry Overman Director of SERC has been appointed as one of the commissioners of the newly-formed West End Commission (WEC), set up to establish a blueprint for the future success of London's busiest area.

    Created in January 2012 by Westminster City Council's cabinet, the WEC aims to guide the future success of the West End and consider the challenges it faces. It will look into issues including transport, infrastructure, city management, safety and the promotion of business and visitor needs. It will also look at lessons from other cities both in the UK and abroad. The Commission will be holding regular evidence sessions, starting in October.

    Professor Overman joins a team of 12 experts from business, entertainment, transport and academia. The commission is headed by Manchester City Council chief executive Sir Howard Bernstein, and includes Professor Yvonne Rydin (UCL), Jim Steer (Steer Davis Gleave), David Partridge (Argent) and Greg Clark (OECD).

    More information is available at www.westendcommission.com. The public evidence sessions will also be webcast on the site.

    Related Links

    Professor Henry Overman's webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website



    Friday 27 July 2012

    The Independent: Index of wellbeing: our duty to be perpetually happy

    The government has recently published the Index of Wellbeing, or rather the 'happiness index'. It was an attempt to measure the general happiness of the population and tailoring government policies to promote wellbeing and happiness. According to Professor Richard Layard, director of the Wellbeing programme at the LSE, this new index is a great step towards creating 'policy-making with wellbeing as a priority'. In other words, we all have a 'duty to be happy', and the government will enact policies to ensure this duty is realized.

    The article was published in The Independent on Friday 27 July, 2012
    Link to article

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Saturday 14 July 2012

    The Economist: Scourge of slums

    Good housing is obviously better than bad housing, but bad housing is better than none, and when the state gets into the business of licensing goods supply tends to fall. As Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, puts it, "schemes that restrict the ways in which we can use housing tend not to be beneficial to the poor. "

    The article was published in The Economist on July 14, 2012
    Link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Sunday 08 July 2012

    The Sunday Times: Don't get mad, get help

    A report by the mental-health policy group at the London School of Economics (LSE) estimates that these disorders now account for nearly half of all ill health suffered by people in Britain. But does the deluge of celebrity sufferers mean that while awareness is raised, there is a risk that mentalhealth problems become so commonplace, we are being conditioned into thinking they are the norm?

    This article appeared in the Sunday Times on the 8 July 2012 link to article

    Related publications
    How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS A report by The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group. Published 18 June 2012
    Download the report here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Mental Health Policy Group webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Sunday 08 July 2012

    The Sunday Times: Don't get mad, get help

    A report by the mental-health policy group at the London School of Economics (LSE) estimates that these disorders now account for nearly half of all ill health suffered by people in Britain. But does the deluge of celebrity sufferers mean that while awareness is raised, there is a risk that mentalhealth problems become so commonplace, we are being conditioned into thinking they are the norm?

    This article appeared in the Sunday Times on the 8 July 2012 link to article

    Related publications
    How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS A report by The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group. Published 18 June 2012
    Download the report here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Mental Health Policy Group webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Sunday 08 July 2012

    The Sunday Times: Don't get mad, get help

    A report by the mental-health policy group at the London School of Economics (LSE) estimates that these disorders now account for nearly half of all ill health suffered by people in Britain. But does the deluge of celebrity sufferers mean that while awareness is raised, there is a risk that mentalhealth problems become so commonplace, we are being conditioned into thinking they are the norm?

    This article appeared in the Sunday Times on the 8 July 2012 link to article

    Related publications
    How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS A report by The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group. Published 18 June 2012
    Download the report here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Mental Health Policy Group webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Sunday 08 July 2012

    The Sunday Times: Don't get mad, get help

    A report by the mental-health policy group at the London School of Economics (LSE) estimates that these disorders now account for nearly half of all ill health suffered by people in Britain. But does the deluge of celebrity sufferers mean that while awareness is raised, there is a risk that mentalhealth problems become so commonplace, we are being conditioned into thinking they are the norm?

    This article appeared in the Sunday Times on the 8 July 2012 link to article

    Related publications
    How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS A report by The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group. Published 18 June 2012
    Download the report here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Mental Health Policy Group webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Sunday 08 July 2012

    The Sunday Times: Don't get mad, get help

    A report by the mental-health policy group at the London School of Economics (LSE) estimates that these disorders now account for nearly half of all ill health suffered by people in Britain. But does the deluge of celebrity sufferers mean that while awareness is raised, there is a risk that mentalhealth problems become so commonplace, we are being conditioned into thinking they are the norm?

    This article appeared in the Sunday Times on the 8 July 2012 link to article

    Related publications
    How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS A report by The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group. Published 18 June 2012
    Download the report here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Mental Health Policy Group webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Friday 29 June 2012

    The Economist: Immigrants: Hello, world

    Max Nathan, a researcher at the LSE who has surveyed 7,400 companies in London, has found that firms set up or managed by migrants are more innovative. "There is a small but significant 'diversity bonus' for London", he says.

    This article was published in The Economist on June 29, 2012
    Link to article

    Related links
    Max Nathan webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 26 June 2012

    LSE Public Debate: Ending the Housing Crisis: Should we ever build on the Green Belt?

    Organised by British Governement@ LSE and LSE London, this event forms part of the LSE Hot Topics series. House prices in Britain remain exceptionally high. We urgently need more housing, but where should we build it? Can we meet our needs by redeveloping existing built up areas? Or does the problem call for more radical solutions.

    On Wednesday 27 June 2012, Professor Henry Overman, Alex Morton, Professor Anne Power and Tony Burton will debate the issue.

    For more information including time, venue and registration details, please visit the SERC website http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/SERC/events/special.asp#greenbelt

    Visit Henry Overman's webpage
    Visit British Government@LSE website
    Visit LSE London website

     



    Wednesday 20 June 2012

    The Daily Telegraph: Regional pay plans scuppered by politics

    Such distortions are economically destructive. They make it harder for businesses in the regions to recruit workers at competitive wage rates and as a consequence they stifle enterprise. A study by academics at the London School of Economics has found that over time this "crowds out private sector employment overall".

    The article was published in The Daily Telegraph on June 20, 2012
    Link to article

    Related publications
    The Effect of Public Sector Employment on Local Labour Markets, Giulia Faggio and Henry Overman, SERC Discussioin Paper No.111, June 2012

    Related links
    Giulia Faggio webpage
    Henry Overman webpage
    Henry Overmanblog
    SERC website

    Friday 15 June 2012

    The Spectator: How not to create jobs

    A fascinating study has been released today by the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the LSE showing the damage done by public sector employment to the real economy. Drawing on a huge amount of local-level data over an eight-year period, it’s a serious piece of research that is worth looking into and deserves to impact our economic debate.

    The article was published in The Spectator on June 15, 2012
    Link to article

    Related publications
    The Effect of Public Sector Employment on Local Labour Markets, Giulia Faggio and Henry Overman, SERC Discussion Paper No.111, June 2012

    Related links
    Giulia Faggio webpage
    Henry Overman webpage
    Henry Overman blog
    SERC website
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Friday 15 June 2012

    The Daily Telegraph: Big government is bad for manufacturing in Britain

    There is a really important report out today from academics at the LSE, looking at whether high levels of public sector unemployment in some parts of the country might be crowding out private sector jobs.

    The article was published in The Daily Telegraph on June 15, 2012
    Link to article

    Related publications
    The Effect of Public Sector Employment on Local Labour Markets, Giulia Faggio and Henry Overman, SERC Discussion Paper No.111, June 2012

    Related links
    Giulia Faggio webpage
    Henry Overman webpage
    Henry Overman blog
    SERC website
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Tuesday 29 May 2012

    Department of Geography and Environment Public Lecture: Professor Diane Coyle on ''Enough: policies for a sustainable economy''

    Public Lecture - Enough: Policies for a sustainable economy

    On Thursday 14 June, the LSE Department of Geography and the Environment will host a public lecture by Professor Diane Coyle on "Enough: policies for a sustainable economy".

    The world's leading economies are facing many crises. What these crises have in common is a reckless disregard for the future. This lecture examines the policy changes necessary to run the economy for tomorrow as well as today.

    Diane Coyle runs Enlightenment Economics. She is vice chair of the BBC Trust, and a visiting professor at the University of Manchester.

    The lecture runs from 6.30 - 8.00pm and will take place in the New Theatre, LSE East Building, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE. Professor Henry Overman will chair this event. Full details can be found on the LSE Events website at the following link: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/publicEvents/events/2012/06/20120614t1830vNT.aspx.

    Go to SERC website
    Henry Overman's webpage



    Monday 23 April 2012

    The Washington Post: England Student Debt Unprecedented as Government Shifts Funding

    U.S. education debt can't be discharged through bankruptcy and almost 2 million Americans with student debt are over 60, according to the New York Federal Reserve. About $85 billion in student debt was delinquent in the third quarter of 2011. In March, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said U.S. student-loan debt had reached $1 trillion, based on preliminary findings. "The American system is brutal" said Tim Leunig who teaches economic history at the London School of Economics.

    This article appeared in the The Washington Post on 23 April 2012 link to article

    Related links
    Tim Leunig webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Monday 23 April 2012

    The Washington Post: England Student Debt Unprecedented as Government Shifts Funding

    U.S. education debt can't be discharged through bankruptcy and almost 2 million Americans with student debt are over 60, according to the New York Federal Reserve. About $85 billion in student debt was delinquent in the third quarter of 2011. In March, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said U.S. student-loan debt had reached $1 trillion, based on preliminary findings. "The American system is brutal" said Tim Leunig who teaches economic history at the London School of Economics.

    This article appeared in the The Washington Post on 23 April 2012 link to article

    Related links
    Tim Leunig webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Sunday 22 April 2012

    SERC Annual Conference: 17-18 May 2012

    4th Annual SERC Conference

    The fourth SERC Annual Conference will take place at the London School of Economics on Thursday 17 and Friday 18 May 2011. The conference is held over two days, with the first half of the programme devoted to presentations based on current / recent PhD research, and the second to papers by SERC staff and affiliates, relating to the Centre's own research.

    For more information, including the conference programme, please visit the SERC Events webpage: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/SERC/events/special.asp



    Friday 30 March 2012

    The Guardian: Local economies: an opportunity for councils or risking stagnation?

    Giving councils more financial freedom could be a double-edged sword if they don't have the proper resources
    There is a feeling that any initiative intended to incentivise growth is bound to create winners and losers. "If you want to incentivise councils to do things that impact growth, there has to be some inequality", says Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics.

    This article was published in the Guardian on March 30, 2012
    Link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Wednesday 07 March 2012

    SERC Visitor: Jens Suedekum

    Jens Suedekum is Professor of Economics at the Mercator School of Management at University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany) and research fellow of CESifo, IZA and the IAB. He has studied economics at the University of Goettingen and at University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) and has been Assistant Professor at the University of Konstanz. His main fields of specialization are urban economics and international trade. Recent research has focused on city size distributions, structural estimation of spatial models, and the organization of multinational enterprises. Jens is an associate editor of the Journal of Regional Science and is visiting SERC from March until June 2012.

    Thursday 16 February 2012

    SERC Job Vacancy: Research Economist - Spatial Economics Research Centre

    The Spatial Economics Research Centre has an opening for a Research Economist.

    For full details about the post and information on how to apply, please visit the SERC website Jobs page.

    The closing date for applications is Friday 16th March 2012.



    Friday 10 February 2012

    SERC Fourth Annual Conference 17-18 May 2012: Call for Papers from Postgraduate Research

    The Centre's annual conference in May is held over two days, with the first half of the programme devoted to presentations based on current / recent PhD research, and the second to papers by SERC staff and affiliates, relating to the Centre's own research.

    Submissions are invited now for papers to be presented in the PhD / young researcher sessions
    Download more information here

    Friday 03 February 2012

    RSM Tenon: Report slams grants for larger firms

    ...have wasted grants issued to them to breathe new life into deprived areas. A team based at the London School of Economics made the call about firms which employ more than 150 people, after conducting a study...

    This article appeared in RSM Tenon on 3 February 2012 link to article

    Related publications
    The Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy by Chiara Criscuolo, Ralf Martin, Henry Overman and John Van Reenen, SERC Discussion Paper No. 98
    The Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy by Chiara Criscuolo, Ralf Martin, Henry Overman and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1113

    Thursday 02 February 2012

    The Times Online: Davos Day 3: Europe not out of the woods yet

    Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google, will discuss the changes wrought by technology upon the global economy with Professor Christopher Pissarides of the LSE.

    This article appeared on the Times Online on 2 February 2012 (no link avaliable)

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage


    Wednesday 01 February 2012

    The Scotsman: Large firm grants ‘waste of money'

    After looking at every manufacturing plant in England, Wales and Scotland before and after they received government support, academics based at the London School of Economics (LSE) argue that grants to larger firms are a waste of taxpayers' money.


    This article appeared in The Scotsman on February 1, 2012
    Link to article

    Also in
    West Lothian Herald and Post
    Large firm grants 'waste of money'

    Related publications
    The Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy, Chiara Criscuolo, Ralf Martin, Henry Overman and John Van Reenen
    SERC Discussion Paper No. 98, January 2012
    The Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy, Chiara Criscuolo, Ralf Martin, Henry Overman and John Van Reenen
    Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1113, January 2012

    Related links
    Chiara Criscuolo webpage
    Ralf Martin webpage
    Henry Overman webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    SERC website
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Wednesday 01 February 2012

    The Telegraph: Grants for small businesses create jobs in deprived areas

    Giving small firms in deprived areas £5,000 grants created "significant" numbers of new jobs and investment, an extensive study covering two decades has found. Large companies, in contrast, pocketed the grants and created few new jobs, said the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.


    This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on February 1, 2012 link to article

    Related publications
    The Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy, Chiara Criscuolo, Ralf Martin, Henry Overman and John Van Reenen
    SERC Discussion Paper No. 98, January 2012
    The Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy, Chiara Criscuolo, Ralf Martin, Henry Overman and John Van Reenen
    Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1113, January 2012

    Related links
    Chiara Criscuolo webpage
    Ralf Martin webpage
    Henry Overman webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    SERC website
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Friday 20 January 2012

    SERC Visitor: Hans Koster

    Hans Koster is a PhD. Candidate at the VU University Amsterdam and a guest researcher at the Spatial Economics Research Centre. He obtained his Bachelor's degree in Economics at the Erasmus University Rotterdam and his Master's degree (Cum Laude) in Spatial Economics at the VU University Amsterdam. His research mainly focuses on the analysis of commercial and residential real estate markets. He is visiting SERC from January until April 2012.



    Friday 09 December 2011

    Urban Land Institute Europe: Cities: it's size, skills, and regulation (column by Paul Cheshire)

    SERC’s Paul Cheshire has a new op-ed piece for Urban Land Institute Europe. ‘Cities: it’s size, skills, and regulation’ looks at the fundamental factors behind cities’ economic and social resilience. Read the piece here

    This article appeared on Urban Land Institute Europe on 9 December 2011

    Related Links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC webpage

    Friday 09 December 2011

    New Statesman: Fragmentation or integration

    Comment: Econometric studies at the LSE and the University of Bristol appear to demonstrate that hospital based competition has improved clinical quality more rapidly in hospitals that are subject to greater competition. The price of competition
    By Carol Propper
    Piece in The New Statesman’s supplement titled ‘Competition in a New Society: National Health’ The government’s resolve will have been buoyed by recent research by the LSE and the University of Bristol. These econometric studies appear to demonstrate that the hospitalbased competition introduced by the previous government (the patient choice initiative) improved clinical quality more rapidly in hospitals subject to greater competition. While the validity of this evidence has been contested by other academics, it has been cited by David Cameron to support a more hawkish competition policy

    This article appreared in the New Statesmen on 9 December 2011 link to article

    Related publications
    ‘Management in Healthcare: Why Good Practice Really Matters’ Report from McKinsey & Company and the Centre for Economic Performance, October 2010
    ‘Management practices in the NHS’ CentrePiece 14 (3), Winter 2010 http://cep.lse.ac.uk/CentrePiece/browse.asp?vol=14&issue=3) pages 16-19, by Nick Bloom, Carol Propper, Stephan Seiler and John Van Reenen

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Tuesday 22 November 2011

    Research Economist Vacancy: LSE Spatial Economics Research Centre and Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment

    Salary: £31998- £38,737 pa. incl.
    2 year post

    The LSE Spatial Economics Research Centre and the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment seek a research economist to work on joint projects on the carbon footprint of the retail sector and the built environment, the role of land use planning and its interaction with policy and land markets. You will take significant responsibility for research design, day to day research management, identification and collection of relevant data and writing up the results of projects.

