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Friday 08 December 2017

BBC Radio Surrey (6:30:41 AM): CEP on Radio

… within the next half an hour Mole Valley and Drygate and Banstead among the areas which would be hit hardest by Brexit according to a report by researchers at the London School of Economics say both economies are expected to see a decline partly because of the jobs and businesses which are based there politicians and some business groups say they're sceptical of the report but the LSE says they believe it's an accurate estimate.


Related Links:
BBC Radio Surrey (6:30:41 AM) - CEP on Radio

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 06 December 2017

Gulf Times online: Premier faces growth Tory civil war over soft Brexit deal

A recent study by LSE said Brexit without a trade deal would cost London over £100bn over five years, while staying in the single market would reduce the losses to some £58bn.


Related Links:
Gulf Times online - Premier faces growth Tory civil war over soft Brexit deal

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 06 December 2017

Evening Standard (London): Now Tory civil war deepens over soft Brexit

Snippet:... A recent study by LSE said Brexit without a trade deal would cost London over £100 billion over five years, while staying in the single market would reduce the losses to some £58 billion


Related Links:
Evening Standard (London) - Now Tory civil war deepens over soft Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Sunday 03 December 2017

ITV television: Peston on Sunday

Our final #GeekoftheWeek goes to Henry Overman with his NIESR chart looking at the local economic impact of Brexit.


Related Links:
ITV television - Peston on Sunday

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 01 December 2017

The Street: Britain’s opposition leader says Labour Party a ‘threat’ to investment banks

The London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance and Centre for Cities estimates the British capital could lose as much as £18 billion in annual revenue and as many as 30,000 jobs, a figure that EY suggests could rise to 83,000 in a worst-case "Hard Brexit" scenario


Related Links:
The Street - Britain’s opposition leader says Labour Party a ‘threat’ to investment banks

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 01 December 2017

The National (Scotland): Sturgeon to set out new lifeline to keep Scotland in single market

A major research study in October warned Scotland would suffer a “devastating” Brexit bombshell with its towns and cities losing nearly £30 billion as a result of the UK leaving the EU without a deal.   The analysis suggested every part of Scotland and the UK as a whole would be affected by a soft Brexit, which would retain access to the single market during a transition period, according to the London School of Economics (LSE).


Related Links:
The National (Scotland) - Sturgeon to set out new lifeline to keep Scotland in single market

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 30 November 2017

Twitter: Peston on Sunday‏ : @pestononsunday

How will your local area be affected by #Brexit? Our final #GeekoftheWeek goes to @HenryOverman with his @NIESRorg chart looking at the local economic impact of Brexit.

 

Peston on Sunday Retweeted

Heather Rolfe‏ @Heather_Rolfe Dec 3

.@henryoverman wins #Peston geek of the week award for research on regional #Brexit impacts! See the paper here.....https://twitter.com/NIESRorg/status/936866274151424000 …


Related Links:
Twitter - Peston on Sunday‏ : @pestononsunday

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 30 November 2017

Centre for Cities: City Talks: If we build it, will they come?

Andrew Carter talks to Bridget Rosewell and Henry Overman about the merits of big infrastructure projects.  In this month’s episode, our chief executive Andrew Carter talks with Bridget Rosewell, Commissioner of the National Infrastructure Commisssion, and Henry Overman, Professor of Economic Geography at LSE, about the role of infrastructure in supporting economic growth and jobs across the country.


Related Links:
Centre for Cities - City Talks: If we build it, will they come?

Henry Overman webpage



Tuesday 28 November 2017

The Property Chronicle: Stamp duty, mobility and the housing crisis

Article by Christian Hilber and Teemu Lyytikainen

How replacing stamp duty with better-designed local taxes could alleviate the crisis of housing availability.  The SDLT (commonly labelled ‘stamp duty’) has long been criticised by economists as being inefficient. The central case against it is that it hampers household mobility.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC/Urban and Spatial Programme Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, Journal of Urban Economics 101, September 2017

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0094119017300542


Related Links:
The Property Chronicle - Stamp duty, mobility and the housing crisis

Stamp duty, mobility and the UK housing crisis

Christian Hilber webpage



Monday 27 November 2017

NIESR Blog: The local economic impacts of Brexit

Article by Henry Overman

Much has been written about the impact that Brexit might have on the national economy. We know far less about how that impact might vary across the UK. In a recent paper published in the National Institute Economic Review , myself and colleagues at the Centre for Economic Performance (Swati Dhingra and Steve Machin) provide some preliminary answers. The research looks at the difference in predicted effects across all Local Authority Areas under a 'soft' and a 'hard' Brexit scenario (the former involves zero tariffs, but increased non-tariff barriers with the EU, the latter involves non-zero tariffs and even higher non-tariff barriers). It also provides some initial analysis on whether these predicted impacts are likely to exacerbate or alleviate existing disparities and looks at how the predicted economic impacts of Brexit correlate with voting patterns from the referendum.


Related Links:
NIESR Blog - The local economic impacts of Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 27 November 2017

De Welt: Britische Regionen fordern Brexit-Extrawürste

However, the regions that are now calling for special rules do not belong to those parts of the country that Brexit is likely to hit particularly hard economically. According to calculations by economists at the London School of Economics, London and the southeast, and some districts in the East Midlands, are likely to suffer from the EU exit. There, the forecasts point to particularly strong losses in economic growth. Even after the financial crisis, it became clear that London and the South were hit hardest by the consequences, explains Swati Dhingra, one of the authors of the study. However, thanks to their economic power, these regions would have recovered much more quickly. As an all-clear she does not want to know that understood. Overall, the consequences of Brexit are negative for the whole country.


Related Links:
De Welt - Britische Regionen fordern Brexit-Extrawürste

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



Friday 24 November 2017

De Welt (Germany): Britische Regionen fordern Brexit-Extrawürste

However, the regions that are now calling for special rules do not belong to those parts of the country that Brexit is likely to hit particularly hard economically. According to calculations by economists at the London School of Economics, London and the southeast, and some districts in the East Midlands, are likely to suffer from the EU exit. There, the forecasts point to particularly strong losses in economic growth. Even after the financial crisis, it became clear that London and the South were hit hardest by the consequences, explains Swati Dhingra, one of the authors of the study. However, thanks to their economic power, these regions would have recovered much more quickly. As an all-clear she does not want to know that understood. Overall, the consequences of Brexit are negative for the whole country.


Related Links:
De Welt (Germany) - Britische Regionen fordern Brexit-Extrawürste

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 13 November 2017

What Works Growth blog: The good news about exports

Article by Henry Overman: With Brexit looming, we’ve been running a series of workshops with local areas to think about different policy responses and consider what the evidence says on effectiveness. One thing that local areas wanted to know was what the evaluation evidence said on export support and inward investment promotion. In response, we’ve surveyed the available evaluations and launched three new toolkits that consider what we can learn. Two of the toolkits look at supporting exports through either export promotion agencies (EPA) or export credit agencies (ECA). The third, looks at inward investment promotion.


Related Links:
What Works Growth blog - The good news about exports

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 08 November 2017

Scottish Energy News: CBI survey shows 98% of British energy firms want post-Brexit investment framework

Meanwhile, the risks of Scotland crashing out of the EU without the UK government securing a deal have been revealed in a damning report by the London School of Economics. Figures show that every single part of Scotland, and of the UK as a whole, will be adversely affected even in the event of a soft Brexit with single market membership maintained. The impact of dropping off a hard Brexit cliff edge would be significantly worse.


Related Links:
Scottish Energy News - CBI survey shows 98% of British energy firms want post-Brexit investment framework

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Tuesday 07 November 2017

Daily Record and Sunday Mail: Brexit could cost South Lanarkshire £1.3 billion

South Lanarkshire could lose out to the tune of £1.3 billion after Brexit according to statistics from the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
Daily Record and Sunday Mail - Brexit could cost South Lanarkshire £1.3 billion

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Tuesday 07 November 2017

LSE Business Review blog: Diamond Light Source and its impact on the UK geographical distribution of science

Article by Christian Helmers and Henry Overman

Big scientific research facilities like the UK’s Diamond Light Source, a third generation synchrotron (circular particle accelerator), benefit scientists located nearby significantly more than scientists located further away. According to our research, the highly localised effects of scientific infrastructure on research productivity extend even to scientists that do not rely on the facilities directly for their work.

Related publications

'In brief... Where top science gets done', Christian Helmers and Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 3, Autumn 2017 [http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/CentrePiece_22_3.pdf]

My Precious! The Location and Diffusion of Scientific Research: Evidence from the Synchrotron Diamond Light Source, by Christian Helmers and Henry Overman, Economic Journal 127(604): 2006-40

'My Precious! The Location and Diffusion of Scientific Research: Evidence from the Synchrotron Diamond Light Source', Christian Helmers and Henry Overman, SERC/Urban and Spatial Programme Discussion Paper No. 131, March 2013

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0131.pdf


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - Diamond Light Source and its impact on the UK geographical distribution of science

In brief ... Where top science gets done

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 06 November 2017

BBC Parliament: Live House of Commons

Ronnie Cowan, SNP, Inverclyde:  A report from the centre for cities and the Centre for economic performance and the London School of Economics said that all cities would schedule increasing costs, Edinburgh was ranked among the ten most affected cities, connecting HS2 to Scotland must be a priority.


Related Links:
BBC Parliament - Live House of Commons

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 06 November 2017

LBC Radio: [8:25:22 am]

...Chancellor Philip Hammond is looking to reform the planning system by allowing building on the green belt to help more people possibly young people get on the housing ladder this attempt result the housing crisis and high demand areas this is a story in the Sunday Telegraph yesterday Paul Cheshire Professor of economic geography at the LSE London school of economics we welcome this good morning a winner here I would very much welcome to the first real action to get more houses built.


Related Links:
LBC Radio - [8:25:22 am]

Paul Cheshire webpage



Thursday 02 November 2017

Welt: Schon jetzt kostet der Brexit jeden Briten 682 Euro/Already, the Brexit costs every Briton 682 euros

Another study by the institute examining the regional implications of Brexit concludes that the south around London is likely to be hit particularly hard, as well as the region around Manchester and the south of Scotland. These are in each case regions that predominantly voted to remain in the EU. "But we see negative effects everywhere," said economist Swati Dhingra, one of the authors of the study.


Related Links:
Welt - Schon jetzt kostet der Brexit jeden Briten 682 Euro/Already, the Brexit costs every Briton 682 euros

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Tuesday 31 October 2017

Helensburgh Advertiser: New figures reveal likely Brexit impact on Argyll and Bute

Research by the London School of Economics forecasts that even in the event of a Brexit transition deal being struck, the Argyll and Bute economy will shrink by 2 per cent.


Related Links:
Helensburgh Advertiser - New figures reveal likely Brexit impact on Argyll and Bute

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Tuesday 31 October 2017

Press and Journal (Aberdeen): Argyll could be £350 million out of pocket as a result of Brexit

Scotland’s Brexit Secretary Mike Russell told the convention that a report out last week revealed a soft exit from the EU would leave the area £150million worse off, while a “hard, no deal Brexit,” would take the figure up to £350million. The report was published by the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
Press and Journal (Aberdeen) - Argyll could be £350 million out of pocket as a result of Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 30 October 2017

Mail online: Axe stamp duty in the Budget, Hammond is told: Scrap ‘worst tax’ to boost the economy, says think-tank

Earlier this year, a report by the London School of Economics and the VATT Institute for Economic Research said the rate of home moving would be 27 per cent higher without stamp duty.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC/Urban and Spatial Programme Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Mail online - Axe stamp duty in the Budget, Hammond is told: Scrap ‘worst tax’ to boost the economy, says think-tank

Christian Hilber webpage



Sunday 29 October 2017

BBC TV Midlands: Sunday Politics

Mention of figures from the London School of Economics on the impact of a ‘no-deal’ Brexit on Birmingham’s economy.


Related Links:
BBC TV Midlands - Sunday Politics

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Saturday 28 October 2017

The Straits Times: Messy divorce looms as Brexit talks go nowhere

The overall impression in other European capitals is that the British want to have their cake and eat it, by leaving the EU and yet retaining all its advantages, a demand which no EU government is prepared to concede. Squabbles inside Mrs May's ruling Conservative Party add to the confusion. A group of ardent anti-European former senior Cabinet ministers has published an open letter to the Prime Minister, urging her to simply crash out of the EU with no deal; Britons should "concentrate our resources on resolving administrative issues" rather than trade negotiations, they say. But recent analysis compiled by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics indicates that the option of leaving the EU without a negotiated trade deal could cost the British economy £430 billion (S$773 billion) over the first five years, or around 5 per cent of the country's total output.


Related Links:
The Straits Times - Messy divorce looms as Brexit talks go nowhere

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 26 October 2017

BBC TV Scotland: Scottish Questions

Snippet: Mention of LSE study on cost of Brexit for Scotland


Related Links:
BBC TV Scotland - Scottish Questions

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 25 October 2017

The Press and Journal (Aberdeen): Scottish Secretary “does not recognise” expert analysis of Brexit hit to Aberdeen

Scottish Secretary David Mundell has told opponents of Brexit to stop bandying about “damning figures” such as an analysis that Aberdeen will be worst hit by the divorce from Brussels. The London School of Economics yesterday published data suggesting a “no deal” departure from the bloc would cost the Granite City £3.5billion over five years – £1billion more than a so-called “soft” Brexit.


Related Links:
The Press and Journal (Aberdeen) - Scottish Secretary “does not recognise” expert analysis of Brexit hit to Aberdeen

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 25 October 2017

Yorkshire Post: Leeds set to lose out on £6.4bn in a ‘Hard’ Brexit

However, the Department for Exiting the EU recently rejected requests to publish the analysis, arguing that there was a risk of a knock-on effect on national and regional economies . But the Lib Dems have workd with experts at the London School of Economics to produce their own estimates of the effects of a “hard” and “soft” Brexit.The party claims the cities of London and Birmingham are set to be the worst-hit in the event of a “no deal” exit, with parts of the capital seeing a 9.5 percent drop in output. However, it also suggests that Leeds, which has one of the biggest financial services sectors outside of the South East, could see a drop in output of up to six percent – equivalent to £6.4bn.


Related Links:
Yorkshire Post - Leeds set to lose out on £6.4bn in a ‘Hard’ Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 25 October 2017

BBC News online: Brexit impact study ‘will not be published’ UK government assessments of the potential economic impact of Brexit on Scotland will not be made public, the Brexit secretary has confirmed.

But the analysis will be shared with the Scottish government, David Davis told a committee of MPs. Mr Davis told the Brexit select committee that publishing the analysis could undermine the national interest. However, Nicola Sturgeon said people had a right to know how leaving the EU would affect all areas of the UK. And she said any refusal to release the information to the public would be "unconscionable". Research published by the London School of Economics earlier this week estimated the loss of economic output in Scotland could be £30bn.


Related Links:
BBC News online - Brexit impact study ‘will not be published’ UK government assessments of the potential economic impact of Brexit on Scotland will not be made public, the Brexit secretary has confirmed.

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 25 October 2017

The Scotsman: Leader comment: Brexit figures must not be kept secret

It is still unclear whether we are heading for a ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ Brexit but, amid calls for a second referendum, it is important that voters are told about the UK Government’s own estimates of the potential damage. Westminster’s decision to share its so-far confidential Brexit impact report with the Scottish Government is welcome, but it must also eventually come clean with the public. The reason for keeping the report’s conclusions secret – that it would result in “precipitating preemptive and reactionary assumptions” that would damage the economy – hardly inspires confidence. Neither does an estimate by the respected London School of Economics, which found Scotland’s output could fall by £30 billion over five years if there is no trade deal with the EU.


Related Links:
The Scotsman - Leader comment: Brexit figures must not be kept secret

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 25 October 2017

The Times: Live just outside conservation area for property price boost

Researchers at the London School of Economics found that house prices in England’s 8,000 conservation zones, which vary from the seaside town of Morecambe, Lancashire, to the industrial canals of Castlefield, Manchester, are being held back by the regulations that keep them historic.

Related publications

Game of Zones: The Political Economy of Conservation Areas, Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Kristoffer Moeller, Sevrin Waights and Nicolai Wendland, The Economic Journal, 127: F421–F445, October 2017

doi:10.1111/ecoj.12454

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ecoj.12454/abstract?campaign=woletoc


Related Links:
The Times - Live just outside conservation area for property price boost

Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage

Sevrin Waights webpage



Tuesday 24 October 2017

The Economic Journal Volume 127, Feature Issue: 24 OCT 2017: Game of Zones: The Political Economy of Conservation Areas (pages F421–F445)

Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Kristoffer Moeller, Sevrin Waights and Nicolai Wendland

DOI: 10.1111/ecoj.12454

Related publications

Game of Zones: The Economics of Conservation Areas Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Kristoffer Moeller, Sevrin Waights and Nicolai Wendland, SERC/CEP Discussion Paper No.143, September 2017


Related Links:
The Economic Journal Volume 127, Feature Issue: 24 OCT 2017 - Game of Zones: The Political Economy of Conservation Areas (pages F421–F445)

Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage

Sevrin Waights webpage



Tuesday 24 October 2017

Original 106 FM: Snippet: News story about study on the impact of Brexit on Aberdeen

Snippet: News story about study on the impact of Brexit on Aberdeen 


Related Links:
Original 106 FM - Snippet: News story about study on the impact of Brexit on Aberdeen

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Tuesday 24 October 2017

BBC Radio (Shetland): (10/24/2017 6:20:18 AM)

Snippet: Discussion of study on cost of Brexit for Scotland


Related Links:
BBC Radio (Shetland) - (10/24/2017 6:20:18 AM)

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Stephen Machin webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Tuesday 24 October 2017

The Times (Scotland): Cities stand to lose billions from Brexit

Scotland’s biggest cities stand to lose billions of pounds if the UK government fails to secure a Brexit deal, the Liberal Democrats have claimed (Hamish Macdonell writes). The party commissioned analysis from the London School of Economics which, it claims, shows that Edinburgh, Glasgow and Aberdeen would all suffer massive damage to their economic output under a “hard Brexit”.


Related Links:
The Times (Scotland) - Cities stand to lose billions from Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 23 October 2017

Economic Policy Volume 32, Issue 92, October 2017: Articles Editors’ Choice

Who voted for Brexit? A comprehensive district-level analysis – Sascha O Becker, Thiemo Fetzer and Dennis Novy

‘On 23 June 2016, the British electorate voted to leave the European Union (EU). We analyse vote and turnout shares across 380 local authority areas in the United Kingdom. We find that exposure to the EU in terms of immigration and trade provides relatively little explanatory power for the referendum vote. Instead, we find that fundamental characteristics of the voting population were key drivers of the Vote Leave share, in particular their education profiles, their historical dependence on manufacturing employment as well as low income and high unemployment. At the much finer level of wards within cities, we find that areas with deprivation in terms of education, income and employment were more likely to vote Leave. Our results indicate that a higher turnout of younger voters, who were more likely to vote Remain, would not have overturned the referendum result. We also compare our UK results to voting patterns for the far-right leader Marine Le Pen in the 2017 French presidential election. We find similar factors driving the French vote. An out-of-sample prediction of the French vote using UK estimates performs reasonably well.’

[Full Text – Free access] [PDF]


Related Links:
Economic Policy Volume 32, Issue 92, October 2017 - Articles Editors’ Choice

Who Voted for Brexit? A Comprehensive District-Level Analysis

Thiemo Fetzer webpage

Dennis Novy webpage



Monday 23 October 2017

The Herald (Scotland): New analysis suggests Scotland would lose billions of pounds with Brexit

Every part of Scotland and the UK as a whole would be affected by a soft Brexit, which would retain access to the single market during a transition period, according to the London School of Economics (LSE). However, its experts warned they would suffer a much worse fate under a hard no-deal Brexit.


Related Links:
The Herald (Scotland) - New analysis suggests Scotland would lose billions of pounds with Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 23 October 2017

Birmingham Mail: Birmingham would lose almost £7 billion from a ‘hard Brexit’

Birmingham would be the second most damaged city in Britain by a hard Brexit, new research has revealed. The city's economy would lose £6.82 billion over five years. The figures, published by the respected Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, show how much the city's economy would shrink if the UK left the European Union without a deal giving us full access to the Single Market and the Customs Union.


Related Links:
Birmingham Mail - Birmingham would lose almost £7 billion from a ‘hard Brexit’

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 23 October 2017

Evening Standard: Hard Brexit ‘would cost London more than £100bn’

London boroughs from the suburbs to the City stand to lose billions of pounds from Brexit, new research revealed today. The impact of a “hard” exit without a trade deal would cost the capital’s economy over £100 billion over five years, while a softer departure could cost some £58 billion. The impact would be heaviest in the City of London which would lose £22 billion from a 9.5 per cent drop in output in a hard Brexit, according to an analysis of London School of Economics studies by the Liberal Democrats.


Related Links:
Evening Standard - Hard Brexit ‘would cost London more than £100bn’

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 23 October 2017

ChronicleLive (Newcastle): This is how much a ‘no-deal’ Brexit would drain out of Newcastle and the rest of the North East

Newcastle’s economy would shrink by £1.92bn, a fall in economic output of 5%. The figures, published by the respected Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, show how much the city’s economy would shrink if the UK left the European Union without a deal giving us full access to the Single Market and the Customs Union.


Related Links:
ChronicleLive (Newcastle) - This is how much a ‘no-deal’ Brexit would drain out of Newcastle and the rest of the North East

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



Sunday 22 October 2017

Mail online: Leaving the EU without a trade deal could cost Britain £430 BILLION over five years, warns Vince Cable

Using calculations based on research by the London School of Economics, the Lib Dems say that if the UK exits the EU in March 2019 without a deal, Britain’s economic output in the five years after Brexit would be reduced by 5.3 per cent, or £430 billion. Even if the UK agreed to a Norway-style arrangement, in which we retain full access to the Single Market, there would still be a reduction of 2.9 per cent – or £235 billion. London would be worst hit by a no-deal Brexit, with a £115 billion fall in output up to March 2024.


Related Links:
Mail online - Leaving the EU without a trade deal could cost Britain £430 BILLION over five years, warns Vince Cable

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



Saturday 21 October 2017

Daily Mirror: New Brexit research suggests Britain’s bill for leaving the EU without a deal

Leaving the EU will cost Britain £430billion over five years if no deal is done, research suggests. Even a “soft” Norway-style Brexit could cost the ­country £235billion – sparking serious fears for the economy. The analysis, seen by the Liberal Democrats, show all parts of the UK would be hit – from ­City of London financiers to industries in the regions. The analysis came from the London Schools of Economics Centre for Economic Performance. It found if the UK exits the EU in March 2019 without a trade deal, its economic output in the following five years would be down 5.3 per cent, equivalent to £430billion. Also in: Sunday Mirror - The People on 22 October 2017 'No-Deal Brexit to cost £430BN: Warning of economic turmoil for whole UK' [No link available]

 


Related Links:
Daily Mirror - New Brexit research suggests Britain’s bill for leaving the EU without a deal

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 19 October 2017

The Street.com: Goldman CEO Lloyd Blankfein trolls Britain’s Brexit plans with Frankfurt tweet

The London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance and Centre for Cities estimates the British capital could lose as much as £18 billion ($23.7 billion) in annual revenue and as many as 30,000 jobs, a figure that EY suggests could rise to 83,000 in a worst-case "Hard Brexit" scenario.


Related Links:
The Street.com - Goldman CEO Lloyd Blankfein trolls Britain’s Brexit plans with Frankfurt tweet

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 09 October 2017

Henley Standard: Prices hit a high, but is crash coming?