    You will have a PhD, or a nearly completed PhD, in Economics or other quantitative social science discipline, together with excellent analytical and econometric skills, experience of working with large datasets and knowledge experience/ interest in the area of research. Opportunity will be made for you to coauthor papers and develop your own related research agenda.

    Further details on the work of these centres can be found at:
    http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/ and http://www2.lse.ac.uk/GranthamInstitute/Home.aspx

    To apply for this post please go to www.lse.ac.uk/JobsatLSE and select "Visit the ONLINE RECRUITMENT SYSTEM web page" If you have any queries about applying on the online system, please call 020 7955 6656 or email hr.jobs@lse.ac.uk quoting reference 1219700.
    Closing Date: Sunday 18 December 2011

    Monday 31 October 2011

    Channel 4 News: Government job figures 'over-optimistic'

    Nick Clegg's announcement that 37,000 new jobs will be created by using £1bn from the regional growth fund may be over-optimistic, a leading economist tells Channel 4 News. Professor Henry Overman, from the London School of Economics, said the government's figures suggested each new job would cost just £4,700, which seemed low.

    This article appeared on Channel 4 News online on October 31, 2011
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Thursday 20 October 2011

    Evidence on NHS competition: Response to Allyson Pollock et al.

    Recent evidence from the LSE has been widely cited as showing positive effects from choice and competition between hospitals in the NHS. A recent Lancet piece was highly critical of the LSE research (and a number of other papers that used a similar approach).

    Read the authors response to these criticisms here

    Thursday 20 October 2011

    Evidence on NHS competition: Response to Allyson Pollock et al.

    Recent evidence from the LSE has been widely cited as showing positive effects from choice and competition between hospitals in the NHS. A recent Lancet piece was highly critical of the LSE research (and a number of other papers that used a similar approach).

    Read the authors response to these criticisms here

    Wednesday 19 October 2011

    Regional Studies Prize for Henry Overman: For joint paper: 'Economic linkages across space'

    SERC Director Henry Overman has been awarded the Best Paper in Regional Studies prize for 2011, for his paper 'Economic linkages across space', written with SERC colleagues Patricia Rice and Anthony J. Venables.

    Download paper here

    More information on the 2011 awards can be found on the Regional Studies Association website

    Monday 10 October 2011

    New research from SERC: Income inequality, decentralisation and regional development in Western Europe

    Vassilis Tselios, Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, Andy Pike, John Tomaney and Gianpiero Torrisi
    WP 2011/16

    This paper deals with the relationship between decentralisation, regional economic development, and income inequality within regions. Using multiplicative interaction models and regionally aggregated microeconomic data for more than 100,000 individuals in the European Union (EU), it addresses two main questions. First, whether fiscal and political decentralisation in Western Europe has an effect on within regional interpersonal inequality. Second, whether this potential relationship is mediated by the level of economic development of the region. The results of the analysis show that greater fiscal decentralisation is associated with lower interpersonal income inequality, but as regional income rises, further decentralisation is connected to a lower decrease in inequality. This finding is robust to the measurement and definition of income inequality, as well as to the weighting of the spatial units by their population size. Link to article

    Monday 10 October 2011

    New research from SERC: Spatial Frictions

    Kristian Behrens, Giordano Mion, Yasusada Murata and Jens Südekum
    CEPR DP8572

    The world is replete with spatial frictions. Shipping goods across cities entails trade frictions. Commuting within cities causes urban frictions. How important are these frictions in shaping the spatial economy? We develop and quantify a novel framework to address this question at three different levels: Do spatial frictions matter for the city-size distribution? Do they affect individual city sizes? Do they contribute to the productivity advantage of large cities and the nature of competition in cities? The short answers are: no, yes, and it depends. Link to article

    Monday 10 October 2011

    New research from SERC: Everybody needs good Neighbours? Evidence from students' outcomes in England

    Stephen Gibbons, Olmo Silva, Felix Weinhardt
    IZA DP No. 5980


    We estimate the effect of neighbours’ characteristics and prior achievements on teenage students’ educational and behavioural outcomes using census data on several cohorts of secondary school students in England. Our research design is based on changes in neighbourhood composition caused explicitly by residential migration amongst students in our dataset. The longitudinal nature and detail of the data allows us to control for student unobserved characteristics, neighbourhood fixed effects and time trends, school-by-cohort fixed effects, as well as students’ observable attributes and prior attainments. The institutional setting also allows us to distinguish between neighbours who attend the same or different schools, and thus examine interactions between school and neighbourhood peers. Overall, our results provide evidence that peers in the neighbourhood have no effect on test scores, but have a small effect on behavioural outcomes, such as attitudes towards schooling and anti-social behaviour. Link to paper

    Tuesday 20 September 2011

    Grantham Research Institute - SERC Seminar: How Will European Cities Adapt to Climate Change?

    Matthew E Khan
    Institute of the Environment, the Department of Economics, and the Department of Public Policy, UCLA

    Tuesday 20th September, 14.00-16.00 in S421, St Clements Building

    Abstract
    As world greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise, we have strong individual and collective incentives to adapt to the "known unknown" challenges that climate change will pose. Given free mobility of labor and capital within the European Union, urban economics offers some predictions concerning how the new risks and opportunities posed by climate change will affect the spatial distribution of economic activity within Europe. This talk will sketch a research agenda focused on the microeconomics of climate change adaptation with a special focus on the choices of optimizing households, firms and local governments.

    Biography
    Matthew E. Kahn is a Professor of Economics at UCLA. He holds a General Course degree from the LSE ('87) and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago. He is the author of Green Cities: Urban Growth and the Environment (2006) and Climatopolis: How Our Cities Will Thrive in the Hotter Future (2010).

    Thursday 01 September 2011

    SERC Visitor: Dr Tuukka Saarimaa

    Tuukka works as a senior researcher at the Government Institute for Economic Research (VATT) in Finland and is visiting the Spatial Economics Research Centre from September until December 2011. His main research interests are in housing and urban economics, local public finance and applied microeconometrics.

    Tuesday 05 July 2011

    SERC Visitor: Francisco Requena-Silvente

    Francisco Requena is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Valencia. He will be visiting SERC from July until August 2011. His research while at SERC will be on the impact of information spillovers on firms’ decision about where to export.

    Thursday 30 June 2011

    Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC)/LSE and John D Wood and Co.: House Price and Inflation Expectations Survey

    The second wave of the survey took place between June 8 and June 18, 2011. SERC wish to thank all those who participated to the house price expectations survey organised by Philippe Bracke (SERC) and real estate agent John D Wood & Co. The goal of the survey and resulting report was to measure house price expectations and improve our understanding of how these expectations are formed.

    To see a first summary of results, click the following link:

    http://personal.lse.ac.uk/bracke/LSE-JDW_June_2011.pdf

    A more complete report of the survey findings will be made available to respondents who requested it.

    Please contact Philippe Bracke (p.bracke@lse.ac.uk) for further information or comments.

    This article was posted 30th June 2011



    Wednesday 29 June 2011

    The Atlantic: 'The Pursuit of Happiness': How Do Communities Make Us Happy?

    Some scholars see the study of happiness as a branch of economics, or at least a critical examination of traditional macroeconomics. It is way beyond the scope of this blog post to discuss the academic aspects, but among the works that discuss but among the works that discuss it in detail are Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, by noted British economist Lord Richard Layard

    This article appeared in The Atlantic on 29 July 2011 link to article

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005 details

    Wednesday 29 June 2011

    The Atlantic: 'The Pursuit of Happiness': How Do Communities Make Us Happy?

    Some scholars see the study of happiness as a branch of economics, or at least a critical examination of traditional macroeconomics. It is way beyond the scope of this blog post to discuss the academic aspects, but among the works that discuss but among the works that discuss it in detail are Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, by noted British economist Lord Richard Layard

    This article appeared in The Atlantic on 29 July 2011 link to article

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005 details

    Wednesday 29 June 2011

    The Atlantic: 'The Pursuit of Happiness': How Do Communities Make Us Happy?

    Some scholars see the study of happiness as a branch of economics, or at least a critical examination of traditional macroeconomics. It is way beyond the scope of this blog post to discuss the academic aspects, but among the works that discuss but among the works that discuss it in detail are Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, by noted British economist Lord Richard Layard

    This article appeared in The Atlantic on 29 July 2011 link to article

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005 details

    Wednesday 29 June 2011

    The Atlantic: 'The Pursuit of Happiness': How Do Communities Make Us Happy?

    Some scholars see the study of happiness as a branch of economics, or at least a critical examination of traditional macroeconomics. It is way beyond the scope of this blog post to discuss the academic aspects, but among the works that discuss but among the works that discuss it in detail are Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, by noted British economist Lord Richard Layard

    This article appeared in The Atlantic on 29 July 2011 link to article

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005 details

    Friday 24 June 2011

    The Guardian: Don't rubbish my research. Competition really does improve the NHS

    Separate research by economists Bloom, Propper, Seiler and Van Reenen at Stanford, Imperial and the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance found competition led to improvements in hospital management which resulted in lower death rates, higher patient satisfaction and efficiency gains.

    This article appeared in the Guardian on 24 June 2011 link to article

    Related publications
    ‘In brief… Competition in the public sector: good for the goose, good for the gander?’, Zack Cooper, CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 1, Summer 2011 link
    ‘Does Hospital Competition Improve Efficiency? An Analysis of the Recent Market-Based Reforms to the English NHS’, Zack Cooper, Steve Gibbons, Simon Jones and Alistair McGuire, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.988, June 2010 link

    Related links
    Zack Cooper webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Further information on health economics and NHS policy link
    Summary of research papers on NHS reform link

    Friday 24 June 2011

    The Guardian: Don't rubbish my research. Competition really does improve the NHS

    Separate research by economists Bloom, Propper, Seiler and Van Reenen at Stanford, Imperial and the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance found competition led to improvements in hospital management which resulted in lower death rates, higher patient satisfaction and efficiency gains.

    This article appeared in the Guardian on 24 June 2011 link to article

    Related publications
    ‘In brief… Competition in the public sector: good for the goose, good for the gander?’, Zack Cooper, CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 1, Summer 2011 link
    ‘Does Hospital Competition Improve Efficiency? An Analysis of the Recent Market-Based Reforms to the English NHS’, Zack Cooper, Steve Gibbons, Simon Jones and Alistair McGuire, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.988, June 2010 link

    Related links
    Zack Cooper webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Further information on health economics and NHS policy link
    Summary of research papers on NHS reform link

    Friday 24 June 2011

    The Evening Standard: Moving the poor out of town doesn't solve poverty

    It has been an article of faith among socially-minded reformers since the days of Joseph Rowntree and Ebenezer Howard that "mixed communities" are a good thing and income segregation bad. Yet the evidence in favour of mixed-income neighbourhoods is weak. Poor children from rich neighbourhoods do not seem to do any better in life than those from poor neighbourhoods. LSE economists Paul Cheshire and Henry Overman argue that there might even be benefits for poor people living in poor neighbourhoods: shops are cheaper and public services tailored to them.

    This article appeared in the Evening Stnadard on 24 June 2011 link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Thursday 23 June 2011

    Newsroom Panama: What the papers say: Germany has to remember unpaid war debt to Greece

    Albrecht Ritschl a professor at the London School of Economics, has slammed Germans for their hostile attitude to the near bankrupt Mediterranean country.

    This article appeared in Newsroom Panama on 23 June 2011 link to article

    Related Links
    Albrecht Ritschl webpage
    Macro Prgramme webpage

    Thursday 23 June 2011

    Newsroom Panama: What the papers say: Germany has to remember unpaid war debt to Greece

    Albrecht Ritschl a professor at the London School of Economics, has slammed Germans for their hostile attitude to the near bankrupt Mediterranean country.

    This article appeared in Newsroom Panama on 23 June 2011 link to article

    Related Links
    Albrecht Ritschl webpage
    Macro Prgramme webpage

    Monday 09 May 2011

    Globe and Mail: London's real estate market bounces back

    Henry Overman the director of the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the London School of Economics, thinks the bank bailouts contributed to Londons bounce back. The nationalizations and other support measures saved the weak banks from almost certain destruction and helped the stronger ones muddle through the downturn.

    This article appeared in the Globe and Mail on 9 May 2011 link to article

    Also in
    CTV News (Canada)
    link to article

    Related publications
    How did London get away with it? link
    Full paper link
    CentrePiece 15 (3) Winter 2011 pages: 16-17 link
    Further reading: Steve Gibbons, Henry Overman and Panu Pelkonen (2010) 'Wage Disparities in Britain: People or Place?', SERC Discussion Paper No.60 link

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Saturday 30 April 2011

    This is Money: A vital force for growth

    A report last year by the OECD found it is harder to climb the social ladder here than in the US, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, Canada and a clutch of Scandinavian countries. A previous study by the London School of Economics suggested social mobility had declined in the UK, and that people born in 1970 had less chance of escaping the circumstances into which they were born than in 1958.

    This article appeared in This is Money on 30 April 2011 link to article

    Related Publications
    Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
    Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

    Related links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Steve Machin webpage
    Alissa Goodman webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Friday 01 April 2011

    Business Spectator: How did London get away with it?

    First, relative to both other regions of the UK and to expectations, London appears to have got away with it. The over-representation of the professional occupations partly explains this. The bailout may explain why these occupations did even better in London.
    Article by Henry Overman

    This article appeared in Business Spectator on 1 April 2011 link to article

    Related publications
    How did London get away with it?’ Henry Overman, CentrePiece Vol 15, Issue 3, Winter 2010/2011
    ‘Wage Disparities in Britain: People or Place?’ Steve Gibbons, Henry Overman and Panu Pelkonen, SERC Discussion Paper No.60, October 2010


    Related links
    ‘How did London get away with it? The recession and the north-south divide’
    Lecture Details link
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website webpage


    Tuesday 29 March 2011

    Vox: How did London get away with it?

    When the global crisis hit, many predicted that London would suffer more than other parts of the UK, given the city’s reliance on the financial services industry. This column explores how the UK capital’s economy suffered far less than the rest of the country. (Article by Henry Overman)

    This article appeared in Vox.com on 29 March 2011 link to article

    Related publications
    How did London get away with it?’ Henry Overman, CentrePiece Vol 15, Issue 3, Winter 2010/2011
    ‘Wage Disparities in Britain: People or Place?’ Steve Gibbons, Henry Overman and Panu Pelkonen, SERC Discussion Paper No.60, October 2010

    Related links
    ‘How did London get away with it? The recession and the north-south divide’
    Lecture Details link
    Henry Overman link
    SERC website link

    Tuesday 22 March 2011

    Guardian: How London is bouncing back from the recession

    A couple of months ago, Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the LSE, gave a lecture titled How Did London Get Away With It? His answer came down to the kind of jobs that Londoners tend to have. The capital has the lion's share of financial services, and those industries came out of the meltdown in far healthier shape than expected. It also has lots of managerial and professional workers, and they've also done better than expected.

    This article appeared in the Guardian on March 22, 2011
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    How Did London Get Away With It?, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 3, Winter 2010/2011
    'Wage Disparities in Britain: People or Place?', Stephen Gibbons, Henry Overman and Panu Pelkonen, SERC Discussion Paper No.60, October 2010
    Slides for SERC and LSE London lecture How Did London Get Away With It? The Recession and the North-South Divide' given on 20 January 2011

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage


    Sunday 20 March 2011

    El Pais: Moody's contra el Banco de España

    Pero en este pulso los economistas consultados disparan contra Moody's: para Luis Garicano de la London School of Economics, "la arrogante pereza que supone no esperar a que el saque sus números (no sea que haya que estudiarse los datos antes de opinar) es incomprensible en...

    This article appeared in El Pais on 20 March 2011 link to article

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Monday 14 March 2011

    Financial Times: 'Land auctions' plan to stimulate growth

    It is mentioned that Ed Davey and the LSE's Tim Leunig had in 2007 made a proposal in relation to gaps in land pricing.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on the 14 March 2011 link to article

    Related links
    Tim Leunig webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Thursday 03 March 2011

    About My Area.com: Stop HS2 Delighted By Economic Case Inquiry For HS2

    When he was giving evidence to the Transport Select committee, Prof Henry Overman said that many projects are promoted on the grounds that they will be transformational, but in actuality, many of these claims do not materialise.

    This article appeared on About My Area.com on 3 March 2011 link to article

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC webpage
    Globalisation webpage

    Monday 14 February 2011

    Providence Journal: Matthew Lynn: 'Austerity' means the rich get richer

    London, by far the richest region of the UK, came through the recession in better shape than the rest of the country, says Henry Overman, the director of the Spatial Economics Research Center at the London School of Economics. "It's simply not a middle-class recession and a greater representation of the middle class is in the southeast of England," he said last month.

    This article appeared in Providence Journal on 14 February 2011 link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC webpage webpage
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage

    Saturday 12 February 2011

    Sydney Morning Herald: The rich get richer and the disunited kingdom is all the poorer for it

    London, by far the richest region of the UK, came through the recession in better shape than the rest of the country, says Henry Overman, the director of the Spatial Economics Research Center at the London School of Economics. "It's simply not a middle-class recession and a greater representation of the middle class is in the southeast of England," he said last month.

    This article appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC webpage
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage

    Monday 07 February 2011

    Business Week: Rich get richer when government tout austerity: Matthew Lynn

    London, by far the wealthiest region of the U.K., came through the recession in better shape than the rest of the country, according to Henry Overman, the director of the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the London School of Economics.

    This article appeared in Business Week on 7 February 2011 link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC webpages
    Henry Overman publications webpage


    Monday 06 December 2010

    NewsKF: How much my house worth?

    [first published in The Wall Street Journal on 25 November 2010]
    2007 real estate boom has raised housing prices by more than 100%, according to a study by Luis Garicano professor at the London School of Economics. According to the same report, the Spanish market accounted for two thirds of the units built in Europe between 1999 and 2007.

    This article appeared in News FK on 6 December 2010 link to article

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Friday 03 December 2010

    Pensions World: Conference report SPC riveting stuff

    Dr Tim Leunig of the London School of Economics and Policy Exchange mesmerised delegates in the next session entitled “What is required to turn the tide?” First he debunked the myth that the pensions system was better in the olden days.

    This article appeared in Pensions World on December 3, 2010
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Tim Leunig webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Wednesday 17 November 2010

    Politics.co.uk: ESRC: Britain in 2011, the state of the Nation

    This year's magazine features articles on: 'Getting Finance to Support Investment' - John Van Reenen argues that the risk of another financial crisis has increased.

    This article appeared in Politics.co.uk on November 17, 2010
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    'Britain in 2011, The State of the Nation'. Published by the ESRC.
    Details

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    John Van Reenen CEP publications webpage

    Wednesday 27 October 2010

    British Medical Journal: UK hospitals are better managed than counterparts in Canada, France, Germany and Italy but not the US, report says

    Hospitals in the United Kingdom are “better managed” than their counterparts in several European countries and Canada, new research concludes. It also says that private sector organisations perform best overall across the countries. John Van Reenan, director of the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, said, “For the UK, having more clinically trained managers should be a priority.” Rebecca Homkes, project director for the Centre for Economic Performance, said that the study found better management scores in the private sector generally, not just in the UK.

    This article appeared in the British Medical Journal on October 27, 2010
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Management in Healthcare: Why Good Practice Really Matters. Report from McKinsey & Company and the Centre for Economic Performance, October 2010
    Management practices in the NHS, CentrePiece 14 (3), Winter 2010 pages 16-19, by Nick Bloom, Carol Propper, Stephan Seiler and John Van Reenen

    Related Links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    Rebecca Homkes webpage
    Raffaella Sadun webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Management and Organisational Structures research webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Tuesday 12 October 2010

    The Guardian: Budget cuts force NHS hospitals to stop non-emergency surgery

    Unions claim that the mismanagement of NHS trusts is behind the temporary closure of hospital services. Experts said they were "shocked" by the scale of the trust's proposals, and pointed out that suggested they presented a political challenge to the health secretary, Andrew Lansley, as he pushed health service reforms. "I have never heard anything like it," said Zack Cooper, a health economist at the London School of Economics. "Patients in Basildon cannot access IVF, but in London they can. I think this is going to be a real sore for the government. The other problem is that hospitals will face having to pay staff while not getting any income because they have been forced to close their doors to patients. It's a little crazy."

    This article appeared in the Guardian on October 12, 2010
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Zack Cooper webpage
    Zack Cooper publications webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Monday 20 September 2010

    Hurriyet Daily News (Turkey): Top economist voices concern about second global dip

    There is a high possibility that a second economic dip in the U.S. economy could occur, triggering a “snowball effect” throughout the rest of the world, according to a prominent London-based economist. “If someone had asked me about the direction of the economy eight months ago, I would have said the risk had receded,” John Van Reenen, the director of the London-based Centre for Economic Performance, an applied economics research center, recently told the Hürriyet Daily News & Economic Review. “But now, looking at recent data, I am much concerned that we may have a second dip and go back to a recession again.”

    This article appeared in Hurriyet Daily News (Turkey) on September 20, 2010
    Link to article

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    John Van Reenen publications webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Wednesday 05 May 2010

    Public Finance Magazine: UK efforts to cut carbon emissions are ineffective

    A study from the Centre for Economic Performance based at the London School of Economics, also concluded that carbon taxes hit the poor hardest, as low-income groups spend proportionally more on fuel and energy-intensive goods such as food.

    This article appeared in Public Finance Magazine on 5 May 2010 Link to article

    Related publications
    CEP Election Analysis ‘Climate Change: Consensus on the long-run targets – but will we get policies that deliver?’ by Ralf Martin download
    CEP Policy Analysis ‘Still time to reclaim the European Union Emissions Trading System for the European tax payer’ Ralf Martin, Mirabelle Muûls and Ulrich J. Wagner, May 2010 download


    Wednesday 05 May 2010

    Public Finance Magazine: UK efforts to cut carbon emissions are ineffective

    A study from the Centre for Economic Performance based at the London School of Economics, also concluded that carbon taxes hit the poor hardest, as low-income groups spend proportionally more on fuel and energy-intensive goods such as food.

    This article appeared in Public Finance Magazine on 5 May 2010 Link to article

    Related publications
    CEP Election Analysis ‘Climate Change: Consensus on the long-run targets – but will we get policies that deliver?’ by Ralf Martin download
    CEP Policy Analysis ‘Still time to reclaim the European Union Emissions Trading System for the European tax payer’ Ralf Martin, Mirabelle Muûls and Ulrich J. Wagner, May 2010 download


    Saturday 01 May 2010

    Daily Telegraph: General Election 2010: public sector pain – it's tougher than it looks

    In the last leader’s debate, Conservative plans to abolish Regional Development Agencies were heatedly discussed, and throughout the campaign both the Tories and Labour have attacked Liberal Democrat plans for a regionally-sensitive immigration policy. It has been policy-wonk heaven. Except that as so often, the clashes between the three leaders have succeeded in generating more heat than light. The reliance of certain regions on government money is the result of a range of complex economic and political factors – and is not easy to fix. 'There are, of course, places that are doing badly,’ says Henry Overman Director of the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the London School of Economics. “But the gaps we see between regions are largely the result of other factors, such as general wage inequality, rather than geographical ones.’

    This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 1 May 2010 Link to article

    Related publication
    CEP Election Analysis ‘Urban Renewal and Regional Growth: Muddled Objectives and Mixed Progress’ Henry Overman
    CEP Election Analysis site link

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website


    Tuesday 27 April 2010

    New York Times: Cities do it better

    An abundance of employers also enables young workers to find their life’s calling by experimenting at different jobs — waiting tables, acting on Broadway, trading long bonds, etc. Henry Overman and Diego Puga’s chapter in Agglomeration Economics, tests this idea, which is often called “labor pooling.”

    This article appeared in the New York Times on 27 Aptil 2010 Link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Diego Puga webpage
    SERC website webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Monday 26 April 2010

    CEP Election Analysis: Urban Renewal and Regional Growth: Muddled Objectives and Mixed Progress

    Since 1997, the Labour government has spent considerable sums trying to narrow the gap between poor areas - neighbourhoods, cities and regions - and the rest. The latest CEP Election Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) considers the evidence on the effects of some of these policy initiatives, with a focus on the role of 'area-based initiatives', which try to improve outcomes in particular areas.

    According to author Professor Henry Overman, the evidence suggests that progress against objectives has been mixed. This is unsurprising: the economic processes that drive differences across cities and regions of the UK are poorly understood and what evidence we do have has played little part in the formulation of policy. As a result, there is confusion about what urban and regional policy could and should try to achieve - and the parties' positions tend to be based on belief rather than evidence.

    The publication is summarised below and can be found in full on the CEP Election Analysis Site

    For further information, contact Romesh Vaitilingam on 07768 661095 (Email: romesh@vaitilingam.com) or Henry Overman (Email: h.g.overman@lse.ac.uk).

    Urban Renewal and Regional Growth: Muddled Objectives and Mixed Progress
    • Since 1997, Labour has committed to improve the UK's 'underperforming' neighbourhoods, cities and regions.

    • The public service agreement on regional growth commits the government to 'improve the economic performance of all English regions and reduce the gap in economic growth rates between regions'. There is little evidence of significant progress against this objective.

    • The role played by the regional development agencies (RDAs) is hard to assess. There is no compelling evidence on whether RDAs are a good or bad thing.

    • The government has also committed considerable resources to trying to improve outcomes in deprived neighbourhoods. Expenditures have provided important public goods, for example, improved social housing. But there appears to have been little progress in narrowing the gap between the outcomes for the most seriously disadvantaged individuals and the rest.

    • As with RDA expenditure, it is difficult to get compelling evidence on the impact of these initiatives. Based on the best evidence that we have available (for the New Deal for Communities), a reasonably well-funded 'area-based initiative' has not, on average, improved individual outcomes in targeted areas.

    • Some argue that there can be no assumption that 'success' is best measured by what happens to individuals as opposed to what happens to areas. Most economists would disagree with this suggestion: they view improving places as a means to an end rather than as an end in itself.

    • Understandably, constituency-based politicians often care about area outcomes irrespective of the effect on individuals. Add to this the fact that voluntary 'sorting' in response to initiatives makes their impact very hard to evaluate and it is clear why the thinking of all political parties on the objectives for - and effectiveness of - spatial policy remains muddled.
    Download CEP Election Analysis - Urban Renewal and Regional Growth: Muddled Objectives and Mixed Progress (in Adobe PDF)



    Sunday 25 April 2010

    World Socialist Web Site: What is the situation facing immigrants and asylum seekers in Britain?

    A report by the London School of Economics shows that the UK has a lower share of immigrants in its population (10.2 percent) than Australia (25 percent), the US (13.6 percent), Germany (12.9 percent) and the Netherlands (10.7 percent).

    This article appeared on the World Socialist Web Site on 25 April 2010. Link to article

    Related links
    ‘Immigration and the UK Labour Market: The Evidence from Economic Research’ Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Election Analysis, April 2010
    CEP Election Analyses
    Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Related publications
    ‘On the Relative Gains to Immigration: A Comparison of the Labour Market Position of Indians in the USA, the UK and India’, Jonathan Wadsworth and Augustin de Coulon, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.851, February 2008 Link to article
    ‘The Labour Market Effects of Immigration’, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, CentrePiece article, Centre for Economic Performance, Winter 2007/2008 Link to article
    ‘The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Male Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain’, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.754, October 2006 Link to article


    Thursday 15 April 2010

    Wales online: Breaking the bonds of dependency

    Prof Lord Richard Layard of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, argues that a job guarantee scheme must be introduced to impact on the UKs long-term unemployment.

    This article appeared in Wales Online on 15 April 2010. Link to article

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Richard Layard publications webpage


    Tuesday 15 December 2009

    Times: The eclipse stakes

    The action by striking workers at BA shows flagrant disregard for its customers. It is also reckless with the company in such a poor state, comments a Times editorial. "Even allowing for the selfishly narrow motivation of the workforce, the strike is highly unlikely to pay off. A study of strikes in the 1980s by economists at the London School of Economics found that the average increase in annual pay produced by strikes was only 0.3 per cent, while the average strike lasted 11 days."

    This article appeared in the Times on December 15, 2009
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    ‘Do Strikes Pay?’, Peter Ingram, David Metcalf and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.92, August 1992 (hard copy only)
    'Do Strikes Pay?', in New Perspectives on Industrial Disputes, David Metcalf and Simon Milner (Eds.), Routledge, USA & UK, 1993.

    Related Links
    David Metcalf webpage
    Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Tuesday 15 December 2009

    Times: The eclipse stakes

    The action by striking workers at BA shows flagrant disregard for its customers. It is also reckless with the company in such a poor state, comments a Times editorial. "Even allowing for the selfishly narrow motivation of the workforce, the strike is highly unlikely to pay off. A study of strikes in the 1980s by economists at the London School of Economics found that the average increase in annual pay produced by strikes was only 0.3 per cent, while the average strike lasted 11 days."

    This article appeared in the Times on December 15, 2009
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    ‘Do Strikes Pay?’, Peter Ingram, David Metcalf and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.92, August 1992 (hard copy only)
    'Do Strikes Pay?', in New Perspectives on Industrial Disputes, David Metcalf and Simon Milner (Eds.), Routledge, USA & UK, 1993.

    Related Links
    David Metcalf webpage
    Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Sunday 13 December 2009

    Times Online - UK: Anthony Seldon: Teaching Wellington College new tricks

    He found the works of Martin Seligman, an American guru of positive psychology; Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence; and Richard Layard a professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), who had just published Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Such works “provided a framework for what I’d been feeling and thinking for a long time”, says Seldon.

    This article appeared on Times Online on 13 December 2009. Link to article

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Happiness Research webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Sunday 13 December 2009

    Times Online - UK: Anthony Seldon: Teaching Wellington College new tricks

    He found the works of Martin Seligman, an American guru of positive psychology; Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence; and Richard Layard a professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), who had just published Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Such works “provided a framework for what I’d been feeling and thinking for a long time”, says Seldon.

    This article appeared on Times Online on 13 December 2009. Link to article

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Happiness Research webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Friday 27 November 2009

    Bloomberg TV ''Countdown'' programme: LInda Yueh

    Linda Yueh interviewed, to comment on the EU-China relationship and the valuation of the Chinese currency.

    This interview was broadcast on Bloomberg on 27 November 2009. (no link available)

    Related links
    Linda Yueh webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage


    Friday 27 November 2009

    Bloomberg TV ''Countdown'' programme: LInda Yueh

    Linda Yueh interviewed, to comment on the EU-China relationship and the valuation of the Chinese currency.

    This interview was broadcast on Bloomberg on 27 November 2009. (no link available)

    Related links
    Linda Yueh webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage


    Friday 27 November 2009

    Bloomberg TV ''Countdown'' programme: LInda Yueh

    Linda Yueh interviewed, to comment on the EU-China relationship and the valuation of the Chinese currency.

    This interview was broadcast on Bloomberg on 27 November 2009. (no link available)

    Related links
    Linda Yueh webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage


    Sunday 08 November 2009

    Free Market Mojo - blog: Did the National Minimum Wage affect UK prices?

    Jonathan Wadsworth has a relatively new discussion paper looking into how the national minimum wage affected UK prices.

    This article appeared on the blog 'Free Market Mojo' on November 8, 2009
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    ‘Did the National Minimum Wage Affect UK Prices?’, Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.947, August 2009

    Related Links
    Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Tuesday 06 October 2009

    Trueslant – blog: Julia Ioffe (The Moscow Diaries, USA)

    A new study by London School of Economics professor Matti Sarvimäki finds that the Soviet invasion of Finland in 1939, which displaced over 430,000 Finns, was the geopolitical equivalent of your parents serving you with an eviction notice. The study reveals that thousands of Finnish men, though tragically cut loose by the illegal and poorly-executed invasion that may have cemented Hitler’s decision to invade the USSR, ended up earning substantially more than Finnish men not unmoored by the Winter War. This article appeared on Trueslant.com on 6 October 2009. Link to article

    Related publications
    ‘The Unexpected Consequences of Forced Migration’ Matti Sarvimäki, Roope Uusitalo and Markus Jäntti in CentrePiece Vol. 14 Issue 2, Autumn 2009 pages: 24-26.
    ‘Long-term Effects of Forced Migration’ Matti Sarvimäki, Roope Uusitalo and Markus Jäntti, SERC Discussion Paper No. 15, March 2009

    Related links
    Matti Sarvimäki webpage
    SERC (Spatial Economics Research Centre) webpage


    Monday 24 August 2009

    Forbes.com: Joblessness has a lasting psychological impact, particularly on those with existing mental health problems

    Depression factor. This last issue has become a much more significant aspect of public policy in the last few years, associated in particular with economist Richard Layard, who argues in his 2006 study, "The Depression Report," that the effect of mental illness on happiness is underestimated and that mental illness is related to labor market experience.