It seems things are slowing down. And two distinct camps are emerging: the “priced out” generation, who are hoping a crash will lead to house prices they can afford, and the “propertied” generation, who are worried a crash will bring the whole UK economy crashing down. But does either camp have anything to worry about? It’s hard to tell, since the experts also for their part appear to be in two different camps.

So while Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, has warned that prices could fall by as much as 40 per cent in the near future, Russell Galley, managing director at the Halifax Community Bank, had this to say: “Recent figures for mortgage approvals suggest some buoyancy may be returning, possibly on the back of strong recent employment growth, with the unemployment rate falling to a 42-year low...“House prices should continue to be supported by low mortgage rates and a continuing shortage of properties for sale over the coming months.”

Related links

Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=cheshire


Related Links:
Henley Standard - Prices hit a high, but is crash coming?

Paul Cheshire webpage



Monday 09 October 2017

Henley Standard: Prices hit a high, but is crash coming?

It seems things are slowing down. And two distinct camps are emerging: the “priced out” generation, who are hoping a crash will lead to house prices they can afford, and the “propertied” generation, who are worried a crash will bring the whole UK economy crashing down. But does either camp have anything to worry about? It’s hard to tell, since the experts also for their part appear to be in two different camps.

So while Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, has warned that prices could fall by as much as 40 per cent in the near future, Russell Galley, managing director at the Halifax Community Bank, had this to say: “Recent figures for mortgage approvals suggest some buoyancy may be returning, possibly on the back of strong recent employment growth, with the unemployment rate falling to a 42-year low...“House prices should continue to be supported by low mortgage rates and a continuing shortage of properties for sale over the coming months.”

Related links

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=cheshire


Related Links:
Henley Standard - Prices hit a high, but is crash coming?

Paul Cheshire webpage



Monday 09 October 2017

BBC News: Pembrokeshire council vote for Brexit working group

A working group will be set up to prepare Pembrokeshire for the effect of Brexit, following a council vote. The county could lose £35.4m in trade if the United Kingdom opts for a "hard" Brexit, according to a report by the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
BBC News - Pembrokeshire council vote for Brexit working group

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Saturday 07 October 2017

The Times: A broken housing market – and how to fix it

…a shortfall of more than 109,000 new homes across England alone. Of that figure, 86 per cent were needed in parts ofthe country with the highest housing demand. Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at London School of Economics, is adamant that if ...

Related links

Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=cheshire


Related Links:
The Times - A broken housing market – and how to fix it

Paul Cheshire webpage



Friday 06 October 2017

Western Telegraph: Report to Pembrokeshire County Council cabinet compares likely impact of Brexit to Sea Empress oil disaster

Brexit will hit Pembrokeshire harder than the Sea Empress disaster, according to a comparison made in a report for Cabinet next week. The Director of Development’s report ahead of an agenda item called 'Planning for Brexit' outlines a proposal that the County Council prepare for the change in financial circumstances likely once the UK “terminates” its membership of the EU. The report acknowledges the likely impact on Pembrokeshire is difficult to assess but looked at the findings of a study carried out by the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
Western Telegraph - Report to Pembrokeshire County Council cabinet compares likely impact of Brexit to Sea Empress oil disaster

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 04 October 2017

Bloomberg News Online: U.K.''s Help to Buy seen stoking London property values: chart

The U.K. government’s decision to expand its Help to Buy program is drawing criticism because it may stimulate London’s property market again. Unless supply improves, the effect of the program is to increase home values and transfer “real assets to the wealthy or, in this case, the relatively wealthier,” said Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics and Political Science. It’s irresponsible to be encouraging first-time buyers into the U.K. capital’s “overpriced market” via the program, said Neal Hudson, founder of research firm Residential Analysts Ltd.

Related links

Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=cheshire

 


Related Links:
Bloomberg News Online - U.K.''s Help to Buy seen stoking London property values: chart

Paul Cheshire webpage



Monday 02 October 2017

Bloomberg News online: More Manna From Heaven for Britain''s Lucky Builders

The cure for the U.K. housing market is more supply, not more demand. It's true that Help to Buy's introduction in 2013 and a market rebound gave developers the incentive to build more, with new starts in 2016 at their highest since the crisis. Yet since 1970, construction has fallen while prices have risen, according to Dr. Christian Hilber, of the London School of Economics. Help To Buy isn't doing much to close this gap.


Related Links:
Bloomberg News online - More Manna From Heaven for Britain''s Lucky Builders

Christian Hilber webpage



Monday 02 October 2017

GrowthBusiness.co.uk: How to grow with R&D tax credits

R&D tax relief encourages investment in research and development across the economy, according to a recently published study by the London School of Economics (LSE). Researchers from the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) noted that a downward trend in UK business enterprise R&D had levelled off in the mid-2000s. They also noted a change in government policy on R&D tax relief in 2008. This extended the more generous R&D tax relief scheme for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to firms with assets above €43 million (the original limit) to those with assets up to €86 million.


Related Links:
GrowthBusiness.co.uk - How to grow with R&D tax credits

Do Tax Incentives for Research Increase Firm Innovation? An RD Design for R&D

Antoine Dechezleprêtre webpage

Elias Einiö webpage

Ralf Martin webpage

Kieu-Trang Nguyen webpage

John Van reenen webpage



Tuesday 19 September 2017

MoneyWeek: The UK cities that will be most affected by Brexit

It’s important to realise that, while Brexit will have an effect on the whole of the UK, it will not be spread evenly around the country. In an attempt to look at the relative winners and losers, the think-tank Centre for Cities and the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance teamed up to produce Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities.  This report, by Naomi Clayton and Professor Henry Overman, attempts to model the impact on a much finer level.


Related Links:
MoneyWeek - The UK cities that will be most affected by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



Sunday 17 September 2017

City A.M.: Is a UK house price crash coming? The majority of people think so, survey finds

Some economists have warned that the UK is heading for a house price collapse London School of Economics professor Paul Cheshire has said we are due "a significant correction".


Related Links:
City A.M. - Is a UK house price crash coming? The majority of people think so, survey finds

Paul Cheshire webpage



Tuesday 12 September 2017

GetReading: See how MPs for Berkshire voted in the Brexit Repeal Bill

Earlier in the summer, research from think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics revealed Reading is likely to be one of the areas hit hardest by Brexit.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
GetReading - See how MPs for Berkshire voted in the Brexit Repeal Bill

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 07 September 2017

What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth blog: The local economic impacts of Brexit

I've been working with colleagues at the Centre for Economic Performance (Swati Dhingra and Steve Machin) and the Centre for Cities (Naomi Clayton) to take a first look at the local economic impacts of Brexit. You can read the more technical CEP piece here and the less technical Centre for Cities piece here. The research looks at the difference in predicted effects across all Local Authority Areas and across Primary Urban Areas under a 'soft' and a 'hard' Brexit scenario (the former involves zero tariffs, but increased non-tariff barriers with the EU, the latter involves non-zero tariffs and even higher non-tariff barriers). It also provides some initial analysis on whether these predicted impacts are likely to exacerbate or alleviate existing disparities and looks at how the predicted economic impacts of Brexit correlate with voting patterns from the referendum.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf

 


Related Links:
What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth blog - The local economic impacts of Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 06 September 2017

Oxford Times: Brexit has had ''little affect'' on Oxford''s finances, report finds

A report by the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance had suggested Brexit would leave all British cities adversely affected.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Oxford Times - Brexit has had ''little affect'' on Oxford''s finances, report finds

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Tuesday 05 September 2017

Mail online: How one in 79 Britons is now a MILLIONAIRE: Surging house prices increase number by 142,500 in just seven years

Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography and the London School of Economics, said: ‘The term “millionaire” has long been reserved for those considered to have extreme wealth. A distant aspiration that was unattainable for the vast majority of the UK. As house prices continue to climb, the million pound marker becomes less of a pipe dream for many of those nearing the top of the ladder.’


Related Links:
Mail online - How one in 79 Britons is now a MILLIONAIRE: Surging house prices increase number by 142,500 in just seven years

Paul Cheshire webpage



Tuesday 05 September 2017

NZHerald: How one in 79 Britons over the age of 21 are millionaires

Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography and the London School of Economics, said: "The term "millionaire" has long been reserved for those considered to have extreme wealth. A distant aspiration that was unattainable for the vast majority of the UK. As house prices continue to climb, the million pound marker becomes less of a pipe dream for many of those nearing the top of the ladder."


Related Links:
NZHerald - How one in 79 Britons over the age of 21 are millionaires

Paul Cheshire webpage



Sunday 03 September 2017

Conatus News: Post-Brexit Industrial Strategy – Dawn of a New Era for Britain?

The Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics has predicted a soft brexit is likely to increase the cost of EU trade by 2%, causing a subsequent 1% fall in British GDP, while a hard Brexit will see costs of trade increase by 8%, and a 2% fall in GDP…

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Conatus News - Post-Brexit Industrial Strategy – Dawn of a New Era for Britain?

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Sunday 03 September 2017

Financial Times: Low skills and poor infrastructure blamed for UK productivity gap

Higher skill levels among London’s workforce explains about two-thirds of the productivity gap between the capital and the rest of the country, according to Henry Overman, director of the What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth, a research centre based at the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
Financial Times - Low skills and poor infrastructure blamed for UK productivity gap

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 30 August 2017

Guardian: Do new roads boost the economy? The science is still finding its way

Steve Gibbons, a member of a London School of Economics team that has produced a series of reports on the subject, says any claims that infrastructure investment is a cost-effective way of generating growth should be treated with caution. “What all these things are doing is working out time savings-based benefits; the monetary amount attached to the time a person saves; a certain amount per hour – it’s not directly looking at the impacts on GDP,” Dr Gibbons says.

Related publications

‘New Road Infrastructure: the Effects on Firms’, Stephen Gibbons, Teemu Lyytikäinen, Henry Overman and Rosa Sanchis-Guarner, SERC Discussion Paper No.117, September 2012

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/serc/publications/download/sercdp0117.pdf


Related Links:
Guardian - Do new roads boost the economy? The science is still finding its way

Steve Gibbons webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Rosa Sanchis-guarner webpage



Sunday 27 August 2017

Finfacts: Hectare of agricultural land costs €24,000 in Ireland, €6,000 in France

Over the last full economic cycle, from 1993 to 2008, the cost of a hectare of residential land in London rose by over 300% in real terms, to more than £8m ($15m) and enough green-belt land is available in Greater London to build 1.6m houses at average densities, according to Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics (LSE) — about 30 times the number of new houses London needs a year. "But opposition from homeowners is strong — especially from those near the green belt, who do not much like the thought of newcomers bringing down property prices. Today, though approved applications to build on it have risen a bit, the green belt is virtually as big as it was in 2007. Many argue that developing brownfield land (land previously used for some industrial purpose) would solve London’s problems.

 


Related Links:
Finfacts - Hectare of agricultural land costs €24,000 in Ireland, €6,000 in France

Paul Cheshire webpage



Thursday 24 August 2017

Politics.co.uk: Why is the government so afraid to publish its Brexit impact studies?

There has been a veritable flood of studies indicating what an economic disaster awaits us if the government pursue its preferred hard Brexit route. If the government's own studies contain anything to counter this overwhelmingly pessimistic outlook, why have they not been released? We can only conclude that either the government is running scared of its own extreme form of leaving the EU, or it wants to keep a lid on the dire consequences of it. It's probably safe to assume therefore that the government's own analysis agrees with a recent Local Business Survey. It showed that of 419 small and medium sized enterprises surveyed in the South West of England, 57% of exporters believed the impact of leaving the single market will be 'negative' or 'very negative'. This compared with just ten per cent who think the impact will be 'positive' or 'very positive'. Or a recent study from the Centre for Economic Performance that examined the negative impacts of trade barriers. It predicts that under either a soft or hard Brexit scenario, leaving the EU will have a devastating impact on the economic performance of our towns and cities.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf

 


Related Links:
Politics.co.uk - Why is the government so afraid to publish its Brexit impact studies?

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 18 August 2017

Property Industry Eye: When 140 characters just isn’t enough to debate Stamp Duty

Snippet.. Professor Christian Hilber, who co-authored the LSE research, then joined in, adding: “It’s (Stamp Duty) not the main problem – the planning system is – but it contributes.”

          Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Property Industry Eye - When 140 characters just isn’t enough to debate Stamp Duty

Christian Hilber webpage



Thursday 17 August 2017

What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth blog: Shedding new light on innovation policy

Article by Max Nathan:  ...Our latest case study summarises Innovate UK's programmes of support for microbusinesses and SMEs: mainly grants but also loans, awarded on a competitive basis, either to individual firms, or to promote partnerships with other companies or with universities.


Related Links:
What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth blog - Shedding new light on innovation policy

Max Nathan webpage



Wednesday 16 August 2017

The Daily Caller: $1 increase in minimum wage would cost thousands of jobs

A $1 increase in the federal minimum wage could cost the national economy tens of thousands of jobs, according to a new study by economists Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics and David Neumark of the University of California, Irvine. The economists sourced through 35 years of data and found that increasing the minimum wage incentivizes firms to automate low-skilled labor–the very individuals who would stand to benefit the most from even marginal increases in compensation. The pair focused on workers with only a high school degree, as this group is largely the target of minimum wage laws.

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017

Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
The Daily Caller - $1 increase in minimum wage would cost thousands of jobs

Grace Lordan webpage



Wednesday 16 August 2017

This is Money.co.uk: Stamp duty is making the housing crisis worse as older homeowners stay put to avoid it - and families can''t move up the property ladder

Stamp duty is making the housing crisis worse because it is deterring older homeowners from downsizing, it has been claimed. A report by the London School of Economics and the VATT Institute for Economic Research claimed that the rate of home moving would be 27 per cent higher if the levy was completely abolished….Professor Christian Hilber, who co-authored the report, said: 'Stamp duty discourages young expanding families from moving to more adequate, larger housing and it discourages the elderly from downsizing.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
This is Money.co.uk - Stamp duty is making the housing crisis worse as older homeowners stay put to avoid it - and families can''t move up the property ladder

Christian Hilber webpage



Wednesday 16 August 2017

Times of Tunbridge Wells: Report claims Brexit will sting whatever guise it comes in…

THE economies of both Tunbridge Wells and Tonbridge will suffer in the coming years due to Brexit, a new report by the London School of Economics claims. Titled The Local Economic Effects of Brexit, the study shows every authority in the UK will see its prosperity curtailed regardless of whether it is a ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ Brexit. According to the report, if the UK was to undertake a ‘hard Brexit’, then in the ten years after crashing out of the EU the economy of Tunbridge Wells will be 2.6 per cent smaller than if it had stayed in. … The report’s authors, who work for the university’s Centre for Economic Performance, state they have modelled their estimates on ‘medium to long run impact of changes to trade costs’, and have ignored effects on innovation, immigration and inward investment.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Times of Tunbridge Wells - Report claims Brexit will sting whatever guise it comes in…

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 14 August 2017

Mortgage Introducer online: Our great housing problem

A recent paper by Christian Hilber of the London School of Economics suggests that stamp duty reduces the rate of home moving by about a fifth.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Mortgage Introducer online - Our great housing problem

Christian Hilber webpage



Monday 14 August 2017

Today’s Conveyancer: Stamp duty under new scrutiny

Academics have claimed that the housing market is being adversely affected by stamp duty. According to research from the London School of Economics and the VATT Institute for Economic Research, the duty is deterring households from moving, especially where the distance between properties is small.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf

 


Related Links:
Today’s Conveyancer - Stamp duty under new scrutiny

Christian Hilber webpage



Saturday 12 August 2017

The Times: The regions can be our road to revival, but only if transport links are improved

A rebalancing is long overdue. “Regional disparities are wider in the UK than other western European countries,” according to the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance. One reason why London’s productivity, and hence wealth, is so much greater than Britain’s other cities is the sophistication of the commuter network. Studies have shown that people tolerate roughly an hour’s travel but much more than that and the pool of labour available to an employer shrinks. With such a shallow pool of talent in sites as stranded as Cheshire science park, business would have to think twice about putting down roots.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017 

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The Times - The regions can be our road to revival, but only if transport links are improved

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 11 August 2017

Simple Landlords Insurance: Stamp Duty increase fuels housing crisis – new report claims

Professor Christian Hilber, who co-authored the report, said: "Stamp duty discourages young expanding families from moving to more adequate, larger housing and it discourages the elderly from downsizing. "Our analysis suggests that mobility would be 27 per cent higher if stamp duty was abolished or replaced with an annual tax on the value of property."

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Simple Landlords Insurance - Stamp Duty increase fuels housing crisis – new report claims

Christian Hilber webpage



Friday 11 August 2017

Property Investor Today: Cut stamp duty to free up mobility, says report

Current stamp duty rates are deterring older buyers from downsizing and therefore freeing up homes for those further down the housing ladder, but the research from the London School of Economics and the VATT Institute for Economic Research, says that moving levels would increase by over a quarter if the tax was scrapped. Professor Christian Hilber, co-author of the report, commented: “The key message is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly, it create a mismatch and distortions in the housing market. Our analysis suggests that mobility would be 27% higher if stamp duty was abolished or replaced with an annual tax on the value of property.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Property Investor Today - Cut stamp duty to free up mobility, says report

Christian Hilber webpage



Friday 11 August 2017

Landlord News: More calls for Stamp Duty to be amended

Present rates of Stamp Duty are putting older buyers off downsizing and stopping more homes coming onto the market for those at the bottom of the housing ladder. Research from the London School of Economics and the VATT Institute for Economic Research suggests that levels of moving could increase by a quarter if the tax was to be scrapped. Professor Christian Hilber, co-author of the report, observed: ‘The key message is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly, it create a mismatch and distortions in the housing market. Our analysis suggests that mobility would be 27% higher if stamp duty was abolished or replaced with an annual tax on the value of property.’

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Landlord News - More calls for Stamp Duty to be amended

Christian Hilber webpage



Friday 11 August 2017

Financial Times: Time to sound the horn for council tax reform

By raising the costs of moving home, stamp duty is likely to have “very substantial detrimental effects” on the property market, according to research released this week by academics from the London School of Economics and Finland’s VATT Institute.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Financial Times - Time to sound the horn for council tax reform

Christian Hilber webpage



Friday 11 August 2017

Investor Today: Cut stamp duty to free up mobility, says report

Current stamp duty rates are deterring older buyers from downsizing and therefore freeing up homes for those further down the housing ladder, but the research from the London School of Economics and the VATT Institute for Economic Research, says that moving levels would increase by over a quarter if the tax was scrapped.

Professor Christian Hilber, co-author of the report, commented: “The key message is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly, it create a mismatch and distortions in the housing market. Our analysis suggests that mobility would be 27% higher if stamp duty was abolished or replaced with an annual tax on the value of property.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017 http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Investor Today - Cut stamp duty to free up mobility, says report

Christian Hilber webpage



Thursday 10 August 2017

KentLive: Thanet is predicted to be the worst affected area in Kent by a ‘soft Brexit’

Experts have predicted that Thanet would be the hardest hit area of Kent in a 'soft Brexit' scenario. A new study by the London School of Economics revealed that Thanet could lose £27.2 million – based largely on the assumption the UK could still negotiate access to the EU single market.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
KentLive - Thanet is predicted to be the worst affected area in Kent by a ‘soft Brexit’

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 10 August 2017

Daily Mail: Is this the way to beat stamp duty? Savvy widower, 82, with a 10 room property ''downsizes'' by splitting his home in HALF to live in one side and let the other

Snippet: ... A report by the London School of Economics also claimed that stamp duty is making the housing crisis worse because it is deterring older homeowners from downsizing. 

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Daily Mail - Is this the way to beat stamp duty? Savvy widower, 82, with a 10 room property ''downsizes'' by splitting his home in HALF to live in one side and let the other

Christian Hilber webpage



Thursday 10 August 2017

Taizhou (China): British latest research: stamp duty into the real estate market stumbling block

Snippet: ... "The important message for our paper is that the taxation has significantly hurt the liquidity," said Professor Christian Hilber, co-author of the report.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Taizhou (China) - British latest research: stamp duty into the real estate market stumbling block

Christian Hilber webpage



Thursday 10 August 2017

Derby Telegraph: Stamp duty should be abolished to boost housing market, new report says

Co-author of the report, Professor Christian Hilber, said: “The key message of our paper is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly’…

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Derby Telegraph - Stamp duty should be abolished to boost housing market, new report says

Christian Hilber webpage



Thursday 10 August 2017

Prospect magazine: Hard or soft, Brexit will hit every British city—and pro-Leave areas will find it hardest to recover

People up and down the country can ill afford for silly season squabbles to distract us from the complexity of Brexit

…amidst the summer politicking and parties, a new report by Centre for Cities should make for sobering reading for Government ministers, particularly those pushing for a hard Brexit. The report (published in partnership with the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE) charts for the first time the likely impact of both a hard or soft Brexit on UK cities in the decade after new trade arrangements with the EU are put in place - and in both scenarios, the news isn’t good.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf

 


Related Links:
Prospect magazine - Hard or soft, Brexit will hit every British city—and pro-Leave areas will find it hardest to recover

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 10 August 2017

SKY News: Stamp duty causing bottleneck in housing market, report says

The tax is stopping young families from moving to a larger home, a report says, and deterring older people from downsizing.

Snippet: ...Professor Christian Hilber, who co-authored the report, said: "The key message of our paper is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly.....

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf

'Transfer taxes and household mobility: Distortion on the housing or labor market?' Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen Journal of Urban Economics , 2017. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0094119017300542

 

 


Related Links:
SKY News - Stamp duty causing bottleneck in housing market, report says

Christian Hilber webpage



Wednesday 09 August 2017

China Taizhou network: British latest research: stamp duty into the real estate market stumbling block

"The important message of our paper is that the taxation is significantly damaging to liquidity," said Professor Christian Hilber, co-author of the report. "" If a young family adds a filial piety, it will need to add a bedroom.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
China Taizhou network - British latest research: stamp duty into the real estate market stumbling block

Christian Hilber webpage



Wednesday 09 August 2017

Telegraph: Opinion: Stamp duty is a tax on mobility and aspiration. It should be cut substantially or abolished

A cabinet minister, who apparently wishes to remain anonymous, has told the Daily Telegraph that stamp duty must be reformed as it is exacerbating the housing crisis, stopping older homeowners from downsizing. The paper says the intervention follows a report from academics suggesting the tax reduces the rate of house moves by a third, creating a mismatch in the market. Prof Christian Hilber, of the London School of Economics, tells the paper the key message from the research is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly. "End stamp duty and unleash the economy," demands the Telegraph in an editorial. It is a problem not just for the elderly wanting to downsize, says the Telegraph, but for families looking for a larger home. Countless families are stuck in homes that no longer meet their needs, it adds.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Telegraph - Opinion: Stamp duty is a tax on mobility and aspiration. It should be cut substantially or abolished

Christian Hilber webpage



Wednesday 09 August 2017

Property Industry Eye: LSE academics become the latest to call for Stamp Duty to be scrapped

A study by the London School of Economics and the VATT Institute for Economic Research found Stamp Duty, or property transfer taxes, were making households less likely to move, particularly over shorter distances.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Property Industry Eye - LSE academics become the latest to call for Stamp Duty to be scrapped

Christian Hilber webpage



Wednesday 09 August 2017

BBC News (blog/TV): Newspaper headlines: The Papers

Snippet: ... Prof Christian Hilber, of the London School of Economics, tells the paper the key message from the research is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
BBC News (blog/TV) - Newspaper headlines: The Papers

Christian Hilber webpage



Wednesday 09 August 2017

The Sun: STAMP IT OUT Steep stamp duty is making the housing crisis WORSE because older homeowners are put off downsizing, new report claims

Snippet: ... Prof Christian Hilber, who co-authored the report, said: “The key message of our paper is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
The Sun - STAMP IT OUT Steep stamp duty is making the housing crisis WORSE because older homeowners are put off downsizing, new report claims

Christian Hilber webpage



Wednesday 09 August 2017

London Loves Business: Stamp duty exacerbating housing crisis and impacting economic growth

Snippet: ... Professor Christian Hilber, who co-authored the report told the Daily Telegraph: “The key message of our paper is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
London Loves Business - Stamp duty exacerbating housing crisis and impacting economic growth

Christian Hilber webpage



Wednesday 09 August 2017

Property118: LSE call on Chancellor to reform Stamp duty

Snippet: ... Co-author of the report, Professor Christian Hilber, said: “The key message of our paper is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Property118 - LSE call on Chancellor to reform Stamp duty

Christian Hilber webpage



Wednesday 09 August 2017

Express: ‘Draconian’ Stamp Duty will trigger HUGE house price CRASH by stopping elderly downsizing

Snippet: ... LSE Professor Christian Hilber said: "If you are a young family and you have an additional child, you'll need an additional room, but the stamp duty is discouraging this kind of move because of the additional cost and lack of available homes to move into."