    This article appeared on Forbes.com on 24th August 2009. Link to article

    Related Publications
    The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders Download report

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Richard Layard publications webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    Monday 08 June 2009

    MSN Money: Late Rally brings Market Back

    Today's late-day rally was triggered in part by a comment from Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman that the U.S. economy may start to emerge from the recession in September, Bloomberg News reported. Krugman made the comment at a lecture at the London School of Economics.

    This article appeared on MSN Money on 8th June 2009 Link to article

    Paul Krugman: The Return of Depression Economics.
    For details of the lectures and access to the podcasts go to Lionel Robbins Lectures 2009 .

    Monday 08 June 2009

    MSN Money: Late Rally brings Market Back

    Today's late-day rally was triggered in part by a comment from Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman that the U.S. economy may start to emerge from the recession in September, Bloomberg News reported. Krugman made the comment at a lecture at the London School of Economics.

    This article appeared on MSN Money on 8th June 2009 Link to article

    Paul Krugman: The Return of Depression Economics.
    For details of the lectures and access to the podcasts go to Lionel Robbins Lectures 2009 .

    Thursday 28 May 2009

    Financial Times: Labour to put faith in 'job guarantee'

    Labour is considering putting a "job guarantee" for anyone unemployed for 18 months at the heart of its election manifesto, as ministers seek ways to offer hope to victims of the recession. The idea for the policy came in a Budget submission to ministers by Paul Gregg, of the Centre for Economic Performance and Bristol University, and Lord Layard, of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on May 28, 2009
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Paul Gregg webpage
    Richard Layard webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Thursday 28 May 2009

    Financial Times: Labour to put faith in 'job guarantee'

    Labour is considering putting a "job guarantee" for anyone unemployed for 18 months at the heart of its election manifesto, as ministers seek ways to offer hope to victims of the recession. The idea for the policy came in a Budget submission to ministers by Paul Gregg, of the Centre for Economic Performance and Bristol University, and Lord Layard, of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on May 28, 2009
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Paul Gregg webpage
    Richard Layard webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Thursday 28 May 2009

    Financial Times: Labour to put faith in 'job guarantee'

    Labour is considering putting a "job guarantee" for anyone unemployed for 18 months at the heart of its election manifesto, as ministers seek ways to offer hope to victims of the recession. The idea for the policy came in a Budget submission to ministers by Paul Gregg, of the Centre for Economic Performance and Bristol University, and Lord Layard, of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on May 28, 2009
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Paul Gregg webpage
    Richard Layard webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Tuesday 05 May 2009

    Mercado: Por un capitalismo que sea menos egoísta

    Un catedrático inglés, Sir Richard Layard, publicó recientemente en el Financial Times una columna que no pasó desapercibida. En ella pidió abandonar la adoración del dinero y crear una sociedad más humana.

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    Tuesday 05 May 2009

    Mercado: Por un capitalismo que sea menos egoísta

    Un catedrático inglés, Sir Richard Layard, publicó recientemente en el Financial Times una columna que no pasó desapercibida. En ella pidió abandonar la adoración del dinero y crear una sociedad más humana.

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    Sunday 22 March 2009

    The Guardian: It's time to give up our blind faith in economic growth

    "This focus on growth fails to take account of what the social and psychological evidence tells us," says the economist Richard Layard.

    This article appeared in the Guardian on the 22nd March. Link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Details

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness research webpage


    Sunday 22 March 2009

    The Guardian: It's time to give up our blind faith in economic growth

    "This focus on growth fails to take account of what the social and psychological evidence tells us," says the economist Richard Layard.

    This article appeared in the Guardian on the 22nd March. Link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Details

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness research webpage


    Friday 20 March 2009

    BBC News Channel: BBC News

    Linda Yueh interviewed, to discuss the NAO report on the government's handling of Northern Rock and lessons from the management of the financial crisis.

    This interview was broadcast on BBC news channel the 20th March 2009.
    [No link avaliable]

    Related Links
    Linda Yueh webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage


    Monday 16 March 2009

    Scotland on Sunday - Edinburgh,Scotland,UK: Bill Jamieson: If finance capitalism really is dead what system ...

    As for the advocates of 'social' banking, Professor Richard Layard – he of 'happiness economics' – has weighed into the 'whither capitalism' debate with a call to "stop the worship of money and create a more humane society where the quality of human experience is the criterion". However, even this virtuous paradise will need a banking system we can trust to take deposits and lend money.

    This article appeared in Scotland on Sunday on the 16th March 2009. Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Details

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness research webpage


    Monday 16 March 2009

    Scotland on Sunday - Edinburgh,Scotland,UK: Bill Jamieson: If finance capitalism really is dead what system ...

    As for the advocates of 'social' banking, Professor Richard Layard – he of 'happiness economics' – has weighed into the 'whither capitalism' debate with a call to "stop the worship of money and create a more humane society where the quality of human experience is the criterion". However, even this virtuous paradise will need a banking system we can trust to take deposits and lend money.

    This article appeared in Scotland on Sunday on the 16th March 2009. Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Details

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness research webpage


    Friday 06 March 2009

    Reformatorisch Dagblad, Netherlands: Geloof en geweld vaak ten onrechte met elkaar verbonden

    Richard Layard (zelf een atheïst) presenteert in zijn Lionel Robins Lecture in 2002 een overzichtstabel van de literatuur naar de factoren die menselijk ...

    This article appeared in Reformatorisch Dagblad on 6th March 2009.
    Link to article.

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    Friday 06 March 2009

    Reformatorisch Dagblad, Netherlands: Geloof en geweld vaak ten onrechte met elkaar verbonden

    Richard Layard (zelf een atheïst) presenteert in zijn Lionel Robins Lecture in 2002 een overzichtstabel van de literatuur naar de factoren die menselijk ...

    This article appeared in Reformatorisch Dagblad on 6th March 2009.
    Link to article.

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    Wednesday 11 February 2009

    LSE Public Lecture: A Good Childhood: searching for values in a competitive age

    This public lecture was held on Wednesday 11 February 2009, in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE.

    Speakers: Professor Judy Dunn, Professor Lord Richard Layard

    Is childhood all it should be? Or has it been spoilt by broken homes, junk food, alcohol and exam stress? The speakers will present the findings of The Good Childhood Inquiry.

    Judy Dunn is professor of developmental psychology at King’s College London, and was chair of The Good Childhood Inquiry. Richard Layard is director of the Well-being Programme in the LSE Centre for Economic Performance.

    Listen to the Podcast: MP3



    Wednesday 11 February 2009

    LSE Public Lecture: A Good Childhood: searching for values in a competitive age

    This public lecture was held on Wednesday 11 February 2009, in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE.

    Speakers: Professor Judy Dunn, Professor Lord Richard Layard

    Is childhood all it should be? Or has it been spoilt by broken homes, junk food, alcohol and exam stress? The speakers will present the findings of The Good Childhood Inquiry.

    Judy Dunn is professor of developmental psychology at King’s College London, and was chair of The Good Childhood Inquiry. Richard Layard is director of the Well-being Programme in the LSE Centre for Economic Performance.

    Listen to the Podcast: MP3



    Wednesday 11 February 2009

    LSE Public Lecture: A Good Childhood: searching for values in a competitive age

    This public lecture was held on Wednesday 11 February 2009, in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE.

    Speakers: Professor Judy Dunn, Professor Lord Richard Layard

    Is childhood all it should be? Or has it been spoilt by broken homes, junk food, alcohol and exam stress? The speakers will present the findings of The Good Childhood Inquiry.

    Judy Dunn is professor of developmental psychology at King’s College London, and was chair of The Good Childhood Inquiry. Richard Layard is director of the Well-being Programme in the LSE Centre for Economic Performance.

    Listen to the Podcast: MP3



    Wednesday 11 February 2009

    LSE Public Lecture: A Good Childhood: searching for values in a competitive age

    This public lecture was held on Wednesday 11 February 2009, in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE.

    Speakers: Professor Judy Dunn, Professor Lord Richard Layard

    Is childhood all it should be? Or has it been spoilt by broken homes, junk food, alcohol and exam stress? The speakers will present the findings of The Good Childhood Inquiry.

    Judy Dunn is professor of developmental psychology at King’s College London, and was chair of The Good Childhood Inquiry. Richard Layard is director of the Well-being Programme in the LSE Centre for Economic Performance.

    Listen to the Podcast: MP3



    Wednesday 11 February 2009

    LSE Public Lecture: A Good Childhood: searching for values in a competitive age

    This public lecture was held on Wednesday 11 February 2009, in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE.

    Speakers: Professor Judy Dunn, Professor Lord Richard Layard

    Is childhood all it should be? Or has it been spoilt by broken homes, junk food, alcohol and exam stress? The speakers will present the findings of The Good Childhood Inquiry.

    Judy Dunn is professor of developmental psychology at King’s College London, and was chair of The Good Childhood Inquiry. Richard Layard is director of the Well-being Programme in the LSE Centre for Economic Performance.

    Listen to the Podcast: MP3



    Saturday 31 January 2009

    BBC News Channel: BBC News

    Linda Yueh was interviewed to comment on UK-China relations with the visit of Chinese Premier Wen.

    This interview was broadcast on BBC News on the 31st January 2009.
    [No link avaliable]

    Related links
    Linda Yueh webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage


    Friday 30 January 2009

    Radio Lithuania: ''Ryto Garsai''(Morning)

    Linda Yueh interviewed on the 'News Map' segment on reforming the international economic system.

    This interview was broadcast on Radio Lithuania on the 30th January 2009.
    [No link avaliable]

    Linda Yueh webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage


    Tuesday 20 January 2009

    The Financial: Obama's LSE alumni

    Two LSE economics professors have paid tribute to the brilliance of Barack Obama’s new budget director Peter Orszag, who is one of an impressive retinue of LSE alumni appointed to the president-elect’s administration. Professor Emeritus Lord Richard Layard was so impressed with Orszag’s work as a Masters student that he invited him to Moscow in 1992 in the early post-Soviet period to work on the influential monthly publication Russian Economic Trends. 'I invited him to Russia because he was a brilliant, outstanding chap,' said Professor Layard.

    This article appeared in the Financial on 20th January 2009. [No link avaliable]

    Related Publications
    ‘The Conditions of Life’, A. Illarionov, R. Layard and P. Orszag, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 165, August 1993.
    ‘Dumping on Free Trade: The US Import Trade Laws’, P. Orszag and J. Stiglitz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 210, October 1994.

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage


    Tuesday 20 January 2009

    The Financial: Obama's LSE alumni

    Two LSE economics professors have paid tribute to the brilliance of Barack Obama’s new budget director Peter Orszag, who is one of an impressive retinue of LSE alumni appointed to the president-elect’s administration. Professor Emeritus Lord Richard Layard was so impressed with Orszag’s work as a Masters student that he invited him to Moscow in 1992 in the early post-Soviet period to work on the influential monthly publication Russian Economic Trends. 'I invited him to Russia because he was a brilliant, outstanding chap,' said Professor Layard.

    This article appeared in the Financial on 20th January 2009. [No link avaliable]

    Related Publications
    ‘The Conditions of Life’, A. Illarionov, R. Layard and P. Orszag, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 165, August 1993.
    ‘Dumping on Free Trade: The US Import Trade Laws’, P. Orszag and J. Stiglitz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 210, October 1994.

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage


    Thursday 11 December 2008

    Republika, Serbia: Crni (finansijski) oktobar u Velikoj Britaniji

    ... je nego u svim vecim razvijenijim državama (‘Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain’, Centre for Economic Performance – LSE, 2007).

    This article appeared in Republika, Serbia.
    Related Publications
    Project Summary Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
    Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
    Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
    Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling
    by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005


    Related Links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Paul Gregg webpage
    Steve Machin webpage
    Alissa Goodman webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Tuesday 02 December 2008

    RBC Daily - Russia: Linda Yueh interviewed

    Linda Yueh was interviewed by Vladimir Pavlov on Chinese growth and rural subsidies.

    This article appeared in RBC Daily, Russia on the 2nd December 2008.
    Link to article.


    Related Links
    Linda Yueh webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Tuesday 02 December 2008

    RBC Daily - Russia: Linda Yueh interviewed

    Linda Yueh was interviewed by Vladimir Pavlov on Chinese growth and rural subsidies.

    This article appeared in RBC Daily, Russia on the 2nd December 2008.
    Link to article.


    Related Links
    Linda Yueh webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Tuesday 18 November 2008

    The Guardian: Response I did not stammer when the Queen asked me about the meltdown

    Professor Luis Garicano, director of research at the department of management, London School of Economics, comments on the Queen discussing the economy with him.

    This article appeared in the The Guardian on the 18th of November 2008. Link to article.

    Related Links
    Professor Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Friday 14 November 2008

    Al Jazeera English: Frost Over the World

    Linda Yueh spoke on the G20 economic summit.

    This interview was broadcast on Al Jazeera on the 14th of November 2008.
    (No link avaliable)

    Related Links
    Linda Yueh webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Linda Yueh was also interviewed on:
    BBC Four“World News Today”
    BBC World News “World News Today”
    BBC Radio 5 “Breakfast”

    Thursday 23 October 2008

    The Guardian: Cost of child poverty is at least 25bn a year

    Researchers have found that the government spends £12bn a year on services to remedy consequences of childhood deprivation such as poor health, low educational attainment, crime and antisocial behaviour. Although not mentioned, Jo Blanden and Steve Machin of CEP wrote the background report to this report from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

    This article appeared in the Guardian on the 23rd of October 2008.
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Estimating the costs of child poverty by Donald Hirsch is based on three reports, one of which is ‘The GDP Cost of the Lost Earning Potential of Adults Who Grew Up in Poverty’ by Jo Blanden, Kirstine Hansen and Stephen Machin

    Link to article
    Related Links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Kirstine Hansen webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage


    Monday 22 September 2008

    Grant Awarded: SERC researchers granted NHPAU Research Innovation Fund awards to help study housing affordability

    Research led by economic geographer Dr Christian Hilber, of the London School of Economic and Political Science is one of 3 chosen studies granted a National Housing and Planning Advice Unit (NHPAU) Research Innovation Fund award.

    The project - The Effects of Supply Constraints on Housing Costs: Empirical Evidence for England and Assessment of Policy Implications - will assess to what extent legal or planning constraints in different parts of the country affect the cost of land, and how this relates to differing housing affordability problems across the regions and sub-regions.

    Another project led by housing economist Professor John Muellbauer has also been awarded. Mortgage Possessions in the UK: a Regional and National Analysis seeks to understand the causes of recent increases in the rates of mortgage possessions and will attempt to forecast future trends at a national and regional level.

    For further details about the projects and the award please see the NHPAU RIF press release (in Adobe PDF).

    The National Housing and Planning Advice Unit (NHPAU), the independent body set up to advise all levels of government on housing supply and affordability, has announced the first awards from its Research Innovation Fund - set up earlier this year to drive forward research into housing affordability issues.

    Reported 22 September 2008

    Sunday 08 June 2008

    Independent - Ireland: A trouble shared can be a trouble doubled

    Just when happiness economist Richard Layard is trying to persuade the British to dispose of their stiff upper lips and embrace cognitive therapy, along come a crowd of Yanks telling them that that the Royals' mantra was right all along: "Don't explain, don't complain."

    This article appeared in the Independent - Ireland on June 8, 2008
    Link to article

    Related publications
    The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

    Related links Richard Layard webpage
    The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage


    Wednesday 04 June 2008

    Vox: Will the credit crunch lead to recession?

    Nick Bloom’s column argues that the wave of uncertainty troubling the markets will likely induce a recession – and render policy instruments powerless to prevent it.

    This article appeared online in Vox on June 4, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession? by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1, Spring 2008
    What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007
    Joint McKinsey/CEP Report, Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and John Van Reenen, July 2007.

    Related links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Further press cuttings
    Wall Street Journal
    Secondary sources: recession?, Obama bailout, $4 gas
    Writing for the voxeu blog, Nicholas Bloom says that the credit crisis will likely lead to recession. “So the current situation is a perfect storm — a huge surge in uncertainty that is not only generating a rapid slowdown in activity but also limiting the effectiveness of standard monetary and fiscal policy to prevent this.”

    Economist's View (blog site)
    Will the credit crunch lead to recession?
    Nick Bloom’s article argues that "A recession looks likely," and that policy won't be able to prevent it from happening.

    Saturday 14 June
    Kathimerini (Greece)
    "The credit crisis will probably lead to widespread recession." Article by Nick Bloom on how the credit crunch is inevitable given the state of uncertainty in the markets.
    Link to article

    Wednesday 04 June 2008

    Resource Investor: Will the credit crunch lead to recession?

    In an article for Resource Investor, Nick Bloom writes "Much like the credit crunch today, the Great Depression began with a stock market crash and a meltdown of the financial system."

    This article appeared in Resource Investor (Herndon, VA, USA) on June 4, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession? by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1, Spring 2008
    What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007
    Joint McKinsey/CEP Report, Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and John Van Reenen, July 2007.

    Related links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Thursday 22 May 2008

    RBC Daily: Russian news

    Linda Yueh was interviewed for an article on the economic losses stemming from the earthquake in China:

    This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on May 22, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Linda Yueh webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Monday 05 May 2008

    Reuters: Risks mount for stressed traders as markets gyrate

    Two Citigroup workers , including a trader, fell from office blocks in London and Miami in 2006. ‘The pressure on traders when the market goes wrong is always huge,’ said Tim Leunig, a lecturer in the economic history department at London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). ‘There will be a lot of bitten fingernails today. It is exactly the same, you can lose you job, your standard of living and you won't get it back, that's pressure.’

    This article appeared in Reuters news on May 5, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Tim Leunig webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Also in
    Birmingham Post
    Rise in suicides as credit crunch stress gets to traders

    Friday 18 April 2008

    People Management: HRD 2008: Influx of Chinese talent 'a mixed blessing'

    Linda Yueh’s recent speech at the Human Resource Development 2008 Conference was covered in People Management magazine. (subscribe to access full article)

    This article appeared in the People Management magazine on April 18, 2008
    Link to article and subscribe

    Related Links
    Linda Yueh webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Thursday 17 April 2008

    Financial Times: Visible measure that help reduce absenteeism

    According to a London School of Economics' analysis of health and well-being policies across the group, such initiatives have saved the Royal Mail as much as £227m over three years by cutting absence across its 180,000 strong workforce from seven to just under five per cent between 2004 and 2007.

    The article is referring to the Centre for Economic Performance Royal Mail study by David Marsden.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on April 17, 2008
    [No working link available]

    Related Publications
    'Human Resource Practices and Employment Stability: Evidence from the European Structure of Earning Survey - ESES', by Simone Moriconi and David Marsden, work in progress
    'Incentive Pay Systems and the Management of Human Resources in France and Great Britain', by Richard Belfield, Salima Benhamou and David Marsden, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.796, May 2007

    Related links
    David Marsden webpage
    Simone Moriconi webpage
    Pay Inequalities and Economic Performance (PIEP) Programme webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Thursday 17 April 2008

    Financial Times: Visible measure that help reduce absenteeism

    According to a London School of Economics' analysis of health and well-being policies across the group, such initiatives have saved the Royal Mail as much as £227m over three years by cutting absence across its 180,000 strong workforce from seven to just under five per cent between 2004 and 2007.

    The article is referring to the Centre for Economic Performance Royal Mail study by David Marsden.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on April 17, 2008
    [No working link available]

    Related Publications
    'Human Resource Practices and Employment Stability: Evidence from the European Structure of Earning Survey - ESES', by Simone Moriconi and David Marsden, work in progress
    'Incentive Pay Systems and the Management of Human Resources in France and Great Britain', by Richard Belfield, Salima Benhamou and David Marsden, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.796, May 2007

    Related links
    David Marsden webpage
    Simone Moriconi webpage
    Pay Inequalities and Economic Performance (PIEP) Programme webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Wednesday 16 April 2008

    RBC Daily (Russia): Linda Yueh interviewed

    Linda Yueh was interviewed commenting on China's sovereign wealth fund investments in energy companies such as BP and Total.

    This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on April 16, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Linda Yueh webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Tuesday 15 April 2008

    CBC.CA News (Toronto, Ontario, Canada): Tired of looking on the bright side? Me too, I think (Richard Handler: The ideas guy)

    I reach for Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. He is no mere psychologist. He is an economist who has aptly summarized all the research in this field. He also sits in Britain's House of Lords. This is a very upbeat book for an economist. But then, the investigative side of me wants to conclude, sitting in the House of Lords must have its advantages.

    This article appeared in CBC.ca News (Toronto, Ontario, Canada) on April 15, 2008
    Link to article

    Related publication
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness research webpage

    Wednesday 09 April 2008

    ABC Radio International: Smoking economics

    Smoking bans in public places are often just shifting the problem, according to an international researcher. UK economist Francesca Cornaglia has analysed American data and found that non-smokers at home, including children, are the losers, given that smokers are prevented from smoking in restaurants, cinemas and the like.

    This interview was broadcast on ABC Radio International - 'Life Matters' on April 9, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    'Private versus Public Smoke Exposure', Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, work in progress
    Taxes, Cigarette Consumption and Smoking Intensity by Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, American Economic Review, Vol.96, Issue 4, September 2006

    Related links
    Francesca Cornaglia webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage


    Monday 07 April 2008

    ABC News online (Australia): Cigarette price hike 'leads to more intense smoking'

    Francesca Cornaglia spoke at the Australian National University in Canberra to challenge several policies aimed at reducing the harm associated with smoking.

    This article appeared on ABC News online (Australia) on April 7, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    'Private versus Public Smoke Exposure', Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, work in progress
    Taxes, Cigarette Consumption and Smoking Intensity by Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, American Economic Review, Vol.96, Issue 4, September 2006

    Related links
    Francesca Cornaglia webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage


    Monday 03 March 2008

    Handelsblatt: Mehr Wettbewerb kann töen - zentrale Lohnfindung auch

    Competition study covered in the "Wissenswert" column, together with a related study by Carol Propper, Emma Hall and John Van Reenen.

    This article appeared in Handelsblatt (Germany) on March 3, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    'Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance’ by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
    'Centralised Pay Setting Kills Finds New Research', Press Release, LSE Press and Information News online

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Emma Hall webpage
    Carol Propper webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Thursday 14 February 2008

    The Times: Damage to unborn baby from smoking 'negligible' in the first five months

    Smoking in pregnancy is far less damaging to the unborn baby than commonly supposed, detailed analysis suggests. If women give up smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, the effect on the baby is negligible, the study found. And even if they do not, the effect on birthweight is surprisingly small. The study by Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, throws new light on government efforts to stop women smoking when they become pregnant.

    This article appeared in The Times on February 14, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
    The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

    Related links
    Emma Tominey webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage


    Thursday 14 February 2008

    The Times: Damage to unborn baby from smoking 'negligible' in the first five months

    Smoking in pregnancy is far less damaging to the unborn baby than commonly supposed, detailed analysis suggests. If women give up smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, the effect on the baby is negligible, the study found. And even if they do not, the effect on birthweight is surprisingly small. The study by Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, throws new light on government efforts to stop women smoking when they become pregnant.

    This article appeared in The Times on February 14, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
    The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

    Related links
    Emma Tominey webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage


    Thursday 14 February 2008

    The Times: Damage to unborn baby from smoking 'negligible' in the first five months

    Smoking in pregnancy is far less damaging to the unborn baby than commonly supposed, detailed analysis suggests. If women give up smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, the effect on the baby is negligible, the study found. And even if they do not, the effect on birthweight is surprisingly small. The study by Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, throws new light on government efforts to stop women smoking when they become pregnant.

    This article appeared in The Times on February 14, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
    The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

    Related links
    Emma Tominey webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage


    Sunday 10 February 2008

    Little India: What price happiness?

    Says Richard Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics and author of the 2005 book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science: ‘People don't want to think they live in a world of ruthless competition where everyone is against everyone. Valuable things are being lost, such as community values, solidarity.’

    This article appeared in Little India online on February 10, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness research webpage

    Further press cuttings
    Monday 11 February
    Daily Telegraph
    Family holidays: the expert's advice
    Holidays, according to Professor Richard Layard, author of Happiness: A New Science, are vital to personal wellbeing. They are also, he says, extremely important for families.

    Friday 08 February 2008

    The Business: Job creation schemes

    Something that is part of the point of such schemes, as pointed out by Richard Layard who is the intellectual father of them.

    This article appeared in The Business on February 8, 2008
    Link to article

    Related publications
    'Welfare to Work and the New Deal' by Richard Layard, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.15, January 2001
    Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    Friday 08 February 2008

    The Business: Job creation schemes

    Something that is part of the point of such schemes, as pointed out by Richard Layard who is the intellectual father of them.

    This article appeared in The Business on February 8, 2008
    Link to article

    Related publications
    'Welfare to Work and the New Deal' by Richard Layard, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.15, January 2001
    Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    Sunday 03 February 2008

    Observer: Why too much care for your child can harm society

    A recent London School of Economics report shows that Britain has the highest number of family firms managed by children of the founder; it is a managerial disaster, a potent explanation of our poor productivity. Few think to challenge the practice or endorse the call for higher inheritance tax to check it.

    This article appeared in the Observer on February 3, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK’s Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom, CEP Policy Analysis
    Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

    Related Links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Wednesday 30 January 2008

    BBC News: Handing it down

    Nick Bloom has studied the management of family firms where the father passes the business on to the eldest son. “We looked at 5,000 companies and we found that around a third of the medium-sized manufacturing firms were family owned. In about half of them the eldest son was the CEO. They are very badly managed.”

    This article appeared on BBC News on January 30, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    CEP Policy Analysis, Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK’s Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom
    Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

    Related Links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Friday 18 January 2008

    The Times: Middle class 'monopolise' the best schools

    The Cambridge Primary Review – the biggest study of primary schools for decades – recommends that catchment areas should be scrapped because only wealthy parents can afford to buy houses next to the best primaries. Instead, oversubscribed schools would use a lottery system. The research, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, from the University of London, found that admissions procedures exacerbated inequalities.

    This article appeared in The Times on January 18, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

    Related links
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Sandra McNally webpage
    Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Further press cuttings
    Press Association
    End catchment areas, report urges
    Research published as part of the Cambridge University-based Primary Review called for a radical overhaul of school admissions to give working class families more choice. Professor Stephen Machin and Dr Sandra McNally, from the University of London, warned that divisions between rich and poor have been incrasingin recent decades. "It is possible that some aspects of primary education discriminate in favour of higher income groups and thereby exacerbate existing inequalities", the report said.

    Friday 18 January 2008

    The Times: Middle class 'monopolise' the best schools

    The Cambridge Primary Review – the biggest study of primary schools for decades – recommends that catchment areas should be scrapped because only wealthy parents can afford to buy houses next to the best primaries. Instead, oversubscribed schools would use a lottery system. The research, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, from the University of London, found that admissions procedures exacerbated inequalities.

    This article appeared in The Times on January 18, 2008
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

    Related links
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Sandra McNally webpage
    Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Further press cuttings
    Press Association
    End catchment areas, report urges
    Research published as part of the Cambridge University-based Primary Review called for a radical overhaul of school admissions to give working class families more choice. Professor Stephen Machin and Dr Sandra McNally, from the University of London, warned that divisions between rich and poor have been incrasingin recent decades. "It is possible that some aspects of primary education discriminate in favour of higher income groups and thereby exacerbate existing inequalities", the report said.

    Thursday 08 November 2007

    Secondary Education.com: Long hours in class do not lead to better jobs

    Children who spend long hours in school do not necessarily perform better, or gain better jobs or higher earnings in adult life, according to a report by Professor Jörn-Steffen Pischke, of the London School of Economics.

    This article appeared in Secondary Education online on November 8, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    The Impact of the Length of the School Year on Student Performance and Earnings: Evidence from the German Short School Years in The Economic Journal, 117, October 2007, pp.1216-1242

    Related links
    Steve Pischke webpage
    Labour Markets webpage

    Monday 29 October 2007

    The Daily Telegraph: New homes target 'not enough to avert crisis'

    Government plans to build three million more homes by 2020 are nowhere near enough to avert a crisis that could see an entire generation unable to get on the property ladder, a report by the independent body – the National Housing and Planning Advice Unit - has warned. Stephen Nickell, one of the study's authors, said yesterday: "If we fail to act then a generation of buyers will be unable to get a foothold on the housing ladder, not just in London, but across large swathes of England."

    This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on October 29, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Stephen Nickell is an Associate of the Labour Markets Research Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
    Stephen Nickell webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Friday 14 September 2007

    THES: Laurie Taylor column

    What is your degree worth to an employer? According to Anna Vignoles, a leading education economist, student tuition fees should be based on the worth of the degree to employers. Dr Anna Vignoles is a research associate in the Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE.

    This article appeared in the THES on September 14, 2007
    Link to article [subscribers only]

    Related links
    Anna Vignoles webpage
    Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

    Friday 14 September 2007

    THES: Laurie Taylor column

    What is your degree worth to an employer? According to Anna Vignoles, a leading education economist, student tuition fees should be based on the worth of the degree to employers. Dr Anna Vignoles is a research associate in the Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE.

    This article appeared in the THES on September 14, 2007
    Link to article [subscribers only]

    Related links
    Anna Vignoles webpage
    Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

    Thursday 13 September 2007

    The Economist: Labour and the unions - down tools, lads

    Today’s unions are a shadow of those that humiliated James Callaghan’s government in the 1970s. A decade of steady economic growth, says Alex Bryson, has eroded the premium that unionised workers earn over their unorganised brethren.

    This article appeared in The Economist on September 13, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    CEP Press Release ‘Union Blues:  The Bleak Outlook for Most of Britain’s Trade Unions’.
    Download
    ‘Accounting for Collective Action: Resource Acquisition and Mobilisation in British Unions’ by Alex Bryson and Paul Willman, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.768, December 2006.

    Related links
    Alex Bryson webpage
    Paul Willman is Professor in Employment Relations and Organisational Behaviour
    Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

    Friday 07 September 2007

    THES: Repression kick-starts a career in radical violence

    Review of What Makes A Terrorist: Economics and the Roots of Terrorism by Alan Kreuger. The book is based on the three Lionel Robbins lectures Alan Kreuger gave at LSE on ‘What Makes a Terrorist’. (subscription only)

    This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Alan Krueger Princeton University webpage
    Professor Alan Krueger was interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam at the Centre for Economic Performance on 23 February 2006.
    Listen to the interview
    Lionel Robbins Lectures, 'International Terrorism - Causes and Consquences'
    Details

    Friday 07 September 2007

    THES: Repression kick-starts a career in radical violence

    Review of What Makes A Terrorist: Economics and the Roots of Terrorism by Alan Kreuger. The book is based on the three Lionel Robbins lectures Alan Kreuger gave at LSE on ‘What Makes a Terrorist’. (subscription only)

    This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Alan Krueger Princeton University webpage
    Professor Alan Krueger was interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam at the Centre for Economic Performance on 23 February 2006.
    Listen to the interview
    Lionel Robbins Lectures, 'International Terrorism - Causes and Consquences'
    Details

    Friday 07 September 2007

    THES: 'Surplus' in arts may spur shakeout

    Universities should set student tuition fees according to how much a degree subject is valued by employers a leading education economist, Anna Vignoles (Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics), has argued.

    This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
    Link to article

    Related links
    Anna Vignoles webpage
    Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE webpage

    Friday 07 September 2007

    THES: 'Surplus' in arts may spur shakeout

    Universities should set student tuition fees according to how much a degree subject is valued by employers a leading education economist, Anna Vignoles (Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics), has argued.

    This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
    Link to article

    Related links
    Anna Vignoles webpage
    Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE webpage

    Friday 07 September 2007

    THES: 'Surplus' in arts may spur shakeout

    Universities should set student tuition fees according to how much a degree subject is valued by employers a leading education economist, Anna Vignoles (Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics), has argued.