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Express - ‘Draconian’ Stamp Duty will trigger HUGE house price CRASH by stopping elderly downsizing

Christian Hilber webpage



Wednesday 09 August 2017

CityAM: Stamp duty "hampers mobility" as pensioners cling onto family homes

The academic paper, published jointly by the London School of Economics and the VATT Institute for Economic Research, estimates the level of home moving would increase by 27 per cent if the levy was abolished outright.

Professor Christian Hilber, co-author of the report, said: “The key message of our paper is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
CityAM - Stamp duty "hampers mobility" as pensioners cling onto family homes

Christian Hilber webpage



Tuesday 08 August 2017

Telegraph: Opinion: Stamp duty is a tax on mobility and aspiration. It should be cut substantially or abolished

However, research from the LSE and the VATT Institute for Economic Research suggests the human cost of stamp duty is even higher. It artificially reduces the rate at which people move by nearly one-third, it says, creating a “mismatch” in the market. The tax is a problem for growing...

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Telegraph - Opinion: Stamp duty is a tax on mobility and aspiration. It should be cut substantially or abolished

Christian Hilber webpage



Tuesday 08 August 2017

The Daily Telegraph: Stamp duty exacerbating housing crisis by stopping elderly from moving, warns Cabinet minister

Snippet: ... A report from academics said stamp duty reduces the rate of home moving by nearly a third and meant that large homes were not being freed up for young, growing families.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
The Daily Telegraph - Stamp duty exacerbating housing crisis by stopping elderly from moving, warns Cabinet minister

Christian Hilber webpage



Monday 07 August 2017

Guardian: Is it a bad idea to buy a property in London if it's not home for life?

Recent claims – made by Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics – of an impending crash and a 40% fall in property values are “quite frankly outrageously unrealistic” according to Russell Quirk, founder and chief executive of online estate agent, eMoov.co.uk. “The reality is that the rate of house-price growth has slowed in the past few months, yet property prices remain higher than a year ago” although Quirk does concede, as do other commentators, that there is “a potential prolonged flat rate of growth” in house prices.


Related Links:
Guardian - Is it a bad idea to buy a property in London if it's not home for life?

Paul Cheshire webpage



Monday 07 August 2017

CityMetric: Which British cities will be hit hardest by Brexit?

A lot of my time at work is given over to worrying fitfully about two things. One is cities policy. The other is Brexit. What could be more thrilling, then, than a report which combines those two topics into a single piece of research? The answer, as it turns out, is almost anything, because this report is one of the most depressing things I’ve seen in ages. The study, a joint effort between the Centre for Cities and LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, looks at what both “Hard” and “Soft” Brexit would do to the economies of 62 British cities. (In the unlikely event you’re unsure, “soft” Brexit means we stay in a free trade area with the EU, but have to content with new non-tariff barriers; “hard” Brexit means we have to deal with tariffs as well.)

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
CityMetric - Which British cities will be hit hardest by Brexit?

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



Sunday 06 August 2017

Wales online: Top economists have calculated the impact of a soft or hard Brexit on Swansea

Their research found that every local authority would be negatively affected under either scenario but concluded that the economic impact of leaving the single market and customs union would be around twice as severe as a milder Brexit. The academics said they were surprised that the additional cost of a hard Brexit was significantly higher in some areas than others – and cited the nature of industry and employment in those areas as the reason.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Wales online - Top economists have calculated the impact of a soft or hard Brexit on Swansea

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Sunday 06 August 2017

Spirit FM: West Sussex town ranked ‘second most affected' area post-Brexit

A new report by think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) predicts Worthing will be on the places hit hardest by an expected downturn in trade after the country leaves the EU.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Spirit FM - West Sussex town ranked ‘second most affected' area post-Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Saturday 05 August 2017

Economist: A little-noticed change in Britain’s housing market spells trouble for everybody

in the last decade, the average amount of stamp duty charged per residential transaction has risen by 30% in real terms (though recent changes have lightened the load slightly for some). The need to pay thousands of pounds upfront makes upping sticks harder. According to a recent paper from Christian Hilber of the London School of Economics and Teemu Lyytikäinen of the VATT Institute for Economic Research, stamp duty reduces the rate of home-moving by about a fifth. It partly explains why home-owners in Britain move home half as frequently as they do in America, where the equivalent tax is usually less onerous.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Economist - A little-noticed change in Britain’s housing market spells trouble for everybody

Christian Hilber webpage



Saturday 05 August 2017

Economist: A little-noticed change in Britain's housing market spells trouble for everybody

A little-noticed change in Britain’s housing market spells trouble for everybody

Snippet: ...n has risen by 30% in real terms (though recent changes have lightened the load slightly). The need to pay thousands of pounds upfront makes upping sticks harder. According to a recent paper from Christian Hilber of the London School of Economics and Teemu Lyytikäine...

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Economist - A little-noticed change in Britain's housing market spells trouble for everybody

Christian Hilber webpage



Saturday 05 August 2017

Slough Express: Slough to be among top urban areas to feel negatie impact of Brexit, study says

New research suggests that Slough will be among the top five UK urban areas to be negatively impacted by Brexit. A report by the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance and think tank Centre for Cities says the South-east of England and urban areas will be hit the hardest. The paper, titled ‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, assesses the impact of trade barriers associated with 'soft' and 'hard' Brexit scenarios.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Slough Express - Slough to be among top urban areas to feel negatie impact of Brexit, study says

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 04 August 2017

The Press and Journal (Scotland): ‘Labour created the welfare state and will always fight to protect it'

Britain’s most successful cities with large high-skilled service sectors will be hit hardest by the expected downturn in trade after the UK leaves the EU. Sadly, that means bad news for Aberdeen. A report from the think-tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance placed the Granite City at the top of the list of “most affected” cities.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The Press and Journal (Scotland) - ‘Labour created the welfare state and will always fight to protect it'

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 03 August 2017

Somerset County Gazette: Taunton Deane economy could take a Brexit hit of 1.2% to 2.3%

BREXIT will damage the economic performance of Taunton Deane, according to new report. The Centre for Economic Performance believes the economy in the district will take a 1.2 per cent hit under a sort Brexit - that is to say if Britain remains in the single market and the customs union. But a hard Brexit - leaving the two organisations - would see the economy suffer to the tune of 2.3 per cent. Molly Scott Cato, Green MEP for the South West, said: “This new study shows that both a hard and soft form of Brexit will have a devastating impact on the economic performance of our towns and cities across the South West.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Somerset County Gazette - Taunton Deane economy could take a Brexit hit of 1.2% to 2.3%

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 02 August 2017

Heart Berkshire (Radio): [06:00:00]

Snippet: ... Reading has come out third on a list of 10 towns in the UK most likely to be hit hardest by Brexit report of the London School of Economics says Dorsey a fall i...

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Heart Berkshire (Radio) - [06:00:00]

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 02 August 2017

Getreading: Reading has been named as one of the areas likely to be hit hardest by Brexit

A new report put Reading in third place of areas worst hit by a hard Brexit

A new report by the think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics reveals the cities and towns most affected by a soft leaving of the European Union and a hard exit.

Professor Stephen Machin, from the Centre for Economic Performance, added: “This research shows that focusing on the likely local economic impacts of Brexit will be a critical ingredient for policymakers when thinking about how to offset the negative economic effects that loss of trade due to Brexit will bring.”

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Getreading - Reading has been named as one of the areas likely to be hit hardest by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Tuesday 01 August 2017

This is Wiltshire: Business leaders optimistic despite shock statistics that put Swindon among hardest hit by Brexit

The authors of the report, Naomi Clayton and Professor Henry Overman of the LSE’s Centre For Economic Performance, said: “All British cities are set to be negatively affected as a result of higher trade costs between the UK and EU, and this impact will be greater in the scenario of a ‘hard’ Brexit.”

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
This is Wiltshire - Business leaders optimistic despite shock statistics that put Swindon among hardest hit by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 31 July 2017

Swindon Advertiser: Business leaders optimistic despite shock statistics that put Swindon among hardest hit by Brexit

The London School of Economics has published an analysis of the possible effects of a ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ Brexit on towns and cities all over the country.

The report predicts that Swindon’s GVA will decline by 2.8 per cent under a hard Brexit and 1.5 per cent under a soft Brexit.

The authors of the report, Naomi Clayton and Professor Henry Overman of the LSE’s Centre For Economic Performance, said: “All British cities are set to be negatively affected as a result of higher trade costs between the UK and EU, and this impact will be greater in the scenario of a ‘hard’ Brexit.”

But Ian Larrard, the director of the Swindon and Wiltshire Initiative at Business West, shrugged off the findings and said there was good reason to be optimistic.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Swindon Advertiser - Business leaders optimistic despite shock statistics that put Swindon among hardest hit by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Sunday 30 July 2017

Guardian: Fox in the chicken house is a boon to the SNP

We are also now beginning to see why Scots voted 2:1 to remain in the EU. The thinktank Centre for Cities has predicted that Scotland’s major cities will suffer the worst consequences of Brexit, hard or soft, owing to their higher than average exposure to international markets. Aberdeen is expected to be hardest hit, losing up to half a billion over the next 10 years. We already know that a rapid loss of EU subsidies is among the threats posed to the vast majority of Scottish farmers’ security by undermining their land prices.


Related Links:
Guardian - Fox in the chicken house is a boon to the SNP

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Henry Overman webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



Sunday 30 July 2017

Gazette Live: Hard or soft Brexit? This is what experts think the impact could be on Middlesbrough either way

Middlesbrough has been singled out as one of the places which could be hardest hit by Brexit.

As the debate over the terms of the UK’s exit of the European Union continue to be debated, the potential impact on regional economies have been analysed by a think tank.

Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at London School of Economics said wealthy Southern cities will be hit hardest by both a ‘soft’ or ‘hard’ Brexit - but are also best placed to adapt to economic shocks ahead.

                  Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Gazette Live - Hard or soft Brexit? This is what experts think the impact could be on Middlesbrough either way

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Saturday 29 July 2017

The Sunday Mirror: Brexit will hit hardest across the South of England - but one place in Scotland gets the brunt

Brexit will hit hardest in the South of England, ­according to new research. But although the more prosperous cities of the South will lose the most, they will find it easiest to adapt. Aberdeen in the North of Scotland will be worst affected however.


Related Links:
The Sunday Mirror - Brexit will hit hardest across the South of England - but one place in Scotland gets the brunt

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Saturday 29 July 2017

Appsforpcdaily.com: Brexit transition deal will end by 2022, says Philip Hammond

In findings released by think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, the potential impact of either Brexit "type" on major cities in the United Kingdom was analysed for the first time.


Related Links:
Appsforpcdaily.com - Brexit transition deal will end by 2022, says Philip Hammond

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Saturday 29 July 2017

The Journal (Newcastle): Brexit recovery harder for North East – study

…Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London…

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The Journal (Newcastle) - Brexit recovery harder for North East – study

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

MSN: Brexit to hit Aberdeen worst as London set for 2.6% output fall

Brexit will hit Scottish oil capital Aberdeen the hardest of all Britain’s cities, with London also ranking highly and facing a medium-term blow to economic output of as much as 2.6 percent, academics at the London School of Economics said.


Related Links:
MSN - Brexit to hit Aberdeen worst as London set for 2.6% output fall

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Henry Overman webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

Guardian: Aberdeen to be worst hit by Brexit but all British cities will suffer

New research examining for the first time the potential impact of Brexit on cities and towns has found Aberdeen could be the hardest hit by higher trade costs with the European Union, though no British city will escape its effects.


Related Links:
The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Henry Overman webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

LSE British Politics and Policy blog: The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

Article by Henry Overman: The LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (working with the Centre for Cities think tank) has carried out a study shedding light upon the local economic impact of Brexit. Henry G. Overman writes that it is the richer cities, predominantly in the south of England, that will be hit hardest by Brexit, with this effect particularly apparent in areas specialised in services.


Related Links:
LSE British Politics and Policy blog - The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Henry Overman webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

Mortgage Strategy: Fill the information void for FTBs, writes Bamford

To the outsider (that is, the consumer), the property market is issuing mixed messages. In fact these are simply differences of opinion.

Take, for instance, Professor Paul Cheshire at the London School of Economics, who recently made headlines by suggesting not only that house prices were due to collapse but that the drop could be as much as 40 per cent.


Related Links:
Mortgage Strategy - Fill the information void for FTBs, writes Bamford

Paul Cheshire webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

Get Surrey: How much of Surrey's land is taken up by fairways and putting greens

Woking has the highest density of golf courses of anywhere in the UK at more than 10%

According to The Guardian , Surrey has more land for golf courses than homes thanks to planning policies that ensure the land stays cheap for the courses and prevents housing competing.

Quoting Paul Cheshire, professor emeritus of economic geography at LSE who produced the set of data, the article adds that around 2.65% of Surrey is now under golf courses.


Related Links:
Get Surrey - How much of Surrey's land is taken up by fairways and putting greens

Paul Cheshire webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

City AM: These are the six UK cities that will suffer most from a 'hard' Brexit

The study by the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic performance at the London School of Economics found that cities with large high-skilled service sectors, such as business and financial services, are expected to be worst hit by potential tariff changes.

"This research shows that focusing on the likely local economic impacts of Brexit will be a critical ingredient for policymakers when thinking about how to offset the negative economic effects that loss of trade due to Brexit will bring," said Stephen Machin, from the Centre for Economic Performance.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
City AM - These are the six UK cities that will suffer most from a 'hard' Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

Click Lancashire: Aberdeen will be hit hardest by Brexit deals

Smaller cities Crawley and Barnsley are predicted to have the lowest downturn in economic output of either a "hard" or "soft" Brexit, alongside cities like Hull and Wakefield. A new report today named Aberdeen as the United Kingdom city predicted to be the worst-hit by a so-called hard Brexit.

 

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Click Lancashire - Aberdeen will be hit hardest by Brexit deals

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

Newburgh Gazette (Illinois, USA): Aberdeen and Edinburgh ‘to be hit hardest by Brexit'

Aberdeen and Edinburgh are the cities set to take the biggest financial hit when the United Kingdom leaves the European Union, according to a think tank that predicts a downturn in trade even if ministers strike a “soft Brexit” deal. A new report from the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, said all cities would see a fall in output due to increasing trade costs. Cities such as London, Aberdeen and Edinburgh voted against Brexit in last June’s referendum, the report pointed out.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Newburgh Gazette (Illinois, USA) - Aberdeen and Edinburgh ‘to be hit hardest by Brexit'

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

Energy Voice: Brexit's impact on Aberdeen ‘not as bad as thought', minister says

The impact of Brexit on Aberdeen’s economy will not be as bad as predicted, according to junior Brexit minister Robin Walker. Mr Walker was responding to a bombshell report from the Centre for Cities, whose analysis showed the Granite City’s economy would take the hardest hit in the UK from leaving the EU. The Conservative will visit Aberdeen today to meet oil and gas bosses as well as fishermen and listen to their views on negotiations with the EU.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Energy Voice - Brexit's impact on Aberdeen ‘not as bad as thought', minister says

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

The National (Scotland): Gordon MacIntyre-Kemp: Scotland WILL bear the brunt of Brexit recession

…Evidence again that any form of Brexit will do more damage to Scotland’s farming sector than it will to the UK as a whole. At least the city economies will be OK though? Not a chance. The report from the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, has predicted Aberdeen to suffer the most economic damage of all UK cities from Brexit and placed Edinburgh 6th on the hit list.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The National (Scotland) - Gordon MacIntyre-Kemp: Scotland WILL bear the brunt of Brexit recession

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

Aberdeen Evening Express: Aberdeen's politicians and businesses remain upbeat despite prediction City will suffer most from Brexit

Aberdeen can rise to the challenge of finding news ways to boost the economy, politicians and industry leaders said today. The confident comments come despite a report yesterday that predicts Brexit will hit Aberdeen’s economy the hardest of any UK city. Written by the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School Economics, the report predicts Aberdeen’s economic output will shrink by up to 3.7%. Centre for Cities chief executive Andrew Carter said: “The challenge for Aberdeen will be to diversify its industrial structure in the years ahead, so that it is less reliant on one sector (oil and gas). “This will be crucial for the city to thrive after we leave the EU.” Aberdeen City Council leader, Cllr Jenny Laing, admitted there were “huge challenges” ahead, but said positive strides are being taken.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Aberdeen Evening Express - Aberdeen's politicians and businesses remain upbeat despite prediction City will suffer most from Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

Shropshire Star: Telford less likely to be hit by hard Brexit than other UK towns and cities

Telford will be among the UK towns least-affected by a hard Brexit, a report claims – although economists today denied its suggestion that a lack of skills in the town will cushion the blow.

Researchers at the think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics published the report into the effect of Brexit on local economies.

In it, the think tank claims areas with greater skills bases will also be those that are hit the hardest by withdrawing from access to the European single market.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Shropshire Star - Telford less likely to be hit by hard Brexit than other UK towns and cities

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

Chronicle Live: All areas of North East will be hit by Brexit, new study shows

All areas of the North East would be hit by Brexit and may take longer to recover than other parts of the country, a new study says. The study by the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics predicts that economic output in the North East would be between 1.1% and 1.4% lower in the event of a “soft” brexit , but this would almost double to 2%-2.6% if the Government opts for a “hard” Brexit.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Chronicle Live - All areas of North East will be hit by Brexit, new study shows

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

Business Insider UK: The 6 UK cities that will suffer most from a ‘hard' Brexit

Wealthy Southern cities are predicted to be hardest hit by Brexit, according to a new report. The study, by the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, found that cities with large high-skilled service sectors, such as business and financial services, are expected to be worst hit by potential tariff changes.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Business Insider UK - The 6 UK cities that will suffer most from a ‘hard' Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Friday 28 July 2017

Blackpool Gazette: Resort named in Brexit hit list

A think tank analysed the potential impact of both a “hard” and “soft” Brexit on British cities in the 10 years following the implementation of new trade arrangements with the EU. It is the most prosperous UK cities which will be hit hardest by the downturn ahead, but poorer places across the North and Midlands will find it tougher to adapt.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Blackpool Gazette - Resort named in Brexit hit list

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

Vox: New road infrastructure: The effects on firms


Related Links:
Vox - New road infrastructure: The effects on firms

Steve Gibbons webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Rosa Sanchis-guarner webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

Public Sector Executive: Economy and infrastructure

All cities in the UK are looking set to see a fall in economic output regardless of whether a ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ Brexit is delivered, experts have today warned – but more prosperous regions will be hit harder than others. In findings released by think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, the potential impact of either Brexit ‘type’ on major cities in the UK was analysed for the first time.


Related Links:
Public Sector Executive - Economy and infrastructure

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

STV online: News: Aberdeen ‘will be UK city worst hit by hard Brexit'

London and Edinburgh also ranked in the top ten list compiled by researchers at the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
STV online - News: Aberdeen ‘will be UK city worst hit by hard Brexit'

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

Insider.co.uk: Aberdeen ‘worst affected city in UK if there's a hard Brexit'

Centre for Cities and Centre for Economic Performance analysis also places Edinburgh sixth in a top ten of urban conurbations hit most if the country fails to strike a deal with the EU.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Insider.co.uk - Aberdeen ‘worst affected city in UK if there's a hard Brexit'

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

International Business Times: Revealed: the cities Brexit will hit hardest

Aberdeen will be the hardest hit city in the UK by Brexit, according to a new report on the economic impact of withdrawal from the European Union (EU). Other cities or urban areas such as London, Slough and Edinburgh are in the top ten of a list compiled by researchers at the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
International Business Times - Revealed: the cities Brexit will hit hardest

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

Worthing Herald: Study reveals Worthing will suffer from Brexit

Worthing is among the top ten towns that will suffer the most by Britain’s exit from Europe, according to a study that overturns assumptions that poorer areas of the UK will suffer the most. For the first time, research by the Centre for Cities think-tank and the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics has analysed the likely impact of both hard and soft Brexit in the decade after any trade deal is done with Europe.

Also in:  Littlehampton Gazette, Study reveals Worthing will suffer from Brexit

Related publications:  ‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017;

Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017


Related Links:
Worthing Herald - Study reveals Worthing will suffer from Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

The Planner: Brexit will hit southern UK cities hardest – report

Cities that are successful and have large high-skilled service sectors, mainly located in the south of England, will be hit the hardest by Brexit, whether it is ‘hard’ or ‘soft’. A report by think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics (LSE) also says these cities are better placed to adapt to the economic shocks ahead compared with less affluent places that are less directly affected by Brexit. The report considers the impact both a soft and hard Brexit might have on British cities in the 10 years following new trade arrangements with the EU being implemented. Researchers say a hard Brexit would bring an average reduction of 2.3 per cent in economic input across all UK cities compared with a soft Brexit, which would result in a 1.2 per cent decrease. Whether the UK gets a hard or soft Brexit, the report suggests, cities that are doing economically well – predominantly in the south of England – would be hit the most directly and the hardest.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The Planner - Brexit will hit southern UK cities hardest – report

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

Aberdeen Evening Express: Aberdeen will be hit hardest by Brexit deals

A new report today named Aberdeen as the UK city predicted to be the worst-hit by a so-called hard Brexit. London and Edinburgh also ranked in the top 10 list compiled by researchers at the think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics. They analysed the potential impact of both a “hard” and “soft” Brexit on British cities in the 10 years following the implementation of new trade deals with the EU.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Aberdeen Evening Express - Aberdeen will be hit hardest by Brexit deals

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

Commonspace: Brexit will hit Aberdeen harder than any other city in UK, report says

Research done by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics and the Centre for Cities predicted an economic downturn of 3.7 per cent for Aberdeen and 2.7 per cent in Edinburgh in the event of a hard Brexit. For a soft Brexit, the report expects the drop off to be 2.1 per cent for Aberdeen and 1.4 per cent in Edinburgh.