    This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
    Link to article

    Related links
    Anna Vignoles webpage
    Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE webpage

    Friday 07 September 2007

    THES: 'Surplus' in arts may spur shakeout

    Universities should set student tuition fees according to how much a degree subject is valued by employers a leading education economist, Anna Vignoles (Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics), has argued.

    This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
    Link to article

    Related links
    Anna Vignoles webpage
    Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE webpage

    Wednesday 25 July 2007

    Taipei Times: Nurturing your own ideas is key to productivity

    Reinforcement for this view comes from a new report from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance, McKinsey & Co and Stanford University entitled Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter, which supports the common-sense notion that the way firms are managed is one of the most important ways of distinguishing between them.

    This article appeared in the Taipei Times on July 25, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Chrisos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
    Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

    Related links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Raffaella Sadun webpage
    Christos Genakos webpage
    Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
    Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    Tuesday 26 June 2007

    The Financial Times: Adonis wants to raise GCSE top grades target to 80 per cent

    Lord Adonis' call for an ‘80 per cent education system’ came the day after the Sutton Trust education think-tank revealed preliminary research from the London School of Economics showing UK social mobility is lower than in most other developed countries.

    This article appeared in The Financial Times on June 26, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
    Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

    Related links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Paul Gregg webpage
    Steve Machin webpage
    Alissa Goodman webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Tuesday 26 June 2007

    The Financial Times: Adonis wants to raise GCSE top grades target to 80 per cent

    Lord Adonis' call for an ‘80 per cent education system’ came the day after the Sutton Trust education think-tank revealed preliminary research from the London School of Economics showing UK social mobility is lower than in most other developed countries.

    This article appeared in The Financial Times on June 26, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
    Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

    Related links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Paul Gregg webpage
    Steve Machin webpage
    Alissa Goodman webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Tuesday 26 June 2007

    The Financial Times: Adonis wants to raise GCSE top grades target to 80 per cent

    Lord Adonis' call for an ‘80 per cent education system’ came the day after the Sutton Trust education think-tank revealed preliminary research from the London School of Economics showing UK social mobility is lower than in most other developed countries.

    This article appeared in The Financial Times on June 26, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
    Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

    Related links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Paul Gregg webpage
    Steve Machin webpage
    Alissa Goodman webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Monday 25 June 2007

    The Financial Times: UK productivity still trails competitors

    Gordon Brown’s ambition of matching the growth in productivity of the world’s big economies appears as elusive as ever after research, by the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE published on Monday said there was ‘still a major productivity challenge’.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on June 25, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
    Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.788, April 2007
    Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

    Related links
    Raffaella Sadun webpage
    Nick Bloom webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage

    Friday 15 June 2007

    The Trumpet: Schools flunk dropout test

    The education system in Britain is failing. The London School of Economics labels the 1 million unemployed, non-student young people in Britain a “lost generation” that is proportionally twice the size of those in Germany and France.

    This article appeared in The Trumpet on June 15, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
    Details

    Related links
    Sandra McNally webpage
    Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage


    Wednesday 13 June 2007

    Daily Mail: Labour is failing

    The government is failing to capitalise on economic growth because of tax hikes and rising inequality. Britons take prosperity for granted and are focusing on the Government's failure to turn higher taxes into public service improvements, said John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics.

    This article appeared in the Daily Mail on June 13, 2007
    Source: Lexis Nexis. No link to article.

    Related Publications
    CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
    Blair's Economic Legacy. 'In brief' article by John Van Reenen

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage

    Tuesday 08 May 2007

    Channel 4 - News: FactCheck: Labour's election pledge cards

    John Van Reenen has estimated that the 'value added' by the New Deal programme amounts to around 17000 extra young people in work per year.

    This broadcast was made on Channel 4 News on May 8, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Sunday 01 April 2007

    The Toronto Star: Don't worry, be happy...or not?

    An explosion in happiness research has consistently shown for some time now that the link between rising income and rising well-being has broken down. Leading British economist Richard Layard is among a fast-proliferating group of economists paying attention to this paradox at the centre of modern society.

    This article appeared in The Toronto Star (Canada) on April 1, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details
    The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard Details

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
    The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
    Happiness Research webpage

    Further press cuttings
    The Sunday Telegraph - April 1, 2007
    The real business
    Some 15 per cent of the British population suffers from depression, and recent research from the London School of Economics says that this costs the economy more than pounds 17bn a year. Aim-listed Ultrasis hopes its Beating the Blues software will address this market and reward its 12,000 retail shareholders.

    Sunday 25 March 2007

    The Observer: Larger questions of urban sprawl

    Research by economists [from the Centre for Economic Performance and University of Toronto] says sprawling neighbourhoods don't make people fat - they attract fat people.

    This article appeared in The Observer on March 25, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    'Fat City: The Relationship Between Urban Sprawl and Obesity' by Jean Eid, Henry G. Overman, Diego Puga and Matthew Turner, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.758, November 2006.
    Urban Sprawl, article by Henry G. Overman in CentrePiece Vol.11, Issue 1, Summer 2006

    Related Links
    Henry G Overman webpage
    Diego Puga webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Thursday 22 March 2007

    AlterNet - San Francisco, CA: Why having more no longer makes us happy

    In the words of the economist Richard Layard, "We now know that what people say about how they feel corresponds closely to the actual levels of activity in different parts of the brain, which can be measured in standard scientific ways."

    This article appeared in AlterNet - San Francisco, CA on March 22, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
    Details

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Happiness Research webpage
    Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

    Thursday 22 March 2007

    AlterNet - San Francisco, CA: Why having more no longer makes us happy

    In the words of the economist Richard Layard, "We now know that what people say about how they feel corresponds closely to the actual levels of activity in different parts of the brain, which can be measured in standard scientific ways."

    This article appeared in AlterNet - San Francisco, CA on March 22, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
    Details

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Happiness Research webpage
    Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

    Friday 16 March 2007

    Christian Today: Faith schools better when competitive, research suggests

    Research suggests that faith schools that operate their own admissions get better results when they have competition. Using a sample of 200,000 pupils in England, an institute at the London School of Economics (LSE) has published a study of school choice, the BBC reports. Faith schools - outside local authority control - were compared with community schools to measure the impact of parental choice. Researchers say when a faith school has no competition, its results are lower.

    This article appeared in Christian Today on March 16, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publication
    The Educational Impact of Parental Choice and School Competition by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva published in CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07

    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Olmo Silva webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Wednesday 14 March 2007

    Life Style Extra - UK: Small carbon tax could double environment budget

    In his study published in his Centre's journal CentrePiece, Dr Ralf Martin, of the Centre for Economic Performance, shows how a small carbon tax on US car owners could double world public spending on research into tackling global warming.

    This article appeared in Life Style Extra - UK on March 14, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Technologies to Tackle Global Warming by Ralf Martin in CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07
    Climate Change: Economic Sense and Non-sense of Carbon Mitigation Policies by Ralf Martin. CEP Policy Analysis published in 2006.

    Related links
    Ralf Martin webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage

    Thursday 22 February 2007

    The Guardian: Wellbeing is not about the individual - it's about relationships

    While starting from urgent and appropriate concerns, both Oliver James and Richard Layard, cited by Madeleine Bunting as key players in the "politics of wellbeing", risk promoting the very individualism they identify as being the cause of 'social recession'.

    This article appeared in The Guardian on February 22, 2007
    Link to article

    For a full list of articles in the Guardian's Comment Is Free Politics of Wellbeing debate, click here

    Related publication
    The Depression Report by Richard Layard

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
    The Mental Health Policy Group webpage

    For a full list of articles in the Politics of Wellbeing debate click here



    Tuesday 20 February 2007

    La Tribune: Comment certains pays ont réduit le chômage demasse

    An article by Richard Layard discussing unemployment was published in the French business newspaper La Tribune.

    This article appeared in the French newspaper La Tribune
    [No direct link to article available.]

    Related Publications
    Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman. New edition published by Oxford University Press, January 2005.
    Details

    ‘Full Employment for Europe’ by Richard Layard. Chapter in Global Competitiveness Report 2005-2006 Policies Underpinning Rising Prosperity by Augusto Lopez-Claros, Michael E. Porter and Klaus Schwab. Palgrave McMillan. September 2005.
    Details

    Related link
    Richard Layard webpage
    Stephen Nickell webpage
    Richard Jackman webpage

    Friday 16 February 2007

    The Guardian: It's a mad world

    Richard Layard's Happiness Forum meetings and his research into 'wellbeing' featured in the column by Oliver James.

    This article appeared in The Guardian on February 16, 2007
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    The Depression Report by Richard Layard
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
    Happiness Research webpage
    The Mental Health Policy Group webpage

    Monday 29 January 2007

    News-Medical.net: Money cannot buy you happiness

    "For example, as Professor Richard Layard of the LSE emphasises, improving health, particularly mental health, would be an effective way of making people ...
    This artical featured in News-Medical.net on 29 January, 2007. Link to article

    Related Links
    The Depression Report Click to download
    Richard Layard's webpage
    Mental Health Policy Group webpage
    Wellbeing Research Programme webpage



    Wednesday 17 January 2007

    Yahoo News USA: National Stock Exchange Names Andrew B. Bernard and Dennis C. Cuneo to Board of Directors

    Lists affiliations of Andrew B. Bernard – including that he is a Research Associate of CEP.

    This article appeared in Yahoo News USA on January 17, 2007
    Link to article.
    Original press release from the National Stock Exchange Inc

    Related Links
    Andrew B. Bernard is an Associate of the Globalisation research programme at CEP.
    Globalisation research programme webpage
    For a list of CEP Discussion Papers Andrew Bernard has co-authored go to: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/author.asp?author=bernard

    Thursday 04 January 2007

    The Economist: Stub it out

    Article mentions new research on the effects of the smoking ban in Scotland, co-authored by Steve Machin.

    This article appeared in the Economist online on January 4, 2007
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    ‘Short-Run Economic Effects of the Scottish Smoking Ban’, by J. Adda, S. Berlinski and S. Machin, International Journal of Epidemiology, December 2006. Link to abstract

    Related Links
    Stephen Machin's webpage

    Thursday 04 January 2007

    The Economist: Stub it out

    Article mentions new research on the effects of the smoking ban in Scotland, co-authored by Steve Machin.

    This article appeared in the Economist online on January 4, 2007
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    ‘Short-Run Economic Effects of the Scottish Smoking Ban’, by J. Adda, S. Berlinski and S. Machin, International Journal of Epidemiology, December 2006. Link to abstract

    Related Links
    Stephen Machin's webpage

    Thursday 04 January 2007

    The Economist: Stub it out

    Article mentions new research on the effects of the smoking ban in Scotland, co-authored by Steve Machin.

    This article appeared in the Economist online on January 4, 2007
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    ‘Short-Run Economic Effects of the Scottish Smoking Ban’, by J. Adda, S. Berlinski and S. Machin, International Journal of Epidemiology, December 2006. Link to abstract

    Related Links
    Stephen Machin's webpage

    Thursday 04 January 2007

    The Economist: Stub it out

    Article mentions new research on the effects of the smoking ban in Scotland, co-authored by Steve Machin.

    This article appeared in the Economist online on January 4, 2007
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    ‘Short-Run Economic Effects of the Scottish Smoking Ban’, by J. Adda, S. Berlinski and S. Machin, International Journal of Epidemiology, December 2006. Link to abstract

    Related Links
    Stephen Machin's webpage

    Sunday 31 December 2006

    The Sunday Times: We're only happy in our own little world. That's dangerous

    In a general discussion about ‘happiness’ – the individual’s and society’s – columnist remarks that happiness theory such as Richard Layard’s is a current craze.

    This article appeared in the Times Online on December 31, 2006
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Happiness - Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Buy it online

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
    The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage


    Wednesday 20 December 2006

    The Guardian: Ministers deny it but the truth is out there

    The government appears to have backed Richard Layard’s recommendations for increases in therapy provision to tackle depression – overall funding has increased over the past decade although from a very low base. In fact mental health services have been disproportionately affected by cuts in 2006.

    This article appeared in The Guardian on December 20, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
    The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

    Tuesday 19 December 2006

    The Daily Mail: Depression: the great happy pill betrayal

    Research has shown that talking therapies work just as well as antidepressant drugs in the short term, but in the long term they are more effective at preventing relapse. However, a Mail investigation has found these guidelines are being consistently ignored, because talking therapies are not funded across the NHS. Richard Layard argues for a commitment from the government to fund the training of 10,000 extra therapists across the UK.

    This article appeared in The Daily Mail on December 19, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
    The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

    Friday 15 December 2006

    Strategy + Business: The productivity riddle

    An article by Glen Hubbard discussing productivity in which he cites research by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen.
    '...in a knowledge-intensive economy, the firms with better practices for process techniques, goal setting, performance evaluation, and human resources management should be found, by reasonably objective observers, to exhibit generally better performance. And indeed that correlation was found in recent research by economists Nick Bloom of Stanford University and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics....'

    This article appeared in the Strategy + Business - magazine on December 15, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

    Related Links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

    Friday 08 December 2006

    The Daily Mail: Faith school education is no better than others

    Faith primary schools make little difference to children's future prospects, government-funded research by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva of the Centre for Economic Performance shows.

    This article appeared in the The Daily Mail on December 8, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

    Related Links
    Stephen Gibbon webpage
    Olmo Silva webpage
    Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

    Wednesday 06 December 2006

    Bloomberg Radio: Bloomberg on the economy

    John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance interviewed on Bloomberg Radio's 'Bloomberg on the Economy' programme.

    Radio programme broadcast on December 6, 2006
    Link to bloomberg radio website for archive programmes

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage

    Wednesday 06 December 2006

    Bloomberg Radio: Bloomberg on the economy

    John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance interviewed on Bloomberg Radio's 'Bloomberg on the Economy' programme.

    Radio programme broadcast on December 6, 2006
    Link to bloomberg radio website for archive programmes

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage

    Wednesday 06 December 2006

    Bloomberg Radio: Bloomberg on the economy

    John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance interviewed on Bloomberg Radio's 'Bloomberg on the Economy' programme.

    Radio programme broadcast on December 6, 2006
    Link to bloomberg radio website for archive programmes

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage

    Wednesday 06 December 2006

    Bloomberg Radio: Bloomberg on the economy

    John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance interviewed on Bloomberg Radio's 'Bloomberg on the Economy' programme.

    Radio programme broadcast on December 6, 2006
    Link to bloomberg radio website for archive programmes

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage

    Wednesday 08 November 2006

    Government News Network - GNN: Commission on Environmental Markets and Economic Performance announced

    Environment Secretary David Miliband and Trade and Industry Secretary Alistair Darling will jointly chair a Commission on Environmental Markets and Economic Performance. Members of the Commission will be drawn from business, NGO's, academia, trade unions and public sector organisations. Professor John Van Reenen is amongst those who have provisionally agreed to sit on the commission.

    This article appeared in the Government News Network on 8 November 2006
    Link to article.

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen's webpage
    DTI Environmental Industries Unit webpage
    DEFRA website

    Wednesday 11 October 2006

    The Independent: 'Revolutionary' economist wins Nobel Prize

    Article about US economist Edmund Phelps who has won a Nobel Prize, officially called the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences. Includes quote from Professor Christopher Pissarides, of the Centre for Economic Performance: ‘The prize was richly deserved and long overdue. He revolutionised our way of thinking about the inflation-unemployment trade-off, which has influenced policymakers since the 1960s.’

    This article appeared in the Times Online on July 22, 2005
    Link to article.

    Tuesday 10 October 2006

    In The News: US putting EU economy into touch

    The US economy is continuing to outperform and outstrip its EU counterpart, a new report claims, despite a concerted innovation drive from the latter. Today's study from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), part of LSE, says that US productivity in terms of GDP per hour is 15 per cent higher than in the EU. When translated into GDP per capita, the US economy is about a third more productive than that of the European member states

    This article appeared in InTheNews online on 10 October 2006
    Link to article.

    Related Links
    CEP Policy Analysis pageThe Lisbon Agenda

    Saturday 16 September 2006

    Sydney Morning Herald: Going into therapy

    Cognitive behaviour therapy has a high success rate among people suffering depression and anxiety. It can make them feel happier. The positive findings have prompted an eminent British economist, and happiness guru, Professor Lord Richard Layard, to argue in favour of training thousands of therapists in the technique.