 

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Commonspace - Brexit will hit Aberdeen harder than any other city in UK, report says

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

Bristol Post: Bristol to be one of the UK's cities worst hit by Brexit

The joint Centre for Cities and Centre for Economic Performance study predicts that Bristol’s economic output will decrease by up to 2.6 per cent – the 11th worst-hit city in the country. However, the report also states that Bristol will be well equipped to weather the downturn, due to its skilled and adaptable workforce. Published today, the report compares the fall in economic output of 63 cities across the UK depending on whether central government opts for a ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ Brexit.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Bristol Post - Bristol to be one of the UK's cities worst hit by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

Bloomberg Politics: Here are the places in the UK that will be hit hardest by Brexit

Brexit will hit Scottish oil capital Aberdeen the hardest of all Britain’s cities, with London also ranking highly and facing a medium-term blow to economic output of as much as 2.6 percent, academics at the London School of Economics said. The researchers estimated that output in U.K. cities -- using a measure called gross value added -- will decline 2.3 percent on average, assuming a hard Brexit in which Britain trades with the European Union under World Trade Organization rules and tariffs. The drop under a soft Brexit, with a negotiated zero-tariff free-trade area but an increase in border controls and customs checks, was projected to be 1.2 percent lower.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Bloomberg Politics - Here are the places in the UK that will be hit hardest by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

LSE EUROPP (European Politics and Policy) blog: CEP study: the UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

The LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (working with the Centre for Cities think tank) has carried out a study shedding light upon the local economic impact of Brexit. Henry G. Overman writes that it is the richer cities, predominantly in the south of England, that will be hit hardest by Brexit, with this effect particularly apparent in areas specialised in services.

Our research (with Swati Dhingra and Stephen Machin) looks at the difference in predicted effects across all Local Authority Areas and across Primary Urban Areas under a ‘soft’ and a ‘hard’ Brexit scenario (the former involves zero tariffs, but increased non-tariff barriers with the EU, the latter involves non-zero tariffs and even higher non-tariff barriers). It also provides some initial analysis on whether these predicted impacts are likely to exacerbate or alleviate existing disparities, and looks at how the predicted economic impacts of Brexit correlate with voting patterns from the referendum.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
LSE EUROPP (European Politics and Policy) blog - CEP study: the UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

BBC Wiltshire : (06:01:57)

Snippet: News that Swindon could be one of the cities worst hit by Brexit
Click to open

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

The Scottish Sun: BREX HIT New report names Aberdeen as UK city predicted to be worst-hit by so-called hard Brexit

A NEW report has named Aberdeen as the UK city predicted to be the worst-hit by a so-called hard Brexit. Edinburgh also ranked in the top 10 list compiled by researchers at the think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The Scottish Sun - BREX HIT New report names Aberdeen as UK city predicted to be worst-hit by so-called hard Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

i paper: New study finds towns in South hit worst after Brexit

Towns and cities in the South of England will be hit hardest by Britain’s exit from Europe, according to a study that overturns assumptions that poorer areas of the UK will suffer the most. Researchers at the Centre for Cities think-tank and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics found that all British cities are set to see a drop in economic output, regardless of whether the Brexit deal is “hard” or “soft”, because of the predicted rise in the costs of trade.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
i paper - New study finds towns in South hit worst after Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

The Times (Scotland): Aberdeen and Edinburgh ‘to be hit hardest by Brexit'

Aberdeen and Edinburgh are the cities set to take the biggest financial hit when the UK leaves the European Union, according to a think tank that predicts a downturn in trade even if ministers strike a “soft Brexit” deal.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The Times (Scotland) - Aberdeen and Edinburgh ‘to be hit hardest by Brexit'

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

SERC blog: The local economic impacts of Brexit

Article by Henry Overman

I've been working with colleagues at the Centre for Economic Performance (Swati Dhingra and Steve Machin) and the Centre for Cities (Naomi Clayton) to take a first look at the local economic impacts of Brexit. You can read the more technical CEP piece here and the less technical CfC piece here. The research looks at the difference in predicted effects across all Local Authority Areas and across Primary Urban Areas under a 'soft' and a 'hard' Brexit scenario (the former involves zero tariffs, but increased non-tariff barriers with the EU, the latter involves non-zero tariffs and even higher non-tariff barriers). It also provides some initial analysis on whether these predicted impacts are likely to exacerbate or alleviate existing disparities and looks at how the predicted economic impacts of Brexit correlate with voting patterns from the referendum.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017.

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017.

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
SERC blog - The local economic impacts of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 27 July 2017

BBC News: Aberdeen ‘worst hit' by hard Brexit, experts predict

Aberdeen could be the city worst hit by falling economic output due to a "hard" Brexit, experts have predicted.

A new report from the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, said all cities would see a fall in output due to increasing trade costs. Aberdeen and Edinburgh were both ranked among the ten most affected cities. However the study said both cities are also among the best-placed to respond to any predicted economic turbulence.


Related Links:
BBC News - Aberdeen ‘worst hit' by hard Brexit, experts predict

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



Wednesday 26 July 2017

Daily Mail: Those Brexit scare stories debunked – House prices could crash

Paul Cheshire, Professor of Economic Geography at the LSE, says house prices could crash by 40 percent. His colleague Christian Hilber explains: ‘If Brexit leads to a recession and/or sluggish growth for extended periods, then an extended and severe downturn is more likely than a short-lived and mild one.’


Related Links:
Daily Mail - Those Brexit scare stories debunked – House prices could crash

Paul Cheshire webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



Friday 21 July 2017

LSE News: ‘People may be overpaying for lease extensions says LSE research'

Dr Ted Pinchbeck, a Fellow in Real Estate Economics and Finance at LSE and one of the authors of the research, said: “Prices of leaseholds of different lengths provide direct new evidence on how people discount the very far future. Our results support the use of a time-declining discount rate, which is used for policy evaluation here in the UK, but not everywhere in the world. This kind of discount rate implies that people are actually willing to pay more or take action now to improve things in the distant future.

Related publications

‘The Time Value of Housing: Historical Evidence on Discount Rates,’ Economic Journal     Philippe Bracke, Edward W. Pinchbeck, James Wyatt. A copy of this paper is available from the LSE press office.


Related Links:
LSE News - ‘People may be overpaying for lease extensions says LSE research'

Edward Pinchbeck webpage



Friday 21 July 2017

Independent: Leasehold homeowners are ‘overpaying to extend' leases

Homeowners living in leasehold properties are being asked to pay extortionate prices to extend the leases on their homes. That’s the conclusion of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), which has analysed data from 8,000 sales of leasehold properties showing how the sale price varied depending on how much time was left on the lease.

Related publications

‘The Time Value of Housing: Historical Evidence on Discount Rates,’ Economic Journal. Philippe Bracke, Edward W. Pinchbeck, James Wyatt. A copy of this paper is available from the LSE press office.


Related Links:
Independent - Leasehold homeowners are ‘overpaying to extend' leases

Edward Pinchbeck webpage



Wednesday 19 July 2017

Share Radio : [19:05:04]

Reference to Paul Cheshire on possible house price collapse.

Click to open


Related Links:
Paul Cheshire webpage



Wednesday 19 July 2017

Business Live (South Africa): Is London's housing bull run coming to an end?

Bloomberg News asked seven market commentators to predict what they expected next in London’s £1.6-trillion housing market.

Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics and Political Science: "The turning point is just being reached. Housing prices have continued to rise relative to incomes and the affordability ratio is now at an all-time low. Real incomes are falling as the weakness in the pound feeds through to higher inflation.

Also in:

The Edge Markets

London’s home price growth has flatlined. What happens next?

http://www.theedgemarkets.com/article/londons-home-price-growth-has-flatlined-what-happens-next


Related Links:
Business Live (South Africa) - Is London's housing bull run coming to an end?

Paul Cheshire webpage



Tuesday 18 July 2017

Share Radio: [19:05]

Discussion on possible housing crash – mention of Paul Cheshire.

Click to open


Related Links:
Paul Cheshire webpage



Friday 14 July 2017

Estate Agent Today: London's prime housing market is no longer roaring

Brexit and higher tax has had a particularly negative impact on the market in well-heeled inner London areas, some of which have seen prices fall sharply over the past 18 months or so, as they absorb the stamp duty increases, and could yet drop further, with Professor Christian Hilber from the London School of Economics warning earlier this month that a recession induced by Brexit could lead to a severe downturn in house prices. Hilber’s view is shared by Professor Paul Cheshire, who has advised the government on housing policy, and predicts that “we are due a significant correction in house prices”.


Related Links:
Estate Agent Today - London's prime housing market is no longer roaring

Christian Hilber webpage

Paul Cheshire webpage



Friday 14 July 2017

The Times: Why the housing market is on a go-slow What about the forecast of a 40 per cent decline in prices?

Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, says that a house price correction, or significant fall in prices, is likely within the next two or three years. This is partly because house prices have risen so far beyond average incomes, while “real” incomes, which take inflation into account, have begun to stagnate. He says: “With Brexit, where you have foreign exchange risk as well as an asset price risk, if house prices start to fall, London real estate may be seen as a less attractive place to park money.” Although Cheshire was reported as predicting a 40 per cent fall, he says this is unlikely and expects positive house price growth over the next 15 years.

 


Related Links:
The Times - Why the housing market is on a go-slow What about the forecast of a 40 per cent decline in prices?

Paul Cheshire webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



Wednesday 12 July 2017

Financial Times: The secret of Singapore's development master plan

Letter from Edwin Loo, Singapore

Singapore is one of only a few jurisdictions in the world to have successfully implemented a comprehensive system of land value capture through betterment taxes and revenues from the sale of government-owned land. The revenues from this system have worked to create a virtuous cycle where development helps to pay for itself by unlocking the funds necessary to bring forward the infrastructure needed to support further development.  Professor Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics has rightly observed in his response to the recent Housing White Paper, the UK desperately needs a rules-based system similar to Singapore’s Master Plan that provides clarity and certainty.


Related Links:
Financial Times - The secret of Singapore's development master plan

Paul Cheshire webpage



Tuesday 11 July 2017

LSE News: People may be overpaying for lease extensions says LSE research

People may be paying too high a price to extend the leases on their homes according to new research from the LSE. The research, forthcoming in The Economic Journal(1), suggests that current leasehold extension practices underestimate the value of many leasehold properties.  Dr Ted Pinchbeck, a Fellow in Real Estate Economics and Finance at LSE and one of the authors of the research, said: “Prices of leaseholds of different lengths provide direct new evidence on how people discount the very far future. Our results support the use of a time-declining discount rate, which is used for policy evaluation here in the UK, but not everywhere in the world. This kind of discount rate implies that people are actually willing to pay more or take action now to improve things in the distant future.

 

Related publications

‘The Time Value of Housing: Historical Evidence from London Residential Leases’, Philippe Bracke, Ted Pinchbeck and James Wyatt, SERC Discussion Paper No.168, December 2014

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/serc/publications/download/sercdp0168.pdf

'The Time Value of Housing: Historical Evidence on Discount Rates', Philippe Bracke, Ted Pinchbeck and James Wyatt, The Economic Journal, 21 March 2017

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ecoj.12501/epdf


Related Links:
LSE News - People may be overpaying for lease extensions says LSE research

Philippe Bracke webpage

Edward Pinchbeck webpage



Sunday 09 July 2017

BBC Radio 4 : (21:17:57)

Snippet: ... signs of faltering market with a slight drop in house prices month on month quarter-on-quarter but they're still up on a year ago a man quoted in many areas house prices crash stories was Professor Paul Cheshire of the LSE he wasn't too pleased how his words had been used...

Click to open


Related Links:
Paul Cheshire webpage



Sunday 09 July 2017

This is Money.co.uk: Homes on the brink: In the wake of dire warning on house market, fresh data shows prices slipping

Professor Paul Cheshire, who has advised the Government on housing policy, said: 'We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting.


Related Links:
This is Money.co.uk - Homes on the brink: In the wake of dire warning on house market, fresh data shows prices slipping

Paul Cheshire webpage



Sunday 09 July 2017

The Metro: House prices slipping in wake of warning about market on verge of collapse

Speaking last week, Paul Cheshire, a former government housing adviser, also warned that the property market could tumble. ‘We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting,’ he said. ‘Historically, trends seem always to start in London and then move out across the rest of the country. In the capital, you are already seeing house prices rising less rapidly than in other parts of Britain.’


Related Links:
The Metro - House prices slipping in wake of warning about market on verge of collapse

Paul Cheshire webpage



Sunday 09 July 2017

The Sun: Fresh fears of housing market collapse as new data suggests property prices are falling

Paul Cheshire, professor of Economic Geography at the London School of Economics, said: “We are due a significant correction in house prices.

“I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting.”


Related Links:
The Sun - Fresh fears of housing market collapse as new data suggests property prices are falling

Paul Cheshire webpage



Sunday 09 July 2017

The Sunday Times: For interest rates the only way is up. Act now to put your house in order

Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, made headlines last weekend by warning that house prices could be heading for “a significant correction” — of perhaps as much as 40%. Other commentators dismissed his claim as sensationalist, however.


Related Links:
The Sunday Times - For interest rates the only way is up. Act now to put your house in order

Paul Cheshire webpage



Sunday 09 July 2017

Mail online: Homes on the brink: in the wake of dire warning on house market, fresh data shows prices slipping

House price data has so far suggested a softening in the market rather than a crash. However, The Mail on Sunday last weekend reported that Britain could be on the brink of a major 1990s-style house price collapse, according to an academic at the London School of Economics. Professor Paul Cheshire, who has advised the Government on housing policy, said: 'We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting.


Related Links:
Mail online - Homes on the brink: in the wake of dire warning on house market, fresh data shows prices slipping

Paul Cheshire webpage



Saturday 08 July 2017

BBC Radio 4: Money Box Programme

Newspaper headlines this week have been shouting about a crash in the housing market. Massive collapse! Property prices could plunge! We hear from the man quoted in many of those stories, Professor Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics, (who is not too pleased with how his thoughts have been represented) about what he thinks does lie ahead for house prices. And from property market analyst Kate Faulkner on the picture across the UK, and the housing bubble you may have missed.


Related Links:
BBC Radio 4 - Money Box Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



Friday 07 July 2017

Building.co.uk: House prices rise 2.6% in past 12 months

Paul Cheshire, emeritus professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, told Building: “There’s likely to be a downward correction of house prices, primarily because of decline in real incomes and the fact that the planning world and indeed the building world tend to act as if what determined demand for housing was household numbers and population.

“But that has quite amazingly little to do with demand, which is mainly determined in the long term by incomes,” he added.


Related Links:
Building.co.uk - House prices rise 2.6% in past 12 months

Paul Cheshire webpage



Thursday 06 July 2017

Property Investor Today: London house prices are ‘vulnerable to an exceptionally painful correction'

Simon French of Panmure Gordon told the newspaper: “These prices are only sustainable in a world of permanently low interest rates and low unemployment. Any sharp correction in either the credit or the labour market has the capital’s housing market vulnerable to an exceptionally painful correction.” Gordon’s views are shared by various economists, including Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, who earlier this week warned that home prices in London “are due a significant correction”.


Related Links:
Property Investor Today - London house prices are ‘vulnerable to an exceptionally painful correction'

Paul Cheshire webpage



Wednesday 05 July 2017

Evening Standard: London house prices rise so fast they outstrip wages

Earlier this week Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, gave a starker warning.  He said: “We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting.”


Related Links:
Evening Standard - London house prices rise so fast they outstrip wages

Paul Cheshire webpage



Wednesday 05 July 2017

The Express: Britain on brink of WORST house price collapse since the 1990s, expert warns

HOUSE prices in Britain are close to a crash that could be as bad as the bust of the early 1990s, according to warnings from a leading economics expert

Paul Cheshire, Professor of Economic Geography at the London School of Economics claims the warning signs are clear, suggesting a plunge of at least 40 per cent. The warnings have led to an increased fear of the return of “negative equity”, in which the value of a property falls so far, it becomes less than the cost of the mortgage.


Related Links:
The Express - Britain on brink of WORST house price collapse since the 1990s, expert warns

The Paradox of the Joneses: Superstar Houses and Mortgage Frenzy in Suburban America

Paul Cheshire webpage



Tuesday 04 July 2017

LBC: [20:50:16]

9 o'clock if you have a health read then you can call us now and takes more calls as well on this issue of people fleeing the NHS but before that Sir rumours are continuing to circulate of the crash in house prices so let's talk to one expert who thinks this time it might actually happen It's Professor Paul Cheshire who's Professor of economic geography at the LSE former government housing adviser as well Professor Cheshire good evening Thank you very much for joining us so room lots of rumours in the last few days about a potential housing crash what's your opinion where I think it's this conditions probably ask for what I call a correction or down turning house prices in London and across England and lonely because of falling real incomes and when you look at what determines the demand for housing...


Related Links:
LBC - [20:50:16]

Paul Cheshire webpage



Tuesday 04 July 2017

Market Oracle: UK House Prices ‘On Brink' Of Massive 40% Collapse

Two leading economics professors have warned that the UK housing market is on the brink of a 40% collapse, echoing the early 1990s property crisis. “We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting” Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics told the Mail on Sunday. The sharp correction or crash may come about due to two primary factors – Brexit and a fall in real wages as they fail to keep pace with rising inflation.

Professor Christian Hilber and former Government housing adviser, and Professor Paul Cheshire warned that Brexit could be a catalyst for the correction which will see thousands of homeowners plunged into negative equity. Hilber warned that the crash will not be short and sharp: “If Brexit leads to a recession and/or sluggish growth for extended periods, then an extended and severe downturn is more likely than a short-lived and mild one.”


Related Links:
Market Oracle - UK House Prices ‘On Brink' Of Massive 40% Collapse

Paul Cheshire webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



Tuesday 04 July 2017

Ham and High: Comment: Could London property be about to blow?

Professor Paul Cheshire predicts London property is long overdue a price correction. But could values really fall 40 per cent and bring about the return of 1990s scale negative equity?


Related Links:
Ham and High - Comment: Could London property be about to blow?

Paul Cheshire webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



Tuesday 04 July 2017

Bullfax.com: UK house prices ‘on brink' of massive 40% collapse

Two leading economics professors have warned that the UK housing market is on the brink of a 40% collapse, echoing the early 1990s property crisis. "We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting” Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics told the Mail on Sunday. The sharp correction or crash may come about due to two primary factors - Brexit and a fall in real wages as they fail to keep pace with rising inflation. Despite these warnings following swiftly on the tail of recent poor housing market data, homeowners seem unfazed by what the future might hold, disregarding the parallels that are being drawn between today and the run up to the 1990s property crash. Brexit deals another blow Professor Christian Hilber and former Government housing adviser, and Professor Paul Cheshire warned that Brexit could be a catalyst for the correction which will see thousands of homeowners plunged into negative equity.


Related Links:
Bullfax.com - UK house prices ‘on brink' of massive 40% collapse

Paul Cheshire webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



Monday 03 July 2017

Cambridge News: Brexit: Lower wages could cause drastic drop in house prices, experts say

Homeowners could see a sharp drop in the value of their houses because of Brexit paired with the wage drop, a London School of Economics professor predicts. Prices could fall almost 40 per cent and even put homeowners at risk of negative equity, meaning their home could be worth less than their mortgage, The Mirror reported. Professor Paul Cheshire, Professor of Economic Geography at LSE, said the property market could take a sharp downturn similar to the crash in the 1990s. He said house price can be affected when earnings drag behind inflation. Last month, inflation hit 2.9 per cent, while incomes grew by 2.1 per cent.


Related Links:
Cambridge News - Brexit: Lower wages could cause drastic drop in house prices, experts say

Paul Cheshire webpage



Monday 03 July 2017

The Times: Warning of severe house price crash

House prices may be on the brink of a severe crash, according to a former government housing adviser. Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, told The Mail on Sunday that the downturn could be severe enough to leave many homeowners in negative equity, with their houses valued at less than the mortgages they had taken out to pay for them.


Related Links:
The Times - Warning of severe house price crash

Paul Cheshire webpage



Sunday 02 July 2017

LBC : News (16:05:01)

Snippet: there are already warning signs that prices are heading toward a near 40% plunge Paul Cheshire Professor of economic geography at the London school of economics while here to debunk...
Click to open


Related Links:
Paul Cheshire webpage



Sunday 02 July 2017

City A.M.: UK house prices: Is a crash coming? These economists thinks so, raising spectre of negative equity

Leading economists have warned that the UK is heading for a collapse in house prices not seen since the early 90s which risks plunging homeowners into negative equity. "We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting," said Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, speaking to the Mail on Sunday and warning that they could fall as much as 40 per cent.


Related Links:
City A.M. - UK house prices: Is a crash coming? These economists thinks so, raising spectre of negative equity

Paul Cheshire webpage



Sunday 02 July 2017

The Mirror: Experts predict house prices could plummet by up to 40 PER CENT due to Brexit and wage drop

House prices could plummet by almost 40 per cent as Britain faces a crash similar to that in the 1990s, a leading professor at the London School of Economics has warned. A possible Brexit -sparked recession coupled with a fall in real earnings, could cause a double blow to homeowners and put them at risk of 'negative equity' - meaning that the value of their home is less than the cost of their mortgage. Professor Paul Cheshire, Professor of Economic Geography at LSE, warned the property market could collapse as prices reflect the decline in earnings.


Related Links:
The Mirror - Experts predict house prices could plummet by up to 40 PER CENT due to Brexit and wage drop

Paul Cheshire webpage



Saturday 01 July 2017

Mail online: Britain on the brink of the worst house price collapse since 1990s': experts predict property costs could plunge by forty per cent

House prices are teetering on the brink of a crash that could be as bad as the bust of the early 1990s, a leading expert has warned. There are already warning signs that prices are heading towards a near 40 per cent plunge, warns Paul Cheshire, Professor of Economic Geography at the London School of Economics. It raises the alarming spectre of the return of ‘negative equity’ – when a house falls so far in value it is worth less than the mortgage – which hit one million people at the worst point in the 1990s. Prof Christian Hilber of the LSE also warned: ‘If Brexit leads to a recession and/or sluggish growth for extended periods, then an extended and severe downturn is more likely than a short-lived and mild one.’


Related Links:
Mail online - Britain on the brink of the worst house price collapse since 1990s': experts predict property costs could plunge by forty per cent

Paul Cheshire webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



Wednesday 14 June 2017

The i Paper: How many young people actually turned out to vote?

Snippet: ... Analysis from the London School of Economics shows that constituents with more young voters experienced marked increases in turnout compared to the 2015 election. Similar analysis has shown that the change in turnout this election is related to  areas with high numbers of graduates.

Related article

‘Who swung GE2017: young voters turning out, or older voters not?’, Thiemo Fetzer, LSE British Politics and Policy blog, June 11, 2017

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/who-swung-ge2017/?utm_content=buffer65f4e&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer


Related Links:
The i Paper - How many young people actually turned out to vote?

Thiemo Fetzer webpage



Friday 09 June 2017

LSE Business Review blog: It's not that London is too big, but that other large UK cities are too small

Article by Henry Overman

The elections are barely behind us now, and we should keep asking the question, ‘What are the economic forces polarising the UK?’ A big part of the story concerns the geographical concentration of economic activity in London (and the South East). Is this concentration good for those who live or work in London but bad for those who don’t? Is the attraction of London creating an economy that is distinct from the rest of the UK? And what are the implications?

Related publications

The UK’s Regional Divide: Can Policy Make a Difference?’, Henry Overman, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA042, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea042.pdf


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - It's not that London is too big, but that other large UK cities are too small

Henry Overman webpage



Tuesday 06 June 2017

Economic Policy Digest – June 2017: Education and deprivation explain the Brexit vote better than immigration

Demography and education are a much better explanation of the ‘Leave’ vote in the June 2016 Brexit referendum than the decline in public services or recent immigration. These are the conclusions of Sascha O. Becker, Thiemo Fetzer and Dennis Novy in their paper Who Voted for Brexit? A Comprehensive District-Level Analysis. … It might be assumed that the 48% of people who voted to remain in the EU last June, and many of the 52% who voted to Leave, would prefer a ‘soft Brexit’ instead.  In this case the UK would follow the example of a country like Norway, which is outside the EU but inside the Single Market. If they got their wish, this would halve the fall in income to about 1.3%. But whether Brexit is hard or soft, Britain will be worse off. The authors of the paper – Swati Dhingra, Hanwei Huang, Gianmarco Ottaviano, João Pessoa, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen – from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, and MIT, found that for both extreme versions of Brexit, as well as many in between cases that they costed, reductions in budget payment to Brussels will be easily outweighed by the costs of reduced trade with the EU, which accounts for about half of all British trade.


Related Links:
Economic Policy Digest – June 2017 - Education and deprivation explain the Brexit vote better than immigration

Who Voted for Brexit? A Comprehensive District-Level Analysis

The Costs and Benefits of Leaving the EU: Trade Effects

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thiemo Fetzer webpage

Hanwei Huang webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

John Van reenen webpage



Monday 05 June 2017

Cinquantamila.it: Londra vota Brexit. Morbida o estrema saremo comunque più poveri

Brexit In fact is a trauma that breaks the vertical chain of production of the value that ties the United Kingdom to the EU, with consequences not apparent immediately. Quantifying these costs is therefore a difficult exercise, but we have tried S. Dhingra, H. Huang, G. Ottaviano, J.P. Pessoa, T. Sampson and J. Van Reenen in the article "the costs and benefits of leaving the EU: trade Effects", forthcoming in the magazine. … The British voters who chose leave, contrary to appearances, seem to know that their problem is not immigration. The analysis of the vote at the last June referendum by S. Becker, T. Fetzer and D. Novy in the article "who voted for Brexit: a comprehensive district-level analysis" (also being published in the economic policy), confirms this conclusion.


Related Links:
Cinquantamila.it - Londra vota Brexit. Morbida o estrema saremo comunque più poveri

Who Voted for Brexit? A Comprehensive District-Level Analysis

The Costs and Benefits of Leaving the EU: Trade Effects

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thiemo Fetzer webpage

Hanwei Huang webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

John Van reenen webpage



Saturday 03 June 2017

Evening Chronicle: The North should become a ‘free trade zone' to create jobs and bring in cash, think tank says

The need to give the North a boost was highlighted by a new study by the Centre for Economic Performance, part of the London School of Economics, which said the Government’s Northern Powerhouse project had produced uneven results, with Manchester benefitting more than other parts of the North. Professor Henry Overman, co-author of the report, said: “The manifestos of the main parties the 2017 election campaign reflect the continuing urge that politicians feel to try to do something about the UK’s regional divide without any real understanding of what drives the differences in performance or what policies might be effective.”


Related Links:
Evening Chronicle - The North should become a ‘free trade zone' to create jobs and bring in cash, think tank says

The UK's Regional Divide: Can Policy Make a Difference

Henry Overman webpage



Thursday 09 March 2017

Journal of Economic Geography : CEP Journal Articles

‘Agglomeration externalities and urban growth controls’, Wouter Vermeulen, Journal of Economic Geography Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2017

http://bit.ly/2n719tK

Related publications

Agglomeration Externalities and Urban Growth Controls Wouter Vermeulen, SERC/Urban and Spatial Programme Discussion Paper No.093, October 2011

Related links

Wouter Vermeulen webpage:  https://www.cpb.nl/medewerkers/wouter-vermeulen

‘Urban renewal after the Berlin Wall: a place-based policy evaluation’, Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Wolfgang Maennig and Felix J. Richter, Journal of Economic Geography Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2017

http://bit.ly/2n7160U

Related links

Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=10268

‘Innovation, SMEs and the liability of distance: the demand and supply of bank funding in UK peripheral regions’, Neil Lee and Ross Brown, Journal of Economic Geography Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2017

http://bit.ly/2mqOC0P

Related links

Neil Lee webpage:  http://www.lse.ac.uk/geographyAndEnvironment/whosWho/staff%20profiles/NLee.aspx

 


Related Links:
Journal of Economic Geography - CEP Journal Articles

Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage



Tuesday 07 March 2017

The Daily Telegraph: Call for statistics to measure quality of economic growth

National figures on economic growth fail to take into account of regional variations and ignore quality of life, such as the gap in life expectancy between Surrey and the north east of England, the Inclusive Growth Commission warned.

Local productivity, local incomes, the distribution of earnings, pay changes for the lowest paid and levels of regional economic inactivity could all form part of this new inclusive growth metric, said the ICG which is chaired by Stephanie Flanders, JP Morgan’s chief market strategist. The Commission also includes former Rolls-Royce chief executive Sir John Rose and London School of Economics professor Henry Overman.


Related Links:
The Daily Telegraph - Call for statistics to measure quality of economic growth

Henry Overman webpage



Monday 06 March 2017

LSE Business Review: The roles of nature and history in world development

A study on how the relative importance of a place’s suitability for agriculture and trade has changed over time, by Vernon Henderson, Tim Squires, Adam Storeygard and David Weil

Related publications

This article summarises ‘The Global Spatial Distribution of Economic Activity: Nature, History and the Role of Trade’ by Vernon Henderson, Tim Squires, Adam Storeygard and David Weil, SERC/Urban and Spatial Programme Discussion Paper No. 198, May 2016

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0198.pdf

 


Related Links:
LSE Business Review - The roles of nature and history in world development

The roles of nature and history in world development

J. Vernon Henderson webpage



Saturday 04 March 2017

CEP Engagement/In politics: CEP and its research had a broad reach in Parliament during the month of February.

During the passage of the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill in the Lords, research on the benefits from immigration at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) was mentioned.

Also, LSE research was picked up during debates on building more homes (Professor Cheshire)

pre-school education: teachers (Dr Jo Blanden, Professor Sandra McNally).

LSE has been particularly involved in the debate on Brexit through its submissions of written evidence in Parliament and academics appearing before select committees. LSE has responded to the Impact of Brexit on Higher Education and the Immigration inquiries.

Swati Dhingra and Professor Niamh Moloney gave their insights on UK Trade Options Beyond 2019

Professor Alan Manning and Philippe Legrain informed the Lords on Brexit and the Labour Market.

Related links

Community Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/Community/default.asp

 

 


Related Links:
Paul Cheshire webpage

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Alan Manning webpage



Saturday 04 March 2017

Yibada (English Chinese News, USA): China's high-speed rail technology game: the significant role of transfer deals

Yatang Lin, a researcher from the Centre for Economic Performance of the London School of Economics, enthused that "there were ambitions to get everything done pretty quickly. Of course, there were political motives there. Therefore, the fastest and safest way was to use foreign technology."


Related Links:
Yibada (English Chinese News, USA) - China's high-speed rail technology game: the significant role of transfer deals

High-speed rail in China

High-speed rail in China

High-speed rail in China



Tuesday 28 February 2017

LSE academic mentioned in Parliament: Building more homes

During the debate on 'Building more homes' in the Economic Affairs Committee, Lord Layard mentioned LSE:

"Professor Cheshire at the London School of Economics has suggested a levy on the final value of a completed development, combining that with the change in presumption that I referred to earlier. There are many areas in which these ideas can be explored. The committee took no view on these issues but it made a clear recommendation that the Government should examine these proposals."

 

Related links

Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=cheshire

Richard Layard webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=970

 


Related Links:
LSE academic mentioned in Parliament - Building more homes

Paul Cheshire webpage

Richard Layard webpage



Tuesday 31 January 2017

Vox: On the spatial distribution of development: the roles of nature and history

Economists point to three factors to explain how population is distributed: geographical characteristics, agglomeration, and history. This column, taken from a new Vox eBook, examines how economic and technological development have changed the ways in which two first-nature characteristics – suitability for growing food and suitability for engaging in trade – impact population distribution. 

This column first appeared as a chapter in the Vox eBook, The Long Economic and Political Shadow of History, Volume 1, available to download here.


Related Links:
Vox - On the spatial distribution of development: the roles of nature and history

J. Vernon Henderson webpage



Tuesday 24 January 2017

El Periodico: Autora de in informe sobre el impacto de las grandes superficies

Maria Sanchez Vidal: "the coexistence between Commerce of proximity and large surfaces trade is possible"

Is author of a study on the effect of the introduction of superstores in respect of a city trade.

Related publications  'Small shops for sale! The effects of big-box openings on grocery stores', Maria Sanchez, SERC & IEB mimeo

 


Related Links:
El Periodico - Autora de in informe sobre el impacto de las grandes superficies

Maria Sánchez-vidal webpage



Wednesday 04 January 2017

The Planner: Housing professionals recognised in New Year's Honours

Paul Cheshire, economist and emeritus professor of economic geography at the LSE, has been awarded a CBE for services to economics and housing.


Related Links:
The Planner - Housing professionals recognised in New Year's Honours

Paul Cheshire webpage



Saturday 31 December 2016

Daily Mirror: New Year's Honours 2017: Full list of great and good awarded for services to Britain

Professor Paul Charles Cheshire. Economist. For services to Economics and Housing. (London)

Professor John Van Reenen. Economist. For services to Economics and Public Policy Making. (Abroad)


Related Links:
Daily Mirror - New Year's Honours 2017: Full list of great and good awarded for services to Britain

Paul Cheshire webpage

John Van reenen webpage



Saturday 31 December 2016

LSE News: New Year Honours at LSE

Paul Cheshire, Emeritus Professor of Economic Geography, was awarded a CBE for Services to Economics and Housing.

In 2004 Professor Cheshire won the Royal Economic Society's Prize for the best paper in the Economic Journal and won the European Regional Science Association/European investment Banks prize for lifetime contribution to regional science research in 2009. He is an elected Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences and of the Weimer School.

Aside from his academic work he has spent time as an advisor and as a consultant for the European Commission, the World Bank, the OECD, the UN and other international organisations as well as the UK government, including being a member of the Expert Panel for the Barker Review of the Planning system.

Also receiving an honour was long-serving former member of LSE staff, Professor John Van Reenen, awarded an OBE for services to economics and pubic policy making. Until summer 2016 Professor Van Renen was Director of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (CEP). He is currently Professor of Applied Economics at MIT and remains an associate at CEP.


Related Links:
LSE News - New Year Honours at LSE

Brexit: the final assessment

Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning

Paul Cheshire webpage

John Van reenen webpage



Friday 30 December 2016

Guardian: Housing leaders recognised in New Year Honours list

Five housing executives and a professor of economics and housing policy have been awarded medals in the New Year honours list.

Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, receives a CBE for services to economics and housing. Cheshire has written extensively on planning issues, land use and regulation, and mixed communities.


Related Links:
Guardian - Housing leaders recognised in New Year Honours list

Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning

Paul Cheshire webpage



Friday 30 December 2016

The Daily Telegraph: Former PWC boss knighted in New Year's Honours

Professor John Van Reenen, who predicted ahead of the referendum that Brexit would cost up to £1,700 per household per year, has been given an OBE for services to economics and public policy making. Other academics to receive honours include Professor Paul Cheshire, who has argued that the green belt should be opened up to ease the housing crisis. He will receive a CBE in the honours, which are recognising 1,197 people in total.


Related Links:
The Daily Telegraph - Former PWC boss knighted in New Year's Honours

BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance

Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning

Paul Cheshire webpage

John Van reenen webpage



Friday 30 December 2016

Bloomberg: Tennis No. 1 Murray, Kinks frontman knighted in UK Honors List

A total of 1,197 people, representing “the very best of our nation,” were granted awards, according to a statement from the Cabinet Office. Just over half are women, 9.3 percent are from ethnic minorities, and 8.5 percent have some form of disability, making the list “the most diverse ever,” it said.

Other notable awards include:

CBE for London School of Economics professor Paul Cheshire.

OBE for and MIT economics professor John Van Reenen


Related Links:
Bloomberg - Tennis No. 1 Murray, Kinks frontman knighted in UK Honors List

Paul Cheshire webpage

John Van reenen webpage



Friday 16 December 2016

LSE Business Review blog: Fear of fracking affects house prices in the UK

Shale gas offers the prospect of a low-cost energy future, but invokes fears of environmental catastrophe, write Stephen Gibbons, Stephan Heblich, Esther Lho and Christopher Timmins


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - Fear of fracking affects house prices in the UK

In brief... Fear of fracking: the impact on UK house prices



Friday 02 December 2016

The Daily Telegraph: Half measures won't solve the housing crisis

Paul Cheshire, Professor of Economic Geography at the London School of Economics is a longstanding critic of Britain’s byzantine planning system.

[No link]


Related Links:
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning

Paul Cheshire webpage



Monday 14 November 2016

BBC Radio 4: Evening programme

Martin Knapp is here. Professor of social policy at .. depression, anxiety, bullies themselves never seem to be affected. Professor thank you very much we’ve had a lot of emails on this…

The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4 on November 14, 2016
Link to the interview here

Related publication

Childhood bullying victimization is associated with use of mental health services over five decades: a longitudinal nationally representative cohort study, S. Evans-Lacko, R. Takizawa, No. Brimblecombe, D. King, M. Knapp, B. Maugham and L. Arsenault, Psychological Medicine, first view, Kenneth S. Kendler and Robin M. Murray (Eds), November 2016


Related Links:
BBC Radio 4 - Evening programme

Martin Knapp webpage

Sara Evans-lacko webpage



Tuesday 01 November 2016

The National (Scotland): Letters II: Trump's destruction of a priceless treasure is his Scottish legacy

Trump’s true legacy will be that of rural vandalism on a colossal scale. A unique wilderness at Menie destroyed for a golf course. This was a site of Special Scientific Interest, the highest environmental accolade. A dynamic dune system, wetlands, trees and shrubs gone forever.

 

Opposition to the destruction of this priceless landscape came from the RSPB, SEPA, SNH, Ramblers Association and the SWT. No credible environmental organisation supported Trump. Add to this the harassment of local residents, heavy handed policing and the challenges made to our planning regulations. Martin Ford, Scottish Green Party councillor, correctly made the point that Trump “has in turn either bullied or ignored the Scottish planning system”.

 

The economic benefits were also vastly overestimated. The Scottish Government was duped by the estimates given in the economic impact study. Incredibly, this document, a well-crafted piece of sophistry, was not scrutinised properly by the Scottish Government. In 2008, Alex Salmond said that “we can see the social and economic benefits: 6000 jobs across Scotland, 1400 local and permanent jobs here in the north east of Scotland that outweighs the environmental concerns”. At the time, Professor Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics questioned the number of local jobs that would be created. This has become all too true. No golf “resort” was ever built, nor, thankfully, the second golf course. The 450-bedroom hotel and 1500 houses have also not appeared.


Related Links:
The National (Scotland) - Letters II: Trump's destruction of a priceless treasure is his Scottish legacy

Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning

Paul Cheshire webpage



Wednesday 19 October 2016

The Conversation: Why do wind farms drag down house prices in some places but not others?

Two years ago, the London School of Economics delivered bad news to the renewables industry. It published a research paper that showed that house price appreciation was significantly reduced by being near wind farms in England and Wales. This overturned previous work in both the US and UK which had found no robust evidence of a negative effect.

This article was published online by The Conversation on October 19, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices, Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014
Gone with the Wind, Stephen Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Urban and Spatial Programme webpage



Tuesday 18 October 2016

The Guardian: Theresa May given stark warning about leaving customs union

The studies, by the Treasury, the thinktank NIESR and the Centre for Economic Performance and London School of Economics, predicted the effect on the British economy if the UK was to opt for a Norway-style model. That would involve remaining inside the single market but outside the customs union, within which countries set common external tariffs and so do not require customs checks.

This article was published by the Guardian on October 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
June 20, 2016
CEP, NIESR and IFS blog
Leaving the EU would almost certainly damage our economic prospects
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Holger Breinlich webpage
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Tuesday 18 October 2016

LSE Business Review blog: New immigrants don't affect the job prospects of UK-born workers

New arrivals flock to the occupations and industries in which existing immigrants work, argues Barbara Petrongolo.
Most economists would argue that there is not much of a trade-off involved in this choice. The EU is the UK's largest trade partner (accounting for about half of UK trade flows) and losing access to the Single Market would inevitably damage the UK economy. Dhingra et al (2016a) calculate that in an optimistic scenario in which the UK remains a member of the EEA, it would suffer a 1.3% decline in GDP per head, mostly resulting from the impact of non-tariff trade barriers on trade flows.
But in a pessimistic scenario in which the UK leaves the EEA and trade between the UK and the EU is governed by World Trade Organization rules, the higher increase in trade costs would induce a fall in GDP per head of about 2.6%. To be added to this is the resulting fall in foreign direct investment, which is estimated to produce an even stronger decline in UK GDP than the increase in trade costs (Dhingra et al, 2016b).
Is it economically worthwhile to bear these costs in order to retain controls on immigration flows from the EU? EU immigration has represented the bulk of the recent growth in the share of foreign-born population in the UK, especially after the EU enlargement of 2004, and EU nationals have entered - to varying degrees - all sectors of the UK economy.

This article was published by the LSE Business Review blog on October 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit Beckons: Thinking ahead, VoxEU ebook by leading economists including Barbara Petrongolo. See Chapter 14: 'Brexit and labour markets'
Brexit and the UK Labour Market, Barbara Petrongolo. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 21, Issue 2, Autumn 2016

Related links
Barbara Petrongolo webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Barbara Petrongolo CEP publications webpage



Monday 17 October 2016

Migration Matters: Do migrants take away jobs?

Part 2/6 from six impossible ideas (after Brexit)
Many people think that migrants take jobs away from citizens, reduce wages or both. But you may also have heard the argument that immigrants benefit the economy because they take risks and start businesses. So, who's right?
We took this question to Alan Manning, Professor of Economics at LSE. In three short videos, Alan explains how migration affects your job prospects, presents the data from the UK and the world, and gives insights on managing migration in light of this evidence.

The episode of Migration Matters was posted on October 17, 2016
Link to the article and films here

Related publications
Recommended reading: Immigration and the UK Labour Market, Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, Paper No.19, February 2015

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Alan Manning CEP publications webpage



Friday 14 October 2016

The Independent: Brexit: UK faces £350m-a-week ‘divorce bill' as result of leaving the EU

Economist Thomas Sampson told The Independent: ''It's important to remember that the exit bill would be a one-off payment and in the longer run it is likely to be dwarfed by the broader economic costs resulting from reduced integration with EU markets, particularly if the government pursues a hard Brexit.''

This article was published by The Independent on October 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit: the impact on UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 1, Summer 2016
The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards, CEP Brexit Analysis No. 2 by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, March 2016

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Saturday 01 October 2016

The Economist: Free exchange: Down to earth

Brexiteers need to respect gravity models of international trade
Furthermore, according to Swati Dhingra of the London School of Economics, gravity models do a good job of predicting actual trading relationships today.

This article was published in The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage



Saturday 24 September 2016

Vox: Distinctively different: a new approach to valuing architectural amenities

Article by Gabriel Ahlfeldt and Nancy Holman
Good architectural design is a public good, but economists and policymakers lack robust evidence on the impact of well designed architecture on location value when planning spaces. This column verifies the worth of preserving and designing good architectural spaces by analysing the changes in property prices across conservation and non-conservation areas in England. It finds that good design in buildings has a substantial positive impact on location value.

This article was published online by Vox on September 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Distinctively Different: A New Approach to Valuing Architectural Amenities, Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt and Nancy Holman, SERC/Urban Programme Discussion Paper No.171, February 2015

Related links
Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Saturday 24 September 2016

The Economist: Little Londons

However, land regulation may play a bigger role. According to a recent paper by Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen of the London School of Economics, alongside Greater London, scarcity of open, developable land is greatest in and around Birmingham and Manchester.

This article was published in The Economist on September 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, Christian A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, SERC/Urban Programme Discussion Paper No.119, September 2012

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 22 September 2016

Handelsblatt: Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 22 September 2016

Handelsblatt: Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 22 September 2016

Handelsblatt: Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 22 September 2016

Handelsblatt: Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Friday 26 August 2016

Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway): Do we need more goals for society than economic growth?

Therefore, among others, economics professor Richard Layard of the London School of Economics urged to measure citizens' quality of life. OECD har i den såkalte «Bedre liv-indeksen» utarbeidet indikatorer på en rekke områder fra sysselsetting og bolig til frivillig aktivitetsliv og miljø, for å forsøke å måle livskvalitet i ulike land. OECD in the so-called "better life index" compiled indicators on a range of areas from employment and housing to volunteer aktivitetsliv and environment, in an attempt to measure quality of life in different countries. KrF fremmet forslag i Stortinget i 2009 om at også Norge burde gjøre dette. KrF proposed in Parliament in 2009 that also Norway should do this. Dette har resultert i en omtale av livskvalitetsindikatorer i Nasjonalbudsjettet. This has resulted in a review of quality of life indicators in the National Budget.

This article appeared on Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway) on 26 August 2016 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Friday 26 August 2016

Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway): Do we need more goals for society than economic growth?

Therefore, among others, economics professor Richard Layard of the London School of Economics urged to measure citizens' quality of life. OECD har i den såkalte «Bedre liv-indeksen» utarbeidet indikatorer på en rekke områder fra sysselsetting og bolig til frivillig aktivitetsliv og miljø, for å forsøke å måle livskvalitet i ulike land. OECD in the so-called "better life index" compiled indicators on a range of areas from employment and housing to volunteer aktivitetsliv and environment, in an attempt to measure quality of life in different countries. KrF fremmet forslag i Stortinget i 2009 om at også Norge burde gjøre dette. KrF proposed in Parliament in 2009 that also Norway should do this. Dette har resultert i en omtale av livskvalitetsindikatorer i Nasjonalbudsjettet. This has resulted in a review of quality of life indicators in the National Budget.

This article appeared on Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway) on 26 August 2016 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Thursday 18 August 2016

Press Reader: ONS hires former MPC member for its experts panel

Britain's statistics office has recruited a group of economic heavyweights to boost its ability to crunch numbers on the health of the economy. ... Three economics professor have also been recruited to the working group: Thomas Crossley from the University of Essex, Peter Sinclair at the University of Birmingham and David Metcalf at the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by the Press Reader on August 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
David Metcalf CEP publications webpage



Wednesday 17 August 2016

PropertyWire: Researcher blames government not rich foreign buyers for UK housing crisis

Decades of planning policies that constrain the supply of houses and land and turn them into something like gold or artworks is to blame for the current housing crisis in the UK rather than foreign buyers, according to a new analysis. The problem is not foreign speculators buying luxury flats as an investment in London which then lie empty but that for more than 30 years not enough homes have been built, says Paul Cheshire, Professor Emeritus of economic geography at the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by PropertyWire on August 17, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Wednesday 17 August 2016

PropertyWire: Researcher blames government not rich foreign buyers for UK housing crisis

Decades of planning policies that constrain the supply of houses and land and turn them into something like gold or artworks is to blame for the current housing crisis in the UK rather than foreign buyers, according to a new analysis. The problem is not foreign speculators buying luxury flats as an investment in London which then lie empty but that for more than 30 years not enough homes have been built, says Paul Cheshire, Professor Emeritus of economic geography at the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by PropertyWire on August 17, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Tuesday 16 August 2016

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam): Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Tuesday 16 August 2016

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam): Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Tuesday 16 August 2016

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam): Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Tuesday 16 August 2016

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam): Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Wednesday 10 August 2016

BBC Radio 4: Paul Cheshire interview

Paul Cheshire argues that golf courses capitalise on green belt planning laws which keep down land prices and contribute to a housing shortage.

The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4 on August 10, 2016
Link to the interview herer

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014 Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Wednesday 03 August 2016

Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) blog: Reflections on the employer support for higher level skills report

Article by John Denham
For the past 20 years and longer, Ministers of all parties have wanted to see more employers support employees and apprentices to gain higher levels skills and higher education. With strong bi-partisan support in a relatively non-ideological area of policy it seems odd that employer supported higher skills have not become a more important part of the skills and education system. In a recent short project for the Institute of Public Affairs I wanted to examine why public policy had apparently failed. I have an interest: I was Secretary of State at the Department for Innovation and Skills from 2007 to 2009 and, more recently, had proposed radical reforms to higher education finance that depended heavily on the expansion of employer supported degrees.

This article was published on the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) blog on August 3, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
In full: Employer Support for Higher Level Skills Report
CVER website



Tuesday 02 August 2016

SchoolDash blog: Poverty of opportunity?

Education is not just a vital cornerstone of our culture and economy, it is also potentially one of the great social levellers. However rich or poor our parents, however supportive or dysfunctional our families, a high-quality education ought to give each of us the opportunity to live a fulfilling life limited only by our own talents and efforts rather than by the circumstances of our birth. Or so the theory goes. In this post we look at the question of economic deprivation among children, and in particular how different types of schools either enable or hinder opportunities for those from poorer families. ... The rest of this post looks at these trends in more detail. You may also be interested to see other related work such as the Sutton Trust's recent analysis of social selection in primary schools, Ofsted's 2013 report on underachievement among poor pupils, and the LSE's 2012 research into the effects of schools on house prices.

This article was published online by the SchoolDash blog on August 2, 2016
Link to article here

CEP research on Twitter
Lilian Greenwood @LilianGreenwood (Labour MP for Nottingham)
RT @emranmian: On grammar schools and social mobility ... @SchoolDash work from last week is pretty damning

Related publications
The link between schools and house prices is now an established fact, Stephen Gibbons, LSE British Politics and Policy blog, September 25, 2012
Big ideas: valuing schooling through house prices, Stephen Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012
Houses and Schools: Valuation of School Quality through the Housing Market, EALE 2010 Pressidential Address, Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Monday 01 August 2016

Vox: Brexit Beckons: Thinking ahead by leading economists

The June 2016 Brexit referendum saw British voters reject membership of the European Union. Now that a decision has been made, it is time to look forward and find the best solutions for the future of both the UK and the EU. This VoxEU eBook regroups the views of more than a dozen leading economists and specialists on a broad range of issues, from various perspectives.

Trade policy and the City

5. The UK's new trade priorities
Angus Armstrong

6. UK-EU relations after Brexit: What is best for the UK economy?
Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson

This article was published by Vox on 1 August 2016
Link to article here

Related articles
Vox on August 1, 2016
A new eBook: Brexit beckons
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Series Paper No.01, February 2016
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.
Brexit and Wage Inequality, Brian Bell and Stephen Machin, CEP Brexit Blog, July 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage

Brian Bell webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Stephen Machin webpage
Barbara Petrongolo webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Saturday 16 July 2016

Admin5.com (China): Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms
That is to say, technical parts of the economy made great contribution to productivity growth. In 2015 a 17-country study found that between 1993 and 2007, average annual GDP growth rate of the robot industry for these countries has contributed 0.4%, this time the national GDP growth rate of more than one-tenth (Graetz and Michaels 2015).

This article was published online by Admin5.com (China) on July 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Wednesday 13 July 2016

Business Day Live: Are economists at fault for Brexit?

John van Reenen, the outgoing director of the London School of Economics’s Centre for Economic Performance, doesn’t think the profession should be too down on itself. Had economists engaged more "in my frank view, it would not have made a jot of difference".

This article appeared in Business Day Live on 13 July. Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth webpage

Tuesday 12 July 2016

Tim Harford - The Undercover Economist blog: Did economists fail us over Brexit?

You may have heard the jokes about economists equivocating and squabbling. Ronald Reagan had the best one, about an edition of Trivial Pursuit designed for economists: ''There are 100 questions, 3,000 answers.''

John Van Reenen, the outgoing director of the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, doesn't think the profession should be too down on itself. ''I'm proud of what we did'', he says, and had economists engaged more ''in my frank view, it would not have made a jot of difference.'' Van Reenen has a point; there is a limit to how much experts can achieve by simply presenting the facts.

This article was published online via Tim Harford - The Undercover Economist blog on July 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of papers published in the CEP Brexit Analysis Series can be seen herer

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Friday 08 July 2016

CVER News: CVER Discussion Paper Published

Post-16 education and training is still socially and academically divided, research shows
Thousands of 16 year-olds are stuck in an educational ‘revolving door,’ returning year after year to study low-level qualifications.
And apprenticeships are still failing to attract sufficient numbers of better-off, better-qualified applicants, according to research published today from the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) at the London School of Economics.

"Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications" by C. Hupkau, S. McNally, J. Ruiz-Valenzuela, and G. Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper 001

Thursday 07 July 2016

Independent.IE (Ireland): Capital needs cheaper homes, not higher debts

There is another house price bubble under way in the Dublin area. Notwithstanding the efforts by the Central Bank to keep mortgage credit under control, some extraordinary prices have been quoted recently for the small parcels of land that become available. ...
Two researchers at the London School of Economics, Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, have just released a paper in The Economic Journal looking at the development of house prices in the United Kingdom in recent decades and the role played by planning restrictions.

This article was re-published online by the Independent.ie (Ireland) on July 7, 2016. It was originally published on 17/04/2016.
Link to article here

Related article
April 10, 2016
Vox
Regulation is to blame for England's surge in house prices, Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen

Related publications
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, C. A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, Economic Journal 126(591): 358–405, March 2016.
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, Christian A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, Urban Programme [SERC] Discussion Paper No.119, September 2012

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Wednesday 06 July 2016

Planning and Building Control Today: The UK planning system - fit for purpose?

Article by Christian Hilber
In the first of a two-part article discussing the British planning system, Christian Hilber, Associate Professor of Economic Geography at the London School of Economics, argues that the UK planning system has serious flaws and delivers benefits only at excessively high costs, mainly hurting the young.

There is no denial: the UK faces a serious housing affordability crisis. This crisis is not a short-term phenomenon, nor the result of a financial bubble. The crisis has been brewing for several decades. Over the last 45 years, house price growth in the UK has been faster in real terms than in any other OECD country and has far outstripped earnings growth. Normally when demand is rising, construction booms as well and that eases price growth. This has not happened in the UK; construction of new housing has been decreasing more or less steadily since the late 1960s from 353k units in 1968 to 118k units in 2014, leading to a very substantial and ever-growing housing shortfall. Not only that; newly built homes are also about 40 percent smaller than in similarly densely populated European countries.

In the Greater London Area (GLA) the problem is particularly acute. To illustrate this, the average house price in the GLA has gone up by £65.2k year-on-year since March 2015. The latest average household income estimate for the capital for 2013 is £51.8k. Put differently, last year, the average London homeowner earned more from capital gains than a renter from working all year long. It is, therefore, no surprise that young adults without wealthy parents are increasingly priced out from getting onto the owner-occupied housing ladder. Renting in the private sector is similarly unaffordable, so the young - even the highly skilled - increasingly have no other option but to stay at their parents' home longer or leave the city. Consistent with this, the share of those employed in inner London working in professional scientific, research, engineering and technology jobs has fallen since 2011, hurting the capital's productivity. The housing affordability crisis is an economic as well as a social problem.

This article was published by Planning and Building Control Today on July 6, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Christian Hilber CEP Publications webpage



Tuesday 28 June 2016

Newsweek: Don't Believe the Brexit Prophecies of Economic Doom

We were told that the consensus of economic experts were overwhelmingly opposed to a Brexit. Lauded institutions—from the IMF, OECD to the Treasury and London School of Economics—produced damning forecasts that ranged from economic hardship to total disaster if the U.K

This article appeared in Newsweek on 28 June 2016. Link to article

Related publications See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Monday 27 June 2016

El Correo Gallego.es (Spain): No hay prisa para salir

Parecidos resultados obtiene para los mismos escenarios el informe del Centre for Economic Performance de la London School of Economics
In the three cases the fall of GDP in per cent, following the same order, would be 3.8, 6.2 and 7.5. Similar results obtained for the same scenarios the report of the Centre for Economic Performance of the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by El Correo Gallego (Spain) on June 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Sunday 26 June 2016

The Independent: Why did people really vote for Brexit? If we don't face the psychological reasons, we'll never bring Britain together

Why did so many millions of people vote to leave the European Union? ... Some new research by the labour market economists Brian Bell and Stephen Machin, seen by The Independent, suggests the Leave vote tended to be bigger in areas of the country where wage growth has been weakest since 1997. This would seem to support the popular theory that this was essentially a giant protest vote against the political class by people who feel economically ''left behind'' in modern Britain.

This article was published by The Independent on June 26, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brian Bell and Stephen Machin CEP publications webpage

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Friday 24 June 2016

La Izquierda Diario (Spanish): El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Friday 24 June 2016

La Izquierda Diario (Spanish): El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Wednesday 22 June 2016

TXFNews (Trade and Export Finance): How would Brexit affect UK trade?

The UK Treasury's estimate forecasts trade volumes declining by between 14% and 19% by 2030 in comparison to their current trajectory, on the assumption that the UK agrees a bilateral trade deal with the EU similar to that recently agreed by Canada. Although, some believe this forecast a tad severe: Oxford Economics modelled the same scenario and came up with a 7% fall in volumes. The London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance predicts that, in the long term, lower trade with the EU could cost the UK as much as 9.5% of GDP.

This article was published online by TXFNews on June 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Holger Breinlich webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Thursday 09 June 2016

LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog: Scenarios of a new UK-EU relationship: A 'soft' Brexit

What consequences will Britain's EU referendum have for both the UK and the rest of Europe? In a series of papers published as a collaboration between EUROPP and CIDOB (the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs), LSE authors analyse the prospects for three scenarios - a Bremain, a 'soft' Brexit and a 'harsh' Brexit. Swati Dhingra discusses what would happen in the case of a 'soft' Brexit, which is defined as the UK exiting the EU without a significant deterioration in relations between Britain and other EU countries. The full papers are available here.

This article was published online by LSE's EUROPP - European Politics and Policy - blog on June 9, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance, Holger Breinlich, Swati Dhingra, Saul Estrin, Hanwei Huang, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.08, June 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK’s options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.01, February 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Monday 06 June 2016

London Loves Business: 5 reasons the UK leaving the EU would be a DISASTER

A report by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics released last week published similar findings. The report said that in an “optimistic” scenario, the UK leaving the EU would knock off £850 per household. In a “pessimistic” scenario with larger increases in trade costs, Brexit will lower average incomes by £1,700 per household.

This article appeared in London Loves Business on 6 June 2016. Link to article

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


Monday 06 June 2016

Morning Star: UPDATE: 5 arguments in favor of a U.K. 'Brexit' from the EU -- and 5 against

U.K. shoppers save 350 pounds a year, or about $511, thanks to lower prices that come from being part of the EU. That's according to the remain campaign, which cites London School of Economics data

This article appeared in the Morning Star on 6 June 2016. Link to article

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


Tuesday 31 May 2016

BBC Radio 4: The science of resilience

Michael Pluess and Richard Layard interviewed about resilience and mental health.

The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4 on May 31, 2016
Link to interview here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Michael Pluess webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



Sunday 29 May 2016

lenabellina blog: That'll do, chimps

The second programme I heard and was inspired by was this week's Radio 4 'All in the Mind'. The key messages here also chimed with much of my own thinking about the purpose of education, the pressures created by assessment in schools and the need to focus on wellbeing in schools. The programme included a discussion around tests and exams and the mental health of children which involved Lord Layard from The London School of Economics, Dr Berry Billingsley, Associate Professor of Science Education and Reading University and her colleague Tim Williams who is a clinical and educational psychologist. ... Lord Richard Layard who directs the Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics then spoke about a project called 'Healthy Mind' which is working with 30 schools around London to try and get data in relation to this issue. Hs opening statement: ''We are trying to help people learn how to live and not just how to pass exams.''

This article was published online on the lenabellina blog on May 29, 2016
Link to article here

Related broadcast
The full BBC Radio 4 'All in the Mind' Episode can be found here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



Sunday 29 May 2016

lenabellina blog: That'll do, chimps

The second programme I heard and was inspired by was this week's Radio 4 'All in the Mind'. The key messages here also chimed with much of my own thinking about the purpose of education, the pressures created by assessment in schools and the need to focus on wellbeing in schools. The programme included a discussion around tests and exams and the mental health of children which involved Lord Layard from The London School of Economics, Dr Berry Billingsley, Associate Professor of Science Education and Reading University and her colleague Tim Williams who is a clinical and educational psychologist. ... Lord Richard Layard who directs the Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics then spoke about a project called 'Healthy Mind' which is working with 30 schools around London to try and get data in relation to this issue. Hs opening statement: ''We are trying to help people learn how to live and not just how to pass exams.''

This article was published online on the lenabellina blog on May 29, 2016
Link to article here

Related broadcast
The full BBC Radio 4 'All in the Mind' Episode can be found here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



Monday 23 May 2016

Daily Mail: Tories at war: Iain Duncan Smith accuses former Cabinet colleague of being two-faced over the EU as tensions escalate with a month to go before

Responding to Hilton’s article, Javid said: “Steve is entitled to his view … the central issue here is that economically, we are far better off being part of this single market … Now you have the Bank of England, the IMF [International Monetary Fund], the OECD [Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development], the London School of Economics, the OBR [Office for Budget Responsibility], the IFS [Institute for Fiscal Studies], every one of our allies, every one of our trading partners and that is not a conspiracy, that’s a consensus about what would happen if we left the EU.”

This article was published by the Daily Mail on May 23, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related Links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Wednesday 18 May 2016

CityLab: The complex relationship between data and cities

There's been no shortage of hype about the relationship between cities and data, especially so-called big data. For large numbers of tech companies, cities, and even a growing number of urbanists, data promises to solve all manner of urban problems, from predictive policing to improving traffic flow to promoting energy efficiency. An even bigger potential role for new kinds of data lies in helping researchers and policy-makers better understand how cities and neighborhoods grow and evolve - but only if done right.
Not all data from new sources qualifies as ''big data'', which - as its name implies - refers to truly massive amounts of information. Max Nathan of the London School of Economics breaks down actual big data into three key categories: internet data from sites like Yelp, Twitter, or Google and other commercial data, government-sponsored data collected by cities or towns, and Census and related data.

This article was published online by CityLab on May 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Mapping Digital Businesses with Big Data: some early findings from the UK, Max Nathan and Anna Rosso, Research Policy, 44(9), November 2015.

Related links
Max Nathan webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Wednesday 18 May 2016

The Financial Times: Number of EU nationals working in UK reaches record level

Jane Collins, employment spokesman for the pro-Brexit United Kingdom Independence party, said the 2.1m EU nationals working in Britain were ''a huge boon to multinational companies who can exploit the oversupply of labour to keep their wages low.'' However, John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, rebuffed that argument and said workers would suffer badly in the event of Brexit. ''There is no evidence that EU immigration does much harm to the jobs or pay of British people. By contrast, Brexit will inflict major damage on the real wages of ordinary workers by damaging trade, investment and productivity.''

This article was published by The Financial Times on May 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.05, May 2016
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Wednesday 18 May 2016

The Financial Times: Number of EU nationals working in UK reaches record level

Jane Collins, employment spokesman for the pro-Brexit United Kingdom Independence party, said the 2.1m EU nationals working in Britain were ''a huge boon to multinational companies who can exploit the oversupply of labour to keep their wages low.'' However, John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, rebuffed that argument and said workers would suffer badly in the event of Brexit. ''There is no evidence that EU immigration does much harm to the jobs or pay of British people. By contrast, Brexit will inflict major damage on the real wages of ordinary workers by damaging trade, investment and productivity.''

This article was published by The Financial Times on May 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.05, May 2016
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Wednesday 18 May 2016

The Financial Times: Number of EU nationals working in UK reaches record level

Jane Collins, employment spokesman for the pro-Brexit United Kingdom Independence party, said the 2.1m EU nationals working in Britain were ''a huge boon to multinational companies who can exploit the oversupply of labour to keep their wages low.'' However, John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, rebuffed that argument and said workers would suffer badly in the event of Brexit. ''There is no evidence that EU immigration does much harm to the jobs or pay of British people. By contrast, Brexit will inflict major damage on the real wages of ordinary workers by damaging trade, investment and productivity.''

This article was published by The Financial Times on May 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.05, May 2016
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Wednesday 11 May 2016

CEP State of Working Britain blog: SWOB 10: EU-turn if you want to. Brexit and immigration

State of Working Britain blog, article posted by Jonathan Wadsworth
Immigration has for some years been the uppermost worry among the issues thought to be facing Britain in many opinion polls so it - or rather people's perceptions of its extent and its effects - is almost certainly one of the key issues that will influence the upcoming vote on whether to stay or remain in the EU. A new report from the CEP looks into this. Workers have had a rough ride in recent times. Real (inflation adjusted) wages fell by around 10% in the years after the global financial crisis of 2008 and the ensuing austerity. Such a sustained fall in pay is unprecedented in British post-war history.

This article was posted online in the CEP State of Working Britain blog on May 11, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Jonathan Wadsworth, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Series No.5, May 2016

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
The State of Working Britain blog webpage



Saturday 07 May 2016

She the People TV: The Economics of Brexit with Swati Dhingra

The economist putting Brexit into context: meet Swati Dhingra
To take a closer look at the implications of 'Brexit', I asked Assistant Professor Swati Dhingra, of the Department of Economics and Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics a few questions. Here's our crash course. Of course, I took the opportunity to slip in a question related to to gender equality and academics.

The interview was filmed and broadcast by She the People TV (India) on May 7, 2016
Link to broadcast here

See also:
Get Topical News
Brexit perspectives with Swati Dhingra

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here
See all CEP publications by Swati Dhingra here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Saturday 30 April 2016

The Economist: The grip tightens

There is enough green-belt land in Greater London to build 1.6m houses at average densities, says Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics (LSE) - about 30 times the number of new houses London needs a year. But opposition from homeowners is strong - especially from those near the green belt, who do not much like the thought of newcomers bringing down property prices. ... A plethora of other regulations also block development. By one count there are ten protected views of St Paul's Cathedral, including one from a specific oak tree on Hampstead Heath. This imposes severe restrictions on building height across the city. Population density in central London is about half New York's. According to Mr Cheshire and Christian Hilber, also of the LSE, restrictive planning policies inflate the price of office space in the West End by about 800%. A square foot there is twice as expensive as in midtown Manhattan.

This article was published by The Economist on April 30, 2016 Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Monday 25 April 2016

Capita: Synthetic phonics can improve reading skills, study claims

Using synthetic phonics to teach children how to read can have considerable long-term benefits for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds and those who do not have English as a first language, according to a new study by the Centre for Economic Performance(CEP).
Researchers at the CEP, which is based at the London School of Economics (LSE), tracked the progress of more than 270,000 children in 150 local authorities. They found that children taught to read using phonics made better progress by age seven than those taught using other methods. However, those lagging behind would catch up later.

this article was published online by Capita on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Monday 25 April 2016

The Economist: London's property woes are getting worse

Poor land-use regulation is the main reason for Londons crazy prices. Two problems stand out. ... There is enough green-belt land in Greater London to build 1.6m houses at average densities, says Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics (LSE) - about 30 times the number of new houses London needs annually. ... A plethora of other regulations also block development. By one count there are ten protected views of St Paul's Cathedral, including one from a specific oak tree on Hampstead Heath. This imposes severe restrictions on building height across the city. Population density in central London is about half New York's. According to Mr [Paul] Cheshire and Christian Hilber, also of the LSE, restrictive planning policies inflate the price of office space in the West End by about 800%.

This article was published by The Economist on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Monday 25 April 2016

The Daily Mail: Teaching children to read using phonics has 'significant benefits' in helping those from disadvantaged backgrounds or who have English as a second language

An assessment of more than 270,000 children by LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) discovered that those who were learning phonetically had developed far better by age seven than those using traditional methods.

This article was published online by The Daily Mail on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'"Teaching to Teach" Literacy', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Thursday 21 April 2016

The Yorkshire Post: Obama's arrival in UK brings a boost for the Remain campaign

US PRESIDENT Barack Obama is expected to give a major boost to the Remain campaign tomorrow by backing David Cameron's call for Britain to stay in the European Union.
Earlier this week the Treasury published analysis suggesting Britain's departure from the European Union would cost households on average £4,300 a year. ... The Treasury forecast suggests Britain's GDP would be cut by 6.2 per cent but economists at the LSEs Centre for Economic Performance put the figure at between 6.3 and 9.5 per cent. Swati Dhingra, from the LSE, said: "The Treasury Report looks at the realistic options the UK will face after Brexit - and the cost of each. It takes a conservative approach to the potential costs."

This article was published online by The Yorkshire Post on April 21, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Tuesday 19 April 2016

Straits Times (Singapore): The numbers show Britain should stay in the EU

A very awkward fact for the Brexit campaign is that in the last quarter of 2015, Britain's current-account deficit hit a record 7 per cent of GDP. That needs to be financed. But the risk of Brexit is already acting like a flashing red light to foreign investors. According to the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, leaving the EU could reduce foreign direct investment in the UK by 22 per cent and real income by 3.4 per cent.

This article was published online by the Straits Times (Singapore) on April 19, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The Impact of Brexit on Foreign Investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.3, April 2016
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Tuesday 19 April 2016

Financial Times: Free Lunch: Sizing up Little England

This is well illustrated by the excellent Brexit study from the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, which we reported last month.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 18 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Friday 15 April 2016

Chicago Tribune Online: Osborne warns of Brexit cost as leading economies raise concerns

Research for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, published on Friday, estimated that foreign direct investment in Britain could decline by 22 percent if voters choose to leave the EU, reducing incomes by about 3.4 percent. The analysis, carried out by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, found that reduced access to the single market, complexities in coordination between headquarters and local branch offices and uncertainty over trade agreements with the EU would deter investors.

This article appeared in the Chicago Tribune on 15 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Thursday 14 April 2016

Times Higher Education: Cambridge college to fund disadvantaged students' living costs

Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, said that St John's students would welcome the funding but warned that a move towards support coming from universities rather than the government was a ''worrying prospect''. Dr Wyness said that, since less prestigious universities had less money but more students from poorer backgrounds to support, the likely outcome was increased variation in the value of financial support, and increased income inequality in higher education.

This article was published online by the Times Higher Education on April 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Paper No.26, March 2015

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Thursday 14 April 2016

Times Higher Education: Cambridge college to fund disadvantaged students' living costs

Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, said that St John's students would welcome the funding but warned that a move towards support coming from universities rather than the government was a ''worrying prospect''. Dr Wyness said that, since less prestigious universities had less money but more students from poorer backgrounds to support, the likely outcome was increased variation in the value of financial support, and increased income inequality in higher education.

This article was published online by the Times Higher Education on April 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Paper No.26, March 2015

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Thursday 14 April 2016

Times Higher Education: Cambridge college to fund disadvantaged students' living costs

Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, said that St John's students would welcome the funding but warned that a move towards support coming from universities rather than the government was a ''worrying prospect''. Dr Wyness said that, since less prestigious universities had less money but more students from poorer backgrounds to support, the likely outcome was increased variation in the value of financial support, and increased income inequality in higher education.

This article was published online by the Times Higher Education on April 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Paper No.26, March 2015

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Tuesday 12 April 2016

The New York Times: Lifting the patent barrier to new drugs and energy sources

... Do we need a different way to spur innovation and disseminate new technologies quickly around the world? Are patents, which reward inventors by providing them with a government-guaranteed monopoly over their inventions for many years, the best way to encourage new inventions?
... In the case of clean energy technology, noted a study by Professor Hall of Berkeley and Christian Helmers of the Center for Economic Performance in London, ''patent protection may not be the optimal instrument for encouraging innovation.''

This article was published by The New York Times on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Christian Helmers webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Tuesday 12 April 2016

New Geography: LSE/Netherlands research documents price effects of tight housing regulation

New research by London school of economics Professor Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen of the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis provides strength and evidence of the connection between high housing prices and strong regulatory constraints. The paper advances the science by estimating the share of house price increases attributable to regulatory constraints. Hilbur and Vermeulen show that supply constraints are considerably more important in driving up house prices than the physical constraints (such as lack of land or topography) and lending conditions or interest rates.

This article was published online by NewGeography on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related article
April 10, 2016
Vox
Regulation is to blame for England's surge in house prices, Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen

Related publications
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, C. A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, Economic Journal 126(591): 358–405, March 2016.
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, Christian A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, Urban Programme [SERC] Discussion Paper No.119, September 2012

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Tuesday 12 April 2016

The Huffington Post: Why phones don't belong in schools

There's no doubt that smartphones have remarkable capabilities which, in theory, could promote student learning. But the truth is that kids - in spite of the best efforts of parents and teachers - use their phones primarily to access digital amusements. ... It's therefore not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that schools which ban the use of phones experienced a substantial improvement in student test scores, with the researchers concluding that phones ''can have a negative impact on productivity through distraction''. Researchers found that phones hurt vulnerable students the most. Study co-author Dr. Richard Murphy, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas, reports: ''Allowing phones into schools would be the most damaging to low-achieving and low-income students, exacerbating any existing learning inequalities.''

This article was published online by The Huffington Post on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphywebpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Tuesday 12 April 2016

The Huffington Post: Why phones don't belong in schools

There's no doubt that smartphones have remarkable capabilities which, in theory, could promote student learning. But the truth is that kids - in spite of the best efforts of parents and teachers - use their phones primarily to access digital amusements. ... It's therefore not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that schools which ban the use of phones experienced a substantial improvement in student test scores, with the researchers concluding that phones ''can have a negative impact on productivity through distraction''. Researchers found that phones hurt vulnerable students the most. Study co-author Dr. Richard Murphy, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas, reports: ''Allowing phones into schools would be the most damaging to low-achieving and low-income students, exacerbating any existing learning inequalities.''

This article was published online by The Huffington Post on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphywebpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Tuesday 12 April 2016

The Huffington Post: Why phones don't belong in schools

There's no doubt that smartphones have remarkable capabilities which, in theory, could promote student learning. But the truth is that kids - in spite of the best efforts of parents and teachers - use their phones primarily to access digital amusements. ... It's therefore not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that schools which ban the use of phones experienced a substantial improvement in student test scores, with the researchers concluding that phones ''can have a negative impact on productivity through distraction''. Researchers found that phones hurt vulnerable students the most. Study co-author Dr. Richard Murphy, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas, reports: ''Allowing phones into schools would be the most damaging to low-achieving and low-income students, exacerbating any existing learning inequalities.''

This article was published online by The Huffington Post on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphywebpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Monday 11 April 2016

Eurasia Review: Regulation To Blame For England's Surging House Prices – Analysis, By Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen

New causal evidence on the impact of supply constraints on house prices shows land use regulation to be a major culprit of England’s current housing affordability crisis. Absent regulation, house prices would be lower by over a third and considerably less volatile. Young households are the obvious losers, yet macroeconomic stability is also impaired and productivity may suffer from constrained labour supply to the thriving cities where demand is highest.

This article appeared on Eurasia Review on 11 April 2016 Link to article

Related Links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Sunday 10 April 2016

Vox: Regulation is to blame for England's surging house prices

It costs a relatively large amount of money to buy a house in the UK - something readers from the UK will almost certainly agree with. But economists differ over why this is. This column argues that strict planning regulations are a prime culprit for sky-high prices and that without any real regulatory change, it is the young that will suffer.

New causal evidence on the impact of supply constraints on house prices shows land use regulation to be a major culprit of England's current housing affordability crisis. Absent regulation, house prices would be lower by over a third and considerably less volatile. Young households are the obvious losers, yet macroeconomic stability is also impaired and productivity may suffer from constrained labour supply to the thriving cities where demand is highest.

This article was published by Vox on April 10, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, C. A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, Economic Journal 126(591): 358–405, March 2016.
The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England, Christian A. L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, Urban Programme [SERC] Discussion Paper No.119, September 2012

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 07 April 2016

VOX: Effectiveness of place-based policies: UK evidence

Areas experiencing poor economic performance are often targeted by governments with programmes aimed at improving employment. However, there are concerns that any increases in employment come at the cost of reduced employment elsewhere. This column, by Elias Einiö and Henry Overman examines the displacement effects of one such programme in the UK. While employment increased within the targeted areas, there were comparable decreases in employment just outside the areas' boundaries. These findings suggest place-based policies should focus on traded activities that are less susceptible to local displacement effects.

This article appeared in VOX 07 April 2016. Link to Full Article.

Related links
Elias Einiö webpage
Henry Overman webpage
CEP Urban Programme website

Saturday 02 April 2016

Gulf Times: Minimum wage raised, critics downplay effect

The new increased amount compares with an 8.50 euro minimum wage rate in Germany and almost 9.70 euros in France. In Britain, where unemployment is relatively low at around 5%, large wage inequalities persist and London School of Economics professor Alan Manning described the NLW as “more symbolic” than anything else. “It’s significant but I don’t think one should exaggerate its significance,” he said.

This article appeared in The Gulf Times on 2 April 2016. Link to article

Also in:
The Gulf Today
Jamaica Observer

Related Publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Thursday 31 March 2016

Times Higher Education: Universities and economic growth go together

Some say of newer institutions that more means less, but that's not true - more universities mean a larger economy. ... A study from the London School of Economics, ''The economic impact of universities: evidence from across the globe'', aims to do just this, assessing the link between growth in university numbers and gross domestic product per capita between 1950 and 2010, using data on 15,000 universities in 78 countries. The conclusion of authors Anna Valero and John Van Reenen is that doubling the number of universities per capita is associated with over 4 per cent higher GDP per capita within the region, and that this also ''spills over'' to neighbouring regions.

This article was published online by The Times Higher Education on March 31, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Anna Valero webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Tuesday 22 March 2016

moneyexpert: CBI: EU exit could cost £100bn and 1m jobs

The Centre for Economic Performance at LSE released a report last week that also states that British living standards and trade will be damaged if an ''out'' vote wins the referendum. In their research, the body states that the best case scenario would still see household incomes hit by around £850 per year. The organisation went on to say that this figure could rise to as much as £6,400 per household if trade and productivity are more severely impacted; this represents a fall not seen since the peak of the financial crisis in 2008-09.

This article was published online by moneyexpert on March 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, March 2016.
Download the accompanying Technical Paper here
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Saturday 05 March 2016

U.S. News and World Report: Arguments and allegations are flying as Britons grapple with how to vote in a June 23 referendum on whether to stay in the European Union or walk away

The London School of Economics' Center for Economic Policy[sic] has calculated that, even if trade barriers with other European countries do not significantly increase, per capita income in Britain will fall by between 1.1 percent and 3.1 percent after a Brexit. ''The possibility of trading more with the rest of the world can't offset the loss of trade with the EU,'' said the center's Thomas Sampson.

This article was published by U.S. News & World Report on March 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.22, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Saturday 05 March 2016

U.S. News and World Report: Arguments and allegations are flying as Britons grapple with how to vote in a June 23 referendum on whether to stay in the European Union or walk away

The London School of Economics' Center for Economic Policy[sic] has calculated that, even if trade barriers with other European countries do not significantly increase, per capita income in Britain will fall by between 1.1 percent and 3.1 percent after a Brexit. ''The possibility of trading more with the rest of the world can't offset the loss of trade with the EU,'' said the center's Thomas Sampson.

This article was published by U.S. News & World Report on March 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.22, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Saturday 05 March 2016

U.S. News and World Report: Arguments and allegations are flying as Britons grapple with how to vote in a June 23 referendum on whether to stay in the European Union or walk away

The London School of Economics' Center for Economic Policy[sic] has calculated that, even if trade barriers with other European countries do not significantly increase, per capita income in Britain will fall by between 1.1 percent and 3.1 percent after a Brexit. ''The possibility of trading more with the rest of the world can't offset the loss of trade with the EU,'' said the center's Thomas Sampson.

This article was published by U.S. News & World Report on March 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.22, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Monday 29 February 2016

BBC South East: Inside Out

Paul Cheshire is interviewed about building on the green belt in the South East.

The interview was broadcast by BBC South East on the Inside Out programme on February 29, 2016
Link to recorded interview here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 18 February 2016

LSE News and Media: Equity crowdfunding: a new model for financing entrepreneurship

According to CEP's researchers writing in the latest issue of CentrePiece, its departmental magazine, crowdfunding ''serves as a robust source of alternative entrepreneurial finance which has operated in a stable and predictable manner'' in its infancy.

This press release was published online by LSE's News and Media on February 18, 2016
Link to the release here

See also:
Equity Crowdfunding News
Equity crowdfunding: a new model for financing entrepreneurship - 02-2016 - News archive - News - News and Media - Home
lse.ac.uk - Researchers from LSE.s Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) have demonstrated the benefits of equity crowdfunding as a robust alternative for investors and entrepreneurs. CEP has analysed invest ...
Link to article here

Related publications
Equity crowdfunding: a new model for financing entrepreneurship?, Saul Estrin and Susanna Khavul. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 3, Winter 2015/16

Related links
Saul Estrin webpage
Susanna Khavul webpage
Growth Programme webpage



Thursday 18 February 2016

The Times: Number of £1 million homes to triple by 2030

... Paul Cheshire, emeritus professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, who conducted the...

This article appeared in the Times on 18 February 2016. Link to article

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Thursday 18 February 2016

The Times: Number of £1 million homes to triple by 2030

... Paul Cheshire, emeritus professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, who conducted the...

This article appeared in the Times on 18 February 2016. Link to article

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Thursday 18 February 2016

The Independent: UK homes worth £1m to ‘triple by 2030'

“For those who still aspire to buy a home, it will make taking that step on to the ladder increasingly difficult,” said Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at London School of Economics, who authored the report.

This article appeared in the Indepednent on 18 February 2016. Link to article

Also in: The Herald and Coventry Telegraph, iPaper, The Journal (Newcastle)

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Thursday 18 February 2016

Daily Telegraph: Number of £1m homes set to triple by 2030 - but first-time buyers will still struggle

Professor Paul Cheshire from London School of Economics and Political Science, who co-authored the report, said: “Property price inflation is beneficial for existing owners who will see their net-wealth increase, but it will make entering the market more difficult still for new buyers.”

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 18 February 2016 Link to article

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Sunday 10 January 2016

Mail on Sunday: Donald Trump's £700m blowhard: Economist brands billionaire's promise of Scots bonanza a 'fairytale'

Professor Paul Cheshire accused the tycoon of hugely exaggerating the size and benefits of his stake in Scotland and said promises made by him were falling apart at the seams.

This article was published by the Mail on Sunday on January 10, 2016
Link to article here

Related Links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Tuesday 05 January 2016

Personnel Today: Linking work and health: the What Works Centre for Wellbeing

Cross-cutting capabilities: This project is being led by Professor Lord Richard Layard of the London School of Economics and will assess and develop methods of understanding how policy and practice can affect wellbeing. It will look at the effect of different factors on wellbeing, analyse the impact of wellbeing on other outcomes and develop a framework for cost effectiveness analysis with wellbeing as the measure of benefit. It will also carry out a “life course” analysis, looking at how important early life is to wellbeing in later years.

This article appeared on Personnel Today on 5 January 2016 Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage

Monday 21 December 2015

Western Mail (Cardiff): These boots were made for walking

...gym membership for some good walking shoes. New research from the London School of Economics and Political ...

This article was published by the Western Mail (Cardiff) on December 21, 2015
[No link available.]

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



Monday 21 December 2015

Western Mail (Cardiff): These boots were made for walking

...gym membership for some good walking shoes. New research from the London School of Economics and Political ...

This article was published by the Western Mail (Cardiff) on December 21, 2015
[No link available.]

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



Monday 21 December 2015

Western Mail (Cardiff): These boots were made for walking

...gym membership for some good walking shoes. New research from the London School of Economics and Political ...

This article was published by the Western Mail (Cardiff) on December 21, 2015
[No link available.]

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



Monday 21 December 2015

Health Management.org: Lowest Hospital Spending: Not Where You Think

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Yale University, University of Pennsylvania and the London School of Economics analysed the real prices that hospitals negotiate with private insurers. They found that hospitals that spend less on Medicare do not necessarily spend less on healthcare overall. The researchers analysed 92 billion health insurance claims from 88 million people that were insured by the three largest companies: Aetna, Humana and UnitedHealthcare.

This article appeared in Health Management.org on 21 December 2015. Link to artilce

Related publications
The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured, Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Monday 21 December 2015

Health Management.org: Lowest Hospital Spending: Not Where You Think

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Yale University, University of Pennsylvania and the London School of Economics analysed the real prices that hospitals negotiate with private insurers. They found that hospitals that spend less on Medicare do not necessarily spend less on healthcare overall. The researchers analysed 92 billion health insurance claims from 88 million people that were insured by the three largest companies: Aetna, Humana and UnitedHealthcare.

This article appeared in Health Management.org on 21 December 2015. Link to artilce

Related publications
The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured, Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Friday 18 December 2015

Private Sector Development (World bank blog): What's next fo the competitive cities initiative: ‘To travel far, let's travel together'

The World Bank Group launched the Competitive Cities report [1] on December 10 - ''Competitive Cities for Jobs and Growth: What, Who and How,'' which represents almost two years of research and analysis to put together a reliable, comprehensive and unified body of work. It is aimed primarily to help cities formulate and implement economic development strategies, and it is intended to be used by city leaders themselves. ... ''This [report] seems like a natural outflow from the World Development Report 2009 [7] ... [That report in] 2009 was a huge step [8] in getting us towards thinking more about cities [9]. What is really nice about this report is that it is the next step on this journey [of trying to understand] how we should be structuring decision-making to try to drive forward this [economic development of cities] agenda.'' - Professor Henry Overman, London School of Economics; Director, What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth.

This article was published online by Private Sector Development (World bank blog) on December 18, 2015
Link to the blog article here

Related links
Henry Overman webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage



Thursday 17 December 2015

Telegraph: Five simple habits that will make you feel happier

Happiness expert Prof Paul Dolan, a professor at the London School of Economics, recently outlined five tips for feeling more content.

This article was published online by the Telegraph on December 17, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



Friday 11 December 2015

The Economist: A notch looser

The new proposals would probably affect just a few hundred hectares, says Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics—“a spit in the ocean”. But it is nonetheless significant that the government is sanctioning any kind of review of the green-belt policy, he says.

This article appeared in the Economist on 11 December 2015. Link to artilce

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Thursday 10 December 2015

Lincolnshire Echo: Every brisk step counts towards improving your health - so get walking

... your gym membership for some good walking shoes. Research from the London School of Economics and Political Science ...

This article was published by the Lincolnshire Echo on December 10, 2015

Also in
Newcastle Journal

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



Wednesday 02 December 2015

El Pais: La Comunidad Valenciana ante el dilemma de la reindustrializacion

Faced with the dilemma of re-industrialization Valencia
Andres Rodriguez-Pose, Professor at the London School of Economics, said for his part, that the Valencian economy is currently ''very weak''. And has highlighted the paradox that, despite being a territory historically exporter, the internationalization of enterprises is lower than the Spanish average. And that, despite being a community with entrepreneurial tradition, the level of training of entrepreneurs is also below the average.

This article was published by El Pais on December 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Andres Rodriguez-Pose webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Thursday 12 November 2015

Evening Standard : Let's build on green belt to ease squeeze on commuters

Real house prices — but not real incomes — have grown faster in the UK over the last 40 years than in any other developed country, according to the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Evening Standard on 12 November 2015. Link to article

Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Wednesday 11 November 2015

Stock Journal: Is this the optimal exercise for staying slim?

Researchers from the London School of Economics looked at how regularly Britons engaged in 30 minutes or more of walking, moderate intensity exercise such as going to the gym, swimming, dancing, running and tennis, as well as heavy housework or heavy outdoor labour like chopping wood.

This article appeared in Stock Journal on 11 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

Sunday 08 November 2015

The Observer: Artificial intelligence: ‘Homo sapiens will be split into a handful of gods and the rest of us'

Recent research led by Guy Michaels at the London School of Economics looked at detailed data across 14 industries and 17 countries over more than a decade, and found that the adoption of robots boosted productivity and wages without significantly undermining jobs.

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Saturday 07 November 2015

Eurasia Review: Offshoring and the geography of British jobs – analysis

Offshoring has risen in all advanced economies in recent years. This column analyses the impact of offshoring trends in the UK, where offshoring in services has followed the abundant offshoring in manufacturing, by uncovering their spatial implications. The impact of offshoring in places more exposed to such trends has been significantly negative on routine occupations. On the other hand, when investment abroad targeted developing economies, the effect on job creation in non-routine occupations was positive.

This article appeared in the Eurasia Review on 7 November 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Offshoring and the Geography of Jobs in Great Britain Luisa Gagliardi, Simona Iammarino and Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, SERC Discussion Paper No.185, October 2015

Related Links
Luisa Gagliardi webpage
Simona Iammarino webpage
Andres Rodriguez-Pose webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Thursday 05 November 2015

Israel Herald: Brisk walking a better method for losing weight than going to the gym, study claims

Regular, brisk walking may be a more effective method for weight loss than going to the gym, according to research. A study by the London School of Economics found that those who engaged in "regular, brisk walking" for longer than half an hour had lower Body Mass Indexes (BMI) and smaller waists than those who did other exercise such as going the gym or playing football or rugby.

This article appeared in the Israel Herald on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

Thursday 05 November 2015

La Voz de Galicia: Lo que Albert Rivera esconde, clave del éxito de Ciudadanos en las generales

Conscientes de qué es lo que realmente preocupa a los españoles, los de Rivera han desplegado todo su encanto en un puñado de medidas orquestadas por el célebre economista Luis Garicano.

This article appeared in La Voz de Galicia on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Thursday 05 November 2015

Belfast News Letter: Brisk walk 'better than gym' for weight

A study from the London School of Economics and Political Science found that people may benefit more from "high impact" walking than other activities, such as going to the gym.

This article appeared in Belfast News Letter on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

Wednesday 04 November 2015

The Express: Just 30 minutes of walking a day will keep you slim

Research from the London School of Economics said that people who regularly stride out are more likely to have slimmer waistlines and a lower body mass index than people who do high-intensity workouts.

This article appeared in The Express on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

Tuesday 03 November 2015

Onda Cero: Luis Garicano: ''Antonio Baños quiere crear un país nuevo y ni siquiera sabe contar''

El coordinador del programa económico de Ciudadanos, Luis Garicano, asegura en Más de uno que no va a ir en las listas del partido pero que esta "totalmente involucrado" en el proyecto.

This article apperaed in Onda Cero on 3 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Tuesday 27 October 2015

Times Higher Education (Online): NSS results have little impact on university applications, study finds

An institution moving from the bottom of the scale (around a 65 per cent NSS satisfaction score) to the top of the scale (around 95 per cent satisfaction) results in a degree course gaining only about seven more applicants for every 100 it already receives, according to Stephen Gibbons, professor of economic geography and environment at the London School of Economics (LSE) and co-author of the report.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education (Online) on 27 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Friday 23 October 2015

LSE British Politics and Policy blog: Britain needs Europe a lot more than Europe needs Britain

With the Leave.eu campaign pledging to win back the UK, and with The Britain Stronger in Europe campaign pledging to explain the ''true reality of life'' outside the EU, arguments for and against UK's membership give and take daily. Here, Dennis Novy explains why a divorce from the EU would risk putting the UK in a weaker economic position.

This blog article was published by LSE British Politics and Policy on October 23, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Dennis Novy webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage



Thursday 22 October 2015

Estado de Minas: Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Thursday 22 October 2015

Estado de Minas: Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Thursday 22 October 2015

Estado de Minas: Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Thursday 22 October 2015

Estado de Minas: Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Thursday 22 October 2015

Estado de Minas: Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Thursday 15 October 2015

Housebuilding in Britain: How to build more?: The Economist (Online)

Council tax is set at the local level. This should give councils a reason to build more houses: more houses, more tax revenue. But it does not, as Christian Hilber of the London School of Economics explains. For one, council taxes bear little relation to underlying property values (they are based on prices prevailing in the early 1990s).

This article appeared in the Economist Online on 15 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Christian Hilber CEP publications webpage

Monday 12 October 2015

Share Radio - Morning-Money: How are robots impacting on the economy?

Robots are gradually becoming a part of everyday life, and as a result are impacting on the economy. To look at the influence robots are having, Joe Aldridge speaks with Guy Michaels, Associate Professor at the London School of Economics and co-author of a report on robots at work, and Stian Westlake, Executive Director of Policy and Research at innovation charity Nesta.

The interview was broadcast on Share Radio's Morning Money programme on October 12, 2015
Link to broadcast here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Thursday 01 October 2015

Mother Jones: Can We Give Electricity to Everybody and Still Stop Climate Change?

A group of British scientists and economists including Lords Nicholas Stern and Richard Layard have called for a "global Apollo program" to help fund the research and development of sustainable generation, storage, and smart-grid technologies, financed by 0.02 percent of global GDP.

This article appeared in Mother Jones on 1 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Wednesday 30 September 2015

BBC Radio Suffolk: News

Debate on banning mobile phones from classrooms mentions LSE [CEP] research.

The news item was broadcast by BBC Radio Suffolk on September 30, 2015
Link to broadcast here

See also
BBC Radio Shropshire
News
Discussion of LSE research on banning mobile phones from classrooms

BBC Hereford and Worcester
News
Discussion of banning mobile phones from classrooms mentions LSE research

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Wednesday 30 September 2015

BBC Radio Suffolk: News

Debate on banning mobile phones from classrooms mentions LSE [CEP] research.

The news item was broadcast by BBC Radio Suffolk on September 30, 2015
Link to broadcast here

See also
BBC Radio Shropshire
News
Discussion of LSE research on banning mobile phones from classrooms

BBC Hereford and Worcester
News
Discussion of banning mobile phones from classrooms mentions LSE research

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Wednesday 30 September 2015

The Atlantic: The $5 cereal that provoked a London mob

In the East London case, wrote Paul Cheshire, an emeritus professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, via email, ''the very early relatively poor but mainly educated/drop-out pioneer gentrifiers - typical of most processes of gentrification moving into areas of architectural interest in mainly inner city neighborhoods when those are still rundown and largely occupied by working class or refugee poor - are being replaced by richer and more market-oriented still mainly liberal professional and successfully university educated successor gentrifiers, who are a good bit richer and (commercially) fashion-conscious''. The ''pioneer gentrifiers'' were attracted not just to East London's cheapness but also its edginess, which they believe the richer groups are eroding.

This article was published online by The Atlantic (USA) on September 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage



Wednesday 30 September 2015

The Times: We ought to be appalled to see what's happening to the greenbelt

This was based on a study by Professor Paul Cheshire, of the London School of Economics, which declared that...

This article was published by The Times on September 30, 2015
[Subscription needed to view article.]

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



Sunday 27 September 2015

BBC World Service: BBC World News

Joan Costa Font comments on the elections in Catalonia

This interview was broadcast on BBC World Service on 27 September 2015 Link

Also on:
National Public Radio Link

Related Links
Joan Costa Font webpage
Wellbeing webpage

Sunday 27 September 2015

Il Sole 24 Ore Online: Se la Spagna diventa il nuovo anello debole d'Europa

A differenza del partito di Grillo, però, Ciudadanos ha chiare posizioni liberiste in economia, avendo scelto come consigliere economico Luis Garicano, professore alla London School of Economics con dottorato a Chicago.

This article appeared on Il Sole 24 Ore Online on 27 September 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth webpage

Saturday 26 September 2015

The Economist: Through the roof

Much green-belt land is far from green: one-third of London’s and three-quarters of that in Cambridge is intensive arable land, estimates Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics, who says there is enough green-belt land in Greater London to build 1.6m houses.

This article appeared in the Economist on 26 September 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Saturday 26 September 2015

The Economist: Through the roof

Much green-belt land is far from green: one-third of London’s and three-quarters of that in Cambridge is intensive arable land, estimates Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics, who says there is enough green-belt land in Greater London to build 1.6m houses.

This article appeared in the Economist on 26 September 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Saturday 26 September 2015

The Economist: Through the roof

Much green-belt land is far from green: one-third of London’s and three-quarters of that in Cambridge is intensive arable land, estimates Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics, who says there is enough green-belt land in Greater London to build 1.6m houses.

This article appeared in the Economist on 26 September 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Friday 25 September 2015

Forbes: Governments Still Don't Know Which Policies Help Entrepreneurs

These are the sorts of questions the excellent What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth looks at. It recently delved into the evidence around innovation policy and will have a report out on the matter soon. I caught up with its Director Professor Henry Overman to find out more about what works in innovation policy.

This article appeared on Forbes on 25 September 2015 Link to article

Related Links
Henry Overman webpage
What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth webpage

Friday 25 September 2015

Forbes: Governments still don't know which policies help entrepreneurs

Henry Overman interviewed by Philip Salter
It's easy to make policy, but it's hard to make the right ones. These are the sorts of questions the excellent What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth looks at. It recently delved into the evidence around innovation policy and will have a report out on the matter soon. I caught up with its Director Professor Henry Overman to find out more about what works in innovation policy.

This article was published online by Forbes on September 25, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Henry Overman webpage
Urban Economics and Urban Policy Programmewebpage
What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth website



Wednesday 23 September 2015

La provincial.es: La batalla de las balanzas fiscales

In that vein, Luis Garicano, Professor at the London School of Economics said in an article that "would gain from spreading, as in a divorce, is not what the husband's transfer, because then there are many duplications: need two houses, two cars?" Catalonia and Spain needed two armies, two consular networks?

This article appeared on La Provincial.es on 23 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano link to article
Growth webpage

Monday 21 September 2015

BBC Radio Kent: Paul Cheshire interview

Yes we spoke to Professor Paul Cheshire an economist and housing expert at the London school of economics he strongly believes that our greenbelt rules need shaking up in order to meet the house building crisis.

This programme was broadcast on 21 September 2015 Link to article

Also on:
BBC South East (TV)
Inside Out
This professor, an expert in housing and the economy at the London School of Economics says the current Green Belt policy should be shaken up. Link

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014 CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage Urban Economics Programme webpage

Monday 21 September 2015

BBC Radio Kent : News

Paul Cheshire interviewed on housing shortage in the South East and how building on the greenbelt necessary and acceptable to do so when within 2 km of a railway station.

This programme was broadcast on 21 September 2015. Link to article

See also:
BBC South East (TV)
Inside Out
This professor, an expert in housing and the economy at the London School of Economics says the current Green Belt policy should be shaken up.
Link to article here

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website



Thursday 17 September 2015

ITV1 Anglia West: News

Reference to LSE study which shows academic benefits of banning mobiles in schools

This programme was broadcast on 17 September 2015 (no link available).

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Wednesday 16 September 2015

Financial Times : Ireland leads the way as eurozone homes market begins to recover

"I am sceptical of attempts to aggregate house price data because there is no such thing as a European real estate market," said Christian Hilber, a housing expert at the London School of Economics. "Real estate markets are inherently local. Even within individual states there are big differences driven by local demand and supply condition.”

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 16 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage

Monday 14 September 2015

BBC Radio Wiltshire: News

Mention of LSE research on the effects of mobile phone use on children.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio Wiltshire on 14 September 2015 (no link available.

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Monday 14 September 2015

Sky News: News

Reference to LSE study endorsing ban on smart phones in schools.

Also on:
BBC Radio 4, BBC London 94.9FM,BBC Radio Somerset, BBC Radio Bristol, BBC Radio Wiltshire, BBC Radio Gloucestershire, BBC Radio Nottingham

This programme was broadcast on 14 September 2015 on Sky News (no link available)

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Monday 14 September 2015

Sky News: News

Reference to LSE study endorsing ban on smart phones in schools.

Also on:
BBC Radio 4, BBC London 94.9FM,BBC Radio Somerset, BBC Radio Bristol, BBC Radio Wiltshire, BBC Radio Gloucestershire, BBC Radio Nottingham

This programme was broadcast on 14 September 2015 on Sky News (no link available)

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



Monday 14 September 2015

The Guardian : Inquiry looks at mobile phones' effect on how children behave

A study by the London School of Economics in May found that banning phones from the classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an extra week of classes over an academic year, benefiting low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds most.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Sunday 13 September 2015

Svenska Dagbladet online (Sweden): Garage säljs som bostäder – p-platser kostar miljoner

Under perioden mellan 1994 och 2012 borde man ha byggt över två miljoner fler hus. De höga priserna beror på en kronisk brist på bostäder, anser Paul Cheshire, professor i ekonomisk geografi på London School of Economics.
In the period between 1994 and 2012 should have built more than two million more houses. The high prices are due to a chronic lack of housing, thinks Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in Svenska Dagbladet on 13 September 2015. Link to article Related links

Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) Website

Sunday 13 September 2015

Telegraph (web): Mobile phones and iPads could be banned from classrooms

In May, research by the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students’ learning by as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over an academic year. The report suggested that banning phones would most help low-achieving children and those from the poorest backgrounds the most.

This article appeared in the Telegraph (web) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Friday 04 September 2015

Welt online: Willkommen in Deutschstadt!

...Produktivitat und dadurch zu mehr Wachstum'', sagt etwa Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor an der London School of Economics (LSE).
''Urbanisation leads to higher productivity and therefore to more growth,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, associate professor at the London School of Economics (LSE).

This article was published online by De Welt online on September 4, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website



Tuesday 01 September 2015

Acteurspublics: Plus ou moins d'autonomie : à chacun son école…

...Unprecedented and profound mutation in the English system", says Stephen Machin, Professor of Economics at the University College of London (UCL).

This article was published online by Acteurspublics on September 1, 2015
Link to article here [Subscription needed.]

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



Friday 28 August 2015

Tendencias21: Guest Reviews: Ecoomia solidaria

Solidarity Economy: Conversations with the Dalai Lama about altruism, development and compassion
The Mind and Life Institute was born in 1987 ... the Professor Emeritus of Economics at the London School of Economics, Lord Richard Layard exposes an interesting paper, 'The economy of Happiness', in which he talks about why happiness levels have remained stagnant, despite unprecedented increases in income and the quality of life of mankind.

This article was published online by Tendencias21 on August 28, 2015
Link to article here
Translation here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



Saturday 15 August 2015

LSE British Politics and Policy blog: Corbyn and the political economy of nostalgia

Article by John Van Reenen
Unlike most commentators I have actually read Corbyn's ''The Economy in 2020'' as well as the 1983 manifesto. Corbyn's document has several major advantages. First, at 8 pages it is much shorter and second, it does not (yet) commit the UK to leaving the European Union (a very silly idea). Indeed, Corby-nomics strikes many of the right notes. Low productivity is holding down wages and inadequate infrastructure in housing, transport and energy is, in turn, depressing productivity. This resonates with my findings in the LSE Growth Commission.

This article was published online in the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on August 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Should we stay or should we go?, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP Election Analyses 2015, March 2015

Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, CEP Election Analyses 2015, March 2015
  • VIEW accompanying video here

  • Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Innovation and Infrastructure, LSE Growth Commission in partnership with the Institute for Government and the Centre for Economic Performance, John Van Reenen et al., January 2013
  • VIEW accompanying video here
  • Related links
    Swati Dhingra webpage
    Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
    Isabelle Roland webpage
    Thomas Sampson webpage
    Anna Valero webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    Monday 10 August 2015

    Building-Projects.co.uk: London faces skyscraper pressure unless planning laws change

    [Gabriel] Ahlfeldt, an Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science, says as long as outward growth is prevented by policies such as the 'green belt', the city will need to grow vertically as the population increases.

    This article was published online by Building-Projects.co.uk on August 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Also in:
    Social House Building & Maintenance
    London faces skyscraper pressure unless planning laws change
    Building Construction Design
    London faces skyscraper pressure unless planning laws change

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website



    Thursday 09 July 2015

    LSE British Politics and Policy blog: Summer budget: High hopes for the productivity plan - is enough being done?

    Article by Anna Valero
    In the 2015 summer budget, George Osborne at last identified the UK's productivity performance as an important issue that needs to be tackled. Here, Anna Valero reviews some of the measures ahead of further detail on the government's productivity plan due out tomorrow.
    The issue of productivity was left out of the March budget and somewhat ignored during the general election campaign - much to the dismay of economists, for whom weak productivity performance since the financial crisis is the number one problem facing the UK economy. Therefore, Osborne's post-election announcement that dealing with weak productivity would be a priority in this parliament was welcome news.

    This article was published by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on July 9, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015
    Further info here

    Related CEP video/podcast
    'Productivity and Business'. Interview with Anna Valero.
    Low productivity is probably the greatest challenge facing the UK economy.
    View video here

    Related links
    Anna Valero webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    Monday 06 July 2015

    London Essays: London's 'digital economy'

    Article by Max Nathan
    Despite the recent hype, London's digital sector appears to have shrunk since 2010, with much of the 2000s surge wiped out, and has only recently turned the corner.

    This article was published online by London Essays on July 6, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Dr Max Nathan webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website



    Monday 22 June 2015

    Chron: The Economist tallies the cost of excessive land-use regulation

    Similar work by Paul Cheshire and Christian Hilber, of the London School of Economics, estimated that in the early 2000s this regulatory shadow tax was roughly 300% in Milan and Paris, 450% in the City of London, and 800% in its West End. The lion's share of the value of commercial real estate in Europe's most economically important cities is thus attributable to rules that make building difficult.

    This article was published in the blog Chron on June 22, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Land use planning: the impact on retail productivity, Paul Cheshire, Christian Hilber and Ioannis Kaplanis. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 1, Summer 2011
    'Evaluating the Effects of Planning Policies on the Retail Sector: Or do Town Centre First Policies Deliver the Goods?', Paul Cheshire, Christian Hilber and Ioannis Kaplanis, Spatial Economics Research Centre Discussion Paper No.66, January 2011

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website



    Monday 22 June 2015

    BBC Coventry and Warwickshire: Shane O'Connor's Breakfast Show

    8.50am: live radio interview
    Dennis Novy interviewed, speaking about Greece and the looming IMF deadline.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC Coventry and Warwickshire on the Shane O'Connor Breakfast Show on June 22, 2015
    Link to broadcast here (about 1 hour 50 mins in)

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage

    Friday 19 June 2015

    TES News: ‘Encouraging a growth mindset is not just about boosting academic achievement'

    First Richard Layard, my colleague in the Lords, blogged about why schools should teach character as well as competence. Their research at the LSE, using the British Cohort Study, found that the strongest predictor of a satisfying adult life is a child's emotional health, and least important is academic achievement.

    This article was published online by Times Education Supplement (TES) on June 19, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    Thursday 18 June 2015

    Stern: Ein Blick zurück: Staatspleiten sind nicht so selten

    A look back: national bankruptcies are not so rare
    The economic historian Albrecht Ritschl called Germany the most wayward of the 20th century: ''The Federal Republic owes your today's financial stability and its status as a senior teacher of Europe alone the United States, who have renounced a lot of money in both after the first and after the second world war'', he said.

    This article was published online by Stern on June 18, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

    Related links
    Albrecht Ritschl webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    Sunday 14 June 2015

    BBC Radio 4: News

    Paul Cheshire discusses using limited amount of London's green belt for housing.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4 News on June 14, 2015
    [No link available.]

    Related Publications
    The Green Belt: A Place for Londoners?, by SERC, Quod and London First, published 24 February 2015
    Turning Houses into Gold: The Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Wednesday 10 June 2015

    Jersey Post: To text, or not to text in the classroom...?

    In fact, according to academics at the London School of Economics, the effect of banning mobile phones from school premises adds up to the equivalent of an extra week's schooling across the academic year.

    This article was published by the Jersey Evening Post (USA) on June 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    Tuesday 09 June 2015

    The Financial Times: UK property crisis scuppering aspiration

    Britain's politicians say they are keen to reward aspiration, but soaring house prices are a significant block to achieving this. Professor Christian Hilber, from the London School of Economics, explains to Ferdinando Giugliano how this can be fixed.

    This film was published by The Financial Times on June 9, 2015
    Link to interview here

    Related publications
    'UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research', Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing' - view here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Tuesday 02 June 2015

    Festival Economia Trento: Affari di famiglia: nepotismo politico e carriere nelle imprese italiane

    Marco Manacorda filmed giving a talk at the Festival of Economics on Trento.
    There is abundant anecdotal evidence but poor empirical evidence of the benefits enjoyed by the relatives of politicians in the labor market. Analysis of data about the universe of Italian politicians, combined with a sample of employees in the private sector, seems to confirm this hypothesis: the advantage in terms of career derived from having a political family is positive and significant. This phenomenon seems to be particularly pronounced where there is greater availability of public resources, and fades when the number of politicians competing for these resources is high and where the corruption evident are less common, suggesting that nepotism is a substitute for the pure corruption.

    The video was filmed for the Festival of Economics in Trento on June 2, 2015
    View the video here

    Related links
    Marco Manacorda webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    Tuesday 02 June 2015

    The Financial Times: Property puzzle

    Partly as a result London house prices per square foot are now the second highest in the world after Monaco, according to the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance. The problem is acute: the average UK home now costs a first-time buyer five times their income, up from 2.8 times in the early 1980s. That has in turn fuelled demand for rented accommodation, pushing up the costs and eating up increasing amounts of state subsidy.

    This article was published online by the Financial Times on June 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research, Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015

    Related CEP videos/podcasts
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing'
    View video here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website



    Tuesday 05 May 2015

    The Financial Times: Digital start-ups question links to 'Tech City'

    ''Our ambition is to bring together the creativity and energy of Shoreditch and the incredible possibilities of the Olympic Park to help make east London one of the world's great technology centres,'' Mr Cameron said in 2010. According to research by the London School of Economics and National Institute of Economic and Social Research, the number of digital jobs in the area climbed from 16,578 in 2012 to 18,679 in 2013. ''Policy has certainly hugely raised awareness of the London tech scene,'' says Max Nathan.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on May 5, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Max Nathan webpage
    Max Nathan publications webpage
    Spatial Economics Research website



    Tuesday 05 May 2015

    The Financial Times: Digital start-ups question links to 'Tech City'

    ''Our ambition is to bring together the creativity and energy of Shoreditch and the incredible possibilities of the Olympic Park to help make east London one of the world's great technology centres,'' Mr Cameron said in 2010. According to research by the London School of Economics and National Institute of Economic and Social Research, the number of digital jobs in the area climbed from 16,578 in 2012 to 18,679 in 2013. ''Policy has certainly hugely raised awareness of the London tech scene,'' says Max Nathan.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on May 5, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Max Nathan webpage
    Max Nathan publications webpage
    Spatial Economics Research website



    Tuesday 28 April 2015

    The Conversation: Fact Check: are disadvantaged young people 12 times less likely to go to university?

    The Conversation is fact checking political statements in the lead-up to the May UK general election. Statements are checked by an academic with expertise in the area. A second academic expert reviews an anonymous copy of the article.

    This analysis shows the very stark difference in the probability of going to university between young people from the most and least advantaged backgrounds. Depending on how one defines ''advantaged'', the least privileged are between three and six times less likely to go to university than the most privileged. And the gap is much larger if one only considers elite universities.

    One important point is that the gap is mostly explained by results at GCSE. So if we want the gap to be removed, more attention needs to be given to what impedes children from disadvantaged backgrounds from progressing up to age 16 - it is not mainly a question of improving access for 18 or 19-year-olds. This fact check supports the spirit of Ed Miliband's remarks, but not his actual numbers. It is a great illustration of the use to which the excellent English administrative data can be put by researchers. - Sandra McNally

    This article was published by The Conversation on April 28, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015
    A Question of Degree: The Effects of Degree Class on Labor Market Outcomes, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1221, May 2013
    CentrePiece Magazine Article In brief: University exam results matter, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013


    Related links
    Sandra McNally webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Tuesday 28 April 2015

    The Conversation: Fact Check: are disadvantaged young people 12 times less likely to go to university?

    The Conversation is fact checking political statements in the lead-up to the May UK general election. Statements are checked by an academic with expertise in the area. A second academic expert reviews an anonymous copy of the article.

    This analysis shows the very stark difference in the probability of going to university between young people from the most and least advantaged backgrounds. Depending on how one defines ''advantaged'', the least privileged are between three and six times less likely to go to university than the most privileged. And the gap is much larger if one only considers elite universities.

    One important point is that the gap is mostly explained by results at GCSE. So if we want the gap to be removed, more attention needs to be given to what impedes children from disadvantaged backgrounds from progressing up to age 16 - it is not mainly a question of improving access for 18 or 19-year-olds. This fact check supports the spirit of Ed Miliband's remarks, but not his actual numbers. It is a great illustration of the use to which the excellent English administrative data can be put by researchers. - Sandra McNally

    This article was published by The Conversation on April 28, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015
    A Question of Degree: The Effects of Degree Class on Labor Market Outcomes, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1221, May 2013
    CentrePiece Magazine Article In brief: University exam results matter, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013


    Related links
    Sandra McNally webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Monday 27 April 2015

    The Financial Times: Rent controls that aren't

    Both labour and its opponents make too much of a new policy
    Labour made two housing policy commitments over the weekend, only one of which was interesting. The uninteresting one was the promise to cut stamp duty for first-time buyers. That just aligns Labour with the coalition government in a silly rivalry for measures that help aspiring homeowners with one hand while pulling their goal out of reach with the other. In a supply-constrained market, the effect of demand subsidies (which all of these are) is just to drive up the price. That point is made in the best short guide to UK housing policy, a new election briefing from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on April 27, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research', Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing' - view here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website


    Monday 27 April 2015

    The Financial Times: Rent controls that aren't

    Both labour and its opponents make too much of a new policy
    Labour made two housing policy commitments over the weekend, only one of which was interesting. The uninteresting one was the promise to cut stamp duty for first-time buyers. That just aligns Labour with the coalition government in a silly rivalry for measures that help aspiring homeowners with one hand while pulling their goal out of reach with the other. In a supply-constrained market, the effect of demand subsidies (which all of these are) is just to drive up the price. That point is made in the best short guide to UK housing policy, a new election briefing from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on April 27, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research', Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing' - view here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website


    Monday 27 April 2015

    The Financial Times: Rent controls that aren't

    Both labour and its opponents make too much of a new policy
    Labour made two housing policy commitments over the weekend, only one of which was interesting. The uninteresting one was the promise to cut stamp duty for first-time buyers. That just aligns Labour with the coalition government in a silly rivalry for measures that help aspiring homeowners with one hand while pulling their goal out of reach with the other. In a supply-constrained market, the effect of demand subsidies (which all of these are) is just to drive up the price. That point is made in the best short guide to UK housing policy, a new election briefing from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on April 27, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research', Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing' - view here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website


    Tuesday 21 April 2015

    PC Pro: The upsides and downsides of Tech City

    As far as the government is concerned, London's Tech City is a success. But what effect has it had on employment in the area - and what are the downsides? The LSE's Dr Max Nathan is trying to find out what has worked and what hasn't.

    This article was published by PC Pro magazine on April 21, 2015
    View article here

    Related links
    Max Nathan webpage
    Max Nathan publications webpage
    Spatial Economics Research website



    Monday 02 March 2015

    The Telegraph: Renewables bill, Cost of going green 'won't turn industry away from Europe'

    The cost of subsidising the construction of more renewable energy won't deter industry from investing in Europe, according to a new study by the London School of Economics. ''Contrary to some claims, rises in energy prices do not have much effect on the global competitiveness of businesses,'' said Antoine Dechezlepretre, one of its authors. ''Even a sizeable difference in the price of energy relative to the rest of the world has only a very small impact on a country's imports and exports.''

    This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on March 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Asymmetric Industrial Energy Prices and International Trade', Antoine Dechezlepretre and Misato Sato, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1337, March 2015

    Related links
    Antoine Dechezlepretre webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


    Monday 02 March 2015

    The Telegraph: Renewables bill, Cost of going green 'won't turn industry away from Europe'

    The cost of subsidising the construction of more renewable energy won't deter industry from investing in Europe, according to a new study by the London School of Economics. ''Contrary to some claims, rises in energy prices do not have much effect on the global competitiveness of businesses,'' said Antoine Dechezlepretre, one of its authors. ''Even a sizeable difference in the price of energy relative to the rest of the world has only a very small impact on a country's imports and exports.''

    This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on March 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Asymmetric Industrial Energy Prices and International Trade', Antoine Dechezlepretre and Misato Sato, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1337, March 2015

    Related links
    Antoine Dechezlepretre webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


    Monday 02 March 2015

    The Telegraph: Renewables bill, Cost of going green 'won't turn industry away from Europe'

    The cost of subsidising the construction of more renewable energy won't deter industry from investing in Europe, according to a new study by the London School of Economics. ''Contrary to some claims, rises in energy prices do not have much effect on the global competitiveness of businesses,'' said Antoine Dechezlepretre, one of its authors. ''Even a sizeable difference in the price of energy relative to the rest of the world has only a very small impact on a country's imports and exports.''

    This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on March 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Asymmetric Industrial Energy Prices and International Trade', Antoine Dechezlepretre and Misato Sato, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1337, March 2015

    Related links
    Antoine Dechezlepretre webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


    Friday 27 February 2015

    The Evening Standard: More houses would be a better use of London land than golf courses

    The stereotype of concrete London is misleading: a fifth of all land in the Greater London Authority is green belt, according to a report by the London School of Economics, business group London First and planning firm Quod. In some boroughs, it's half. But only about a quarter of the capital's green belt is the kind of land we might expect: parks dedicated to public access, or environmentally-protected habitats. Of the rest, 76 per cent is used for agriculture, and derelict buildings such as historic hospitals and water treatment works.

    This article was published in The Evening Standard on February 27, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    The Green Belt: A Place for Londoners?, by SERC, Quod and London First, published 24 February 2015
    Turning Houses into Gold: The Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Monday 23 February 2015

    Mail online: How do YOU think NHS money should be spent? Boob jobs, liver transplants for alcoholics or vital support for dementia patients? New TV show asks the public for their view

    Can the NHS cope with the rapid rise in dementia patients? Ros is one of 670,000 carers, but she needs help - £350 will provide a support nurse
    Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said: 'One of the biggest numbers we should worry about is the number of people who have dementia now in the UK, it is estimated at more than 800,000'.

    This article was published in the Mail online on February 23, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Friday 06 February 2015

    LSE showcases SERC Impact Case Studies: Research Impact site launched

    LSE has launched a Research Impact site which showcases how researchers at the School have worked with policymakers and communities around the world, and gathers together Impact Case Studies from the 2014 REF .

    SERC has two case studies placed front and centre on the site. The first looks at how SERC has influenced urban economic policy in the UK, both in central Government and working with cities like Manchester. The second focuses on Paul Cheshire’s research on land use planning , which has highlighted the economic effects of the UK planning system and helped drive national debates on housing, the green belt and town centre first policies.

    Thursday 05 February 2015

    The Financial Times: The solution to England's housing crisis lies in the green belt

    Building an economy upon a massive and growing distortion in the market for land is foolish
    In a recent paper, Christian Hilber of the London School of Economics and Wouter Vermeulen of the Netherlands bureau for economic policy analysis