    This article appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald on September 16, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard
    Link

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    The Mental Health Policy Group programme overview
    The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

    Saturday 16 September 2006

    Sydney Morning Herald: Going into therapy

    Cognitive behaviour therapy has a high success rate among people suffering depression and anxiety. It can make them feel happier. The positive findings have prompted an eminent British economist, and happiness guru, Professor Lord Richard Layard, to argue in favour of training thousands of therapists in the technique.

    This article appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald on September 16, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard
    Link

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    The Mental Health Policy Group programme overview
    The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

    Saturday 16 September 2006

    Sydney Morning Herald: Going into therapy

    Cognitive behaviour therapy has a high success rate among people suffering depression and anxiety. It can make them feel happier. The positive findings have prompted an eminent British economist, and happiness guru, Professor Lord Richard Layard, to argue in favour of training thousands of therapists in the technique.

    This article appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald on September 16, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard
    Link

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    The Mental Health Policy Group programme overview
    The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

    Monday 04 September 2006

    The Independent: Leading article: Listen to Lord Layard

    Back in June Professor Lord Layard published research to show that only a quarter of those who suffer from mental illness, in terms of anxiety and depression, are getting proper treatment.

    This article appeared in The Independent on September 4, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard
    Link

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    The Mental Health Policy Group programme overview
    The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

    Further press cuttings
    The Independent on September 4, 2006
    Claire Rayner: John Hogan. How could he?
    Easily enough. The father, whose leap from a balcony killed his son, suffers from clinical depression. Don't condemn him.
    It is great to hear that Lord Layard, the "happiness tsar", and the Government are to spend a little more money on those suffering from depression...


    Monday 04 September 2006

    The Independent: Leading article: Listen to Lord Layard

    Back in June Professor Lord Layard published research to show that only a quarter of those who suffer from mental illness, in terms of anxiety and depression, are getting proper treatment.

    This article appeared in The Independent on September 4, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard
    Link

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    The Mental Health Policy Group programme overview
    The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

    Further press cuttings
    The Independent on September 4, 2006
    Claire Rayner: John Hogan. How could he?
    Easily enough. The father, whose leap from a balcony killed his son, suffers from clinical depression. Don't condemn him.
    It is great to hear that Lord Layard, the "happiness tsar", and the Government are to spend a little more money on those suffering from depression...


    Saturday 19 August 2006

    Charlotte Observer (N Carolina): Why aren't we happier?

    We have more money and more stuff; now we just want more joy
    Though the US has had increasing prosperity and economic security there has been no corresponding increase in contentment. This happiness flatline, prominent British economist Richard Layard calls a "plateau of happiness," a disconnect between what we have and how we feel. Layard's critically acclaimed book, "Happiness: Lessons from a New Science," was recently published in paperback.

    This article appeared in the Charlotte Observer, N. Carolina news online on August 19, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    Happiness research webpage

    Wednesday 09 August 2006

    The Guardian: The radar is blinking but who's watching?

    The government is still backing Lord [Richard] Layard's recommendations for 10,000 new NHS therapists to tackle depression and anxiety.

    This article appeared in the Guardian on August 9, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    The Depression Report - A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
    The Mental Health Group programme overview

    Saturday 05 August 2006

    Financial Express: Happiness indices must be discounted

    While Richard Layard of LSE has started the debate around dynamics of happiness and its place in public policy in recent years, Bentham and other utilitarians of the 19th century have indeed laid the foundations.

    This article appeared in the Financial Express online on August 5, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    Happiness Research

    Friday 28 July 2006

    The Wall Street Journal: Why executives speak out

    The columnist refers to a letter in which he is directed to look at work the LSE has done in evaluating happiness. Richard Layard, an LSE expert on happiness ponders what happiness is anyway, channelling evidence from neuroscience, psychology and surveys.

    This article appeared in the Wall Street Journal on July 28, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
    Details

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    The Happiness Research Programme webpage

    Further press cuttings
    July 28, 2006
    Seychelles Nation
    Happy Planet Index (HPI) -Islands are homes of happy people
    The Seychellois are the second happiest people in Africa after Sao Tome and Principe, another island nation, according to the Happy Planet Index (HPI) designed by the British think tank New Economics Foundation (NEF). Richard Layard, director of the Well-Being Programme at LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, said that the index was an interesting way to tackle the issue of modern life’s environmental impact. ‘It reminds us that it is not good enough to be happy today if we are impoverishing future generations through global warming. Over the last 50 years, living standards in the West have improved enormously but we have become no happier’.

    Friday 28 July 2006

    BBC News: Why lesbians may enjoy better wages

    Authoritative new research highlights a "gay pay effect", which means that lesbians can earn 35% more than comparable straight women.

    This article appeared in the BBC News on July 28, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
    CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

    Related Links
    Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
    Alan Marin's webpage
    Jonathan Wadworth's webpage

    Further press cuttings:
    BBC, Business, July 28, 2006
    Lesbians 'earn bigger salaries'
    Lesbians in couples earn more than heterosexual women in relationships - but for gay men the opposite is true, findings indicate. Academic research says gay women in couples earn 35% more than their straight counterparts.

    Friday 28 July 2006

    BBC News: Why lesbians may enjoy better wages

    Authoritative new research highlights a "gay pay effect", which means that lesbians can earn 35% more than comparable straight women.

    This article appeared in the BBC News on July 28, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
    CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

    Related Links
    Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
    Alan Marin's webpage
    Jonathan Wadworth's webpage

    Further press cuttings:
    BBC, Business, July 28, 2006
    Lesbians 'earn bigger salaries'
    Lesbians in couples earn more than heterosexual women in relationships - but for gay men the opposite is true, findings indicate. Academic research says gay women in couples earn 35% more than their straight counterparts.

    Thursday 27 July 2006

    The Times: Be afraid of the happy brigade

    The author of the article refers to Professor Richard Layard’s theories about how people can become happier: ‘Consider just three findings from the ‘new science of happiness’ as Richard Layard, the economist and Labour peer, describes it. Above about £15,000, increasing your income adds little to your happiness. Believing in God makes you happy. Getting divorced makes you unhappy. These facts explain why Westerners are no happier now than 50 years ago; our increased wealth has been accompanied by more divorce and less belief in God.’

    This article appeared in the Times on July 27, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
    Details

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    The Happiness Research Programme webpage

    Thursday 27 July 2006

    The Times: Be afraid of the happy brigade

    The author of the article refers to Professor Richard Layard’s theories about how people can become happier: ‘Consider just three findings from the ‘new science of happiness’ as Richard Layard, the economist and Labour peer, describes it. Above about £15,000, increasing your income adds little to your happiness. Believing in God makes you happy. Getting divorced makes you unhappy. These facts explain why Westerners are no happier now than 50 years ago; our increased wealth has been accompanied by more divorce and less belief in God.’

    This article appeared in the Times on July 27, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
    Details

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    The Happiness Research Programme webpage

    Wednesday 12 July 2006

    The Times: If I were Richard Layard, I'd be happy to be the happiness czar, says Sholto Byrnes

    If I were Richard Layard, I'd be happy to be the happiness czar, comments Sholto Byrnes.

    This article appeared in the Times on July 12, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

    Related Links
    Richard Layard's webpage
    The Happiness Research Programme webpage
    The Mental Health Group website

    Further media item:
    Saturday 8 July
    ABC Radio (US)
    Richard Layard gave an interview relayed across the US discussing how money cannot buy happiness.
    [No link]

    Tuesday 20 June 2006

    The Financial Times: Searching for a cure for google envy

    Research by the Centre for Economic Performance suggests that British groups have benefited greatly from US R&D spending simply by placing offices in Silicon Valley and paying attention to what is going on.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on June 20, 2006
    [No link available]

    Related Publications
    How Special is the Special Relationship? Using the Impact of R&D Spillovers on UK Firms as a Test of Technology Sourcing, by Rachel Griffith, Rupert Harrison and John Van Reenen. CEP Discussion Paper No.659, November 2004

    Further information
    Rachel Griffith is a Deputy Director at the Institute for Fiscal Studies
    Rupert Harrison is a Research Economist at the Institute for Fiscal Studies and University College London
    John Van Reenen's CEP webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

    Tuesday 13 June 2006

    LaVoce: Una gerontocrazia solo presunta

    A joint article by Raffaella Sadun and Andrea Prat (Sticerd) in the Italian online economics newspaper talking about the demographic differences between US and Italian top managers.

    This article appeared in LaVoce online on June 13, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Raffaella Sadun's webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

    Tuesday 13 June 2006

    LaVoce: Una gerontocrazia solo presunta

    A joint article by Raffaella Sadun and Andrea Prat (Sticerd) in the Italian online economics newspaper talking about the demographic differences between US and Italian top managers.

    This article appeared in LaVoce online on June 13, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Links
    Raffaella Sadun's webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

    Sunday 19 March 2006

    The Independent: The dangers of keeping it in the family when choosing personnel management

    Research carried out by the Centre for Economic Performance and McKinsey & Co, the management consultancy, suggests that the productivity gap between Britain and the rest of the world is largely due to the high proportion of family businesses in the UK and the fact that many of them are badly run.

    This article appeared in The Independent on March 19, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    CEP Policy Analysis, Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK’s Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom
    Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

    Related Links
    Nick Bloom’s webpage
    John Van Reenen's webpage
    CEP’s Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

    Wednesday 15 March 2006

    The Financial Times: Family-run businesses 'perform poorly'

    Research by the Centre for Economic Performance and the McKinsey group has found that objective assessments of managerial performance are important in explaining why UK companies tend to have lower productivity and profitability.

    This article appeared in The Financial Times on March 15, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    CEP Policy Analysis, Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK’s Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom
    Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

    Related Links: Nick Bloom’s webpage
    John Van Reenen's webpage
    CEP’s Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

    Letters to the FT in response to CEP research results
    Increase family directors' degree of accountability
    Letter in response to research by the Centre for Economics Performance at LSE in "Family-run businesses perform poorly".
    What matters is how the family business is handed on
    Five years of research... (No direct link.)
    “Sir, Five years of research by the Centre for Economics Performance at the London School of Economics and McKinsey is an expensive way to say "clogs to clogs in three generations.”

    Wednesday 15 March 2006

    The Financial Times: Family-run businesses 'perform poorly'

    Research by the Centre for Economic Performance and the McKinsey group has found that objective assessments of managerial performance are important in explaining why UK companies tend to have lower productivity and profitability.

    This article appeared in The Financial Times on March 15, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    CEP Policy Analysis, Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK’s Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom
    Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

    Related Links: Nick Bloom’s webpage
    John Van Reenen's webpage
    CEP’s Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

    Letters to the FT in response to CEP research results
    Increase family directors' degree of accountability
    Letter in response to research by the Centre for Economics Performance at LSE in "Family-run businesses perform poorly".
    What matters is how the family business is handed on
    Five years of research... (No direct link.)
    “Sir, Five years of research by the Centre for Economics Performance at the London School of Economics and McKinsey is an expensive way to say "clogs to clogs in three generations.”

    Monday 27 February 2006

    The New Yorker: Pursuing Happiness

    Two scholars explore the fragility of contentment. Richard Layard's book Happiness: Lessons from a new Science quoted.

    This article appeared in The New Yorker on February 27, 2006 Link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.

    Related Links
    Happiness Research webpage
    Richard Layard's webpage

    Tuesday 10 January 2006

    BBC News: 'Bigger the Better' for Workers

    Large well-managed companies with a wide global reach provide a happier work-life balance for their employees, a study by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen at the Centre for Economic Performance has suggested.

    This article appeared on the BBC News online on 10 January, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

    Related Links
    The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.

    Tuesday 10 January 2006

    BBC News: 'Bigger the Better' for Workers

    Large well-managed companies with a wide global reach provide a happier work-life balance for their employees, a study by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen at the Centre for Economic Performance has suggested.

    This article appeared on the BBC News online on 10 January, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

    Related Links
    The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.

    Tuesday 10 January 2006

    The Financial Times: Work-life balance called into question

    Providing employees with a good work-life balance does not lead to higher productivity, according to research published today. The study by three academics at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics finds that the evidence for "the win-win view, espoused by the government, that better work-life balance will improve productivity is rejected" and that "there is no relationship between productivity and work-life balance once good management is accounted for".

    This article appeared in The Financial Times on January 10, 2006
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

    Related Links
    The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.

    Monday 09 January 2006

    Release: Work-life balance: new research evidence on the links with management practices and productivity

    Companies that are bigger, more globalised and better managed provide a better work-life balance for their employees, according to new research Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Tobias Kretschmer and John Van Reenen.

    What’s more, tough product market competition improves management practices but without any detrimental impact on work-life balance. At the same time, the researchers find no evidence that firms with good practices on work-life balance – shorter hours, flexible working, family-friendly policies, etc. – have higher productivity.

    The study uses an innovative survey tool on over 700 manufacturing firms in France, Germany, the UK and the United States to ask questions about management practices and work-life balance. It finds that:

    • Well-managed firms do not work ‘harder’ but ‘smarter’ – employees in well-run firms typically have a better work-life balance.

    • In particular, management practices associated with good ‘people management’ – such as fostering talent, rewarding and retaining well performing staff and consistent training opportunities – are likely to be found in conjunction with good work-life balance practices – family-friendly policies, flexible working, shorter hours, more holidays, childcare subsidies, etc.

    • In well-managed firms, the hours worked by both managerial and non-managerial staff are not significantly higher than those in badly run firms. This again confirms the finding that working smarter not harder is the key determinant to successful management.

    • The share of women in management relative to non-management is significantly higher in firms with better work-life balance. In other words, the ‘glass ceiling’ does not seem to exist nearly as strongly in firms that treat their employees well.

    The researchers describe two opposing views on the effects and efficacy of good practices on work-life balance – the pessimistic ‘Chirac’ view and the optimistic ‘win-win’ view:

    • The view associated with the French president is that ‘Anglo-Saxon neo-liberalism’, encapsulated by tougher product market competition and globalisation has undesirable consequences. Although these forces raise productivity, they come at the expense of misery for workers in the form of long hours, job insecurity and intense and unsatisfying work.

    • The win-win view (espoused by the present UK government) argues that better work-life balance will improve productivity and employers are mistakenly failing to treat their workers as assets and implement better work-life balance practices.

    This study finds evidence for a hybrid view between these two polar extremes:

    • The evidence does not support the Chirac view: there is, in fact, a positive association between management and work-life balance. Similarly, the view that competition and globalisation are bad for work-life balance is not supported: there is no relationship between tougher competition and work-life balance. And larger firms – which are typically more globalised – also have better work-life balance practices.

    • But the win-win view that better work-life balance will improve productivity is also rejected: there is no relationship between productivity and work-life balance once good management is accounted for.

    • Instead, well-managed firms can choose to introduce better work-life balance practices or not. If they do introduce them, this neither penalises them in terms of productivity nor does it significantly reward them.

    Dr Nick Bloom comments:

    ‘Based on these results, it simply is not true that globalisation is such a disaster for employees. Employees in larger, more globalised firms seem to be much better off in terms of their working lives than those in smaller, more national firms.’

    ‘This conclusion suggests that improving work-life balance is socially desirable – workers obviously like it and firm productivity does not suffer. For firms, this will be worth weighing up more seriously. Most of the best-run firms in our sample treated their employees very well.’

    Professor John Van Reenen adds:

    ‘But we also need to be cautious before inferring that the results give a carte blanche for governments to regulate for better work-life balance.’

    ’Good work-life balance seems to be something that well-run firms in competitive markets do naturally. They need to treat their employees well to keep them – if not, their competitors will hire them away. Government policies on work-life balance should take this into account.’

    Further information
    ‘Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity’ by Nick Bloom, Tobias Kretschmer and John Van Reenen is published on Tuesday 10 January by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP).

    The research will be presented for the first time at a public meeting – Work-life Balance and Productivity – Trade-off or Complementarity? – at the London School of Economics, Old Building, Houghton Street, WC2A 2AE at 6pm on Tuesday 10 January. [ More]

    Speakers: John Dowdy, partner, McKinsey & Co; Sarah Jackson, chief executive, Working Families; Julie Mellor, partner, PricewaterhouseCoopers and former head of the Equal Opportunities Commission; John Van Reenen, director, CEP.

    Chair: Stephanie Flanders, economics editor, BBC Newsnight.

    The research is financially supported by the Anglo-German Foundation, the Economic and Social Research Council and the Advanced Institute for Management Research.

    For further information: contact Nick Bloom on 07775-862671, 0207-955-7286 or 0207-955-7284 (emails: n.bloom@lse.ac.uk; t.kretschmer@lse.ac.uk; j.vanreenen@lse.ac.uk).

    Monday 09 January 2006

    Release: Work-life balance: new research evidence on the links with management practices and productivity

    Companies that are bigger, more globalised and better managed provide a better work-life balance for their employees, according to new research Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Tobias Kretschmer and John Van Reenen.

    What’s more, tough product market competition improves management practices but without any detrimental impact on work-life balance. At the same time, the researchers find no evidence that firms with good practices on work-life balance – shorter hours, flexible working, family-friendly policies, etc. – have higher productivity.

    The study uses an innovative survey tool on over 700 manufacturing firms in France, Germany, the UK and the United States to ask questions about management practices and work-life balance. It finds that:

    • Well-managed firms do not work ‘harder’ but ‘smarter’ – employees in well-run firms typically have a better work-life balance.

    • In particular, management practices associated with good ‘people management’ – such as fostering talent, rewarding and retaining well performing staff and consistent training opportunities – are likely to be found in conjunction with good work-life balance practices – family-friendly policies, flexible working, shorter hours, more holidays, childcare subsidies, etc.

    • In well-managed firms, the hours worked by both managerial and non-managerial staff are not significantly higher than those in badly run firms. This again confirms the finding that working smarter not harder is the key determinant to successful management.

    • The share of women in management relative to non-management is significantly higher in firms with better work-life balance. In other words, the ‘glass ceiling’ does not seem to exist nearly as strongly in firms that treat their employees well.

    The researchers describe two opposing views on the effects and efficacy of good practices on work-life balance – the pessimistic ‘Chirac’ view and the optimistic ‘win-win’ view:

    • The view associated with the French president is that ‘Anglo-Saxon neo-liberalism’, encapsulated by tougher product market competition and globalisation has undesirable consequences. Although these forces raise productivity, they come at the expense of misery for workers in the form of long hours, job insecurity and intense and unsatisfying work.

    • The win-win view (espoused by the present UK government) argues that better work-life balance will improve productivity and employers are mistakenly failing to treat their workers as assets and implement better work-life balance practices.

    This study finds evidence for a hybrid view between these two polar extremes:

    • The evidence does not support the Chirac view: there is, in fact, a positive association between management and work-life balance. Similarly, the view that competition and globalisation are bad for work-life balance is not supported: there is no relationship between tougher competition and work-life balance. And larger firms – which are typically more globalised – also have better work-life balance practices.

    • But the win-win view that better work-life balance will improve productivity is also rejected: there is no relationship between productivity and work-life balance once good management is accounted for.

    • Instead, well-managed firms can choose to introduce better work-life balance practices or not. If they do introduce them, this neither penalises them in terms of productivity nor does it significantly reward them.

    Dr Nick Bloom comments:

    ‘Based on these results, it simply is not true that globalisation is such a disaster for employees. Employees in larger, more globalised firms seem to be much better off in terms of their working lives than those in smaller, more national firms.’

    ‘This conclusion suggests that improving work-life balance is socially desirable – workers obviously like it and firm productivity does not suffer. For firms, this will be worth weighing up more seriously. Most of the best-run firms in our sample treated their employees very well.’

    Professor John Van Reenen adds:

    ‘But we also need to be cautious before inferring that the results give a carte blanche for governments to regulate for better work-life balance.’

    ’Good work-life balance seems to be something that well-run firms in competitive markets do naturally. They need to treat their employees well to keep them – if not, their competitors will hire them away. Government policies on work-life balance should take this into account.’

    Further information
    ‘Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity’ by Nick Bloom, Tobias Kretschmer and John Van Reenen is published on Tuesday 10 January by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP).

    The research will be presented for the first time at a public meeting – Work-life Balance and Productivity – Trade-off or Complementarity? – at the London School of Economics, Old Building, Houghton Street, WC2A 2AE at 6pm on Tuesday 10 January. [ More]

    Speakers: John Dowdy, partner, McKinsey & Co; Sarah Jackson, chief executive, Working Families; Julie Mellor, partner, PricewaterhouseCoopers and former head of the Equal Opportunities Commission; John Van Reenen, director, CEP.

    Chair: Stephanie Flanders, economics editor, BBC Newsnight.

    The research is financially supported by the Anglo-German Foundation, the Economic and Social Research Council and the Advanced Institute for Management Research.

    For further information: contact Nick Bloom on 07775-862671, 0207-955-7286 or 0207-955-7284 (emails: n.bloom@lse.ac.uk; t.kretschmer@lse.ac.uk; j.vanreenen@lse.ac.uk).

    Monday 10 October 2005

    The Financial Times: It's the way you do it

    Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen of CEP suggest that the greater use of information technology by US subsidiaries and a higher return from their IT investment attribute to the difference in output of US-owned plants in Britain and British-owned ones: output per hour in US-owned plants was almost 40 per cent higher than in British-owned plants.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 10 October, 2005
    Link to article

    Related Publication
    It's not what you do, it's the way that you do I.T. - testing explanations of productivity growth using U.S. affiliates

    Related Links
    Productivity and Innovation Research Programme

    Also mentioned in EGovMonitor.com, PublicTechnology.net, Tenders Direct, FinFacts Business News, What PC, El Pais, and Silicon.com



    Sunday 02 October 2005

    The Sunday Times: Technology kicks away the career ladder

    Today's aspiring CEOs are finding it much harder to work their way up from the bottom than the generation before - poor children born in the 1970s were 30% less likely to improve their position in society than those born in the 1950s, according to research by Jo Blanden, Paul Greggand Steve Machin.

    This article appeared in the Sunday Times Online on October 3, 2005
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, June 2002, Paper No' CEEDP0026
    Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
    Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling


    Wednesday 14 September 2005

    The Guardian: 'Mental illness is now our biggest social problem'

    Richard Layard argues that while unemployment was a national disgrace, and still has not gone fully away, mental illness is now our biggest social problem - bigger than unemployment and bigger than poverty.

    "We need our politicians to see it that way, because that is how it seems to one third of all the families in the country."

    This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

    Related Links
    The Wellbeing research programme website.

    Wednesday 14 September 2005

    The Guardian: 'Mental illness is now our biggest social problem'

    Richard Layard argues that while unemployment was a national disgrace, and still has not gone fully away, mental illness is now our biggest social problem - bigger than unemployment and bigger than poverty.

    "We need our politicians to see it that way, because that is how it seems to one third of all the families in the country."

    This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

    Related Links
    The Wellbeing research programme website.

    Wednesday 14 September 2005

    The Guardian: 'Mental illness is now our biggest social problem'

    Richard Layard argues that while unemployment was a national disgrace, and still has not gone fully away, mental illness is now our biggest social problem - bigger than unemployment and bigger than poverty.

    "We need our politicians to see it that way, because that is how it seems to one third of all the families in the country."

    This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

    Related Links
    The Wellbeing research programme website.

    Wednesday 14 September 2005

    The Guardian: 'Mental illness is now our biggest social problem'

    Richard Layard argues that while unemployment was a national disgrace, and still has not gone fully away, mental illness is now our biggest social problem - bigger than unemployment and bigger than poverty.

    "We need our politicians to see it that way, because that is how it seems to one third of all the families in the country."

    This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

    Related Links
    The Wellbeing research programme website.

    Wednesday 14 September 2005

    The Guardian: 'Mental illness is now our biggest social problem'

    Richard Layard argues that while unemployment was a national disgrace, and still has not gone fully away, mental illness is now our biggest social problem - bigger than unemployment and bigger than poverty.

    "We need our politicians to see it that way, because that is how it seems to one third of all the families in the country."

    This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

    Related Links
    The Wellbeing research programme website.

    Tuesday 02 August 2005

    The Washington Post: Joy . . . or Pain?

    To Some Extent, How You Feel for the Rest of Your Life Is Under Your Control.

    Despite the constant promotion of products claimed to extend life and prolong vigor, nothing you can buy in a box, bottle or tube has been shown to extend anything other than your credit card balance.

    Some research suggests that happy people live longer. Even if you are not naturally optimistic or of a sunny disposition trying to focus on positive things can be beneficial.

    British economist Richard Layard, author of 'Happiness: Lessons from a New Science', agrees: Becoming happy and optimistic, he says, is essentially taking control of your emotions instead of letting them control you.

    This article appeared in the Washington Post on August 02, 2005
    Link to article. [Free, but registration required].

    Related Publications
    Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

    Related Links
    The Wellbeing research programme website.

    Saturday 23 July 2005

    International Herald Tribune: 2 Cents worth: Never too rich or too happy

    This article reports research into the state of happiness. Richard Layard, professor of economics at the LSE, said in a 2003 lecture at the school that GDP is an inaccurate measure of happiness.

    This article appeared in The International Herald Tribune
    on July 23, 2005.
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

    Sunday 17 July 2005

    The Times Online: Doctors' surgeries to offer jobs help

    According to a paper by Richard Layard of the London School of Economics fort the Downing Street strategy unit, more people receive incapacity benefits due to mental problems than unemployment benefits, and the cost of benefits for the mentally ill adds up to about £10 billion per year.

    This article appeared in The Times Online on July 17, 2005.
    Link to article

    Related links
    Professor Layard is Director of the Wellbeing Programme at CEP

    Tuesday 28 June 2005

    I.O.L.: New Study Highlights Trend of 'Mamma's Boys'

    News article discussing 'Why Do Most Italian Young Men Live with their Parents? Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure' by Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti

    This article appeared in the South African I.O.L Online on 28 June, 2005
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Paper No' CEPRDP05116, June 2005

    Previously published as CEP Discussion Paper No 536 in June 2002


    Tuesday 21 June 2005

    The Daily Mail: Mugging the middle classes

    Reference to research by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Steve Machin that reveals that the ending of educational selection has actually reduced opportunities for the poor and widened the class gulf. The LSE report shows conclusively that the 11-plus was an "escape route" and removing it has undermined social mobility.

    This article appeared in The Daily Mail
    on June 21, 2005.
    Link to article.

    Related Publications:
    'Social Mobility in Britain: low and falling'in CentrePiece Spring 2005

    Read the Report: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

    Monday 02 May 2005

    The Western Mail: Education, education, education - what rubbish!

    "According to research by the London School of Economics, Britain and the United States have the worst social inequality in a sample of eight rich nations."

    Letter published in The Western Mail, with reference to Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

    This Letter appeared in The Western Mail May 02, 2005.
    Link to letter.

    Read the Report: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

    Monday 02 May 2005

    The Western Mail: Education, education, education - what rubbish!

    "According to research by the London School of Economics, Britain and the United States have the worst social inequality in a sample of eight rich nations."

    Letter published in The Western Mail, with reference to Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

    This Letter appeared in The Western Mail May 02, 2005.
    Link to letter.

    Read the Report: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

    Monday 02 May 2005

    BBC News Online: Is increased choice any good?

    The issue of choice is now at the centre of the political debate, with Labour and Conservatives both proclaiming their commitment to increasing choice in health and education.

    Professor Steve Machin of the London School of Economics warns that there is relatively little evidence that competition improves performance in state education.

    This article appeared in BBC News Online May 02, 2005.
    Link to article.

    Monday 11 April 2005

    ESRC Tender: RLAB wins tender to run ESRC Review of International Data Resources and Needs.

    The Review of International Data Resources and Needs is a major, new ESRC project, the findings from which will form the basis for a range of potential new initiatives to support and encourage international and comparative research.

    The scope of the review is wide ranging, assessing the international data needs of the research community from all disciplines and institutions from academic bodies and government departments to charities and private consultancies.

    The 8 month project will focus upon the nature of the resources required to undertake international and comparative research, in terms of the resources currently available, the quality of such resources and their accessibility.

    Winning the tender for the review is a significant recognition of the very high level of international data expertise within the RLAB, its excellence in collaborative research and the quality of the joint research centres' overseas contacts.



    Thursday 17 March 2005

    The Independent: Education Quandary

    Are we losing sight of what schools are for? The Government tells them to teach children to be nice to each other. Professor Richard Layard, of the LSE, says they should teach children how to be happy. Is this just more mumbo-jumbo?

    Reference to the work of Professor Richard Layard, LSE, that despite growing prosperity, we are no happier than we were 50 years ago. He argues that schools have a role in building individual self-advancement at an early age in people.

    This article appeared in The Independent - Education section March 17, 2005.
    Link to article.

    Tuesday 08 March 2005

    Norfork Eastern Daily Press: So how happy are we really?

    Happiness, happiness, the greatest gift that I possess, sang Ken Dodd. And soon you will be able to go and find it. Forget having to go over the rainbow; by 2010 the Government will be able to tell you where the happy places are.

    A series of maps of England is to be produced - a so-called happiness index - telling you which areas enjoy the best quality of life, probably based on factors such as employment, marriage, commuting times, environmental quality and stress.

    With reference to Richard Layard's new book Happiness: Lessons from a new Science

    This article appeared in The Norfork Eastern Daily Press March 08, 2005.
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

    Tuesday 08 March 2005

    The Guardian: Blair''s Green antidote to beating the blues

    The Government's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is planning to compile a wellbeing index, which includes a number of factors other than income (neighbourhood, mental health, access to green areas etc.) A book recently published by LSE professor Richard Layard argues that we are no happier now than 50 years ago.

    This article appeared on The Guardian March 08, 2005.
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

    Saturday 05 March 2005

    The Financial Times: Joy divisions

    Review of the book by leading economist Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons on a new science on the relation between increasing wealth and decreasing happiness in the Western World. The article's author interviewed Mr Layard in his LSE office.

    This article appeared on The Financial Times March 05, 2005.
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

    Friday 25 February 2005

    Radio Free Europe: World: Signs Grow Of Dollar Losing Favor As World''s Reserve Currency

    Gianluca Benigno, LSE, states "The euro is an alternative reserve currency that the central banks are considering is becoming more liquid and important"

    This article appeared on the Radio Free Europe website, February 24, 2005.
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Gianluca Benigno and Pierpaolo Benigno, Designing Target Rules for International Monetary Policy Cooperation, Paper No' CEPDP0666, December 2004.

    Friday 25 February 2005

    Radio Free Europe: World: Signs Grow Of Dollar Losing Favor As World''s Reserve Currency

    Gianluca Benigno, LSE, states "The euro is an alternative reserve currency that the central banks are considering is becoming more liquid and important"

    This article appeared on the Radio Free Europe website, February 24, 2005.
    Link to article.

    Related Publications
    Gianluca Benigno and Pierpaolo Benigno, Designing Target Rules for International Monetary Policy Cooperation, Paper No' CEPDP0666, December 2004.

    Tuesday 11 January 2005

    The Times: Another revolution in teaching

    How do you keep hold of teachers once you've recruited them? With some difficulty, it would seem, as more than 40 per cent of teachers leaving the profession say that nothing could have made them stay, according to a report in CentrePiece (Autumn 2004). Even calculating the level of shortage is not straightforward, the magazine of the Centre for Economic Performance suggests. Demand for teachers has fluctuated considerably over the past 30 years and estimating the need for teachers is further complicated by the fact that teaching is an ageing profession: "Within the next ten years, nearly 50 per cent of the current workforce will have retired," the report authors note.

    Current financial administration arrangements for education also make the calculations difficult. Although the Government sets spending limits and determines pay, it does not have control over how many teachers individual education authorities employ.

    Despite "golden hellos" of £4,000 for new teachers in shortage subjects, retention in maths, English and modern languages is a problem because career options outside the profession offer better financial rewards. So assessing the flow of newly qualified teachers does not truly indicate the actual level of those available to teach.

    The quality of teaching staff is also a concern. Quite aside from debates regarding what kind of qualifications make someone a better teacher, the report suggests that "we need to be concerned about recruiting from the lower end of the ability distribution".

    Creating a pay package that would guarantee high-quality teachers remains a problem. The report notes, too, that performance-related pay schemes elsewhere in the world have not been entirely successful and have a limited role in motivating staff.

    This article appeared in The Times on January 11, 2005.
    Link to article

    Related Publications
    Arnaud Chevalier and Peter Dolton Teacher shortage: another impending crisis?, CentrePiece, Autumn 2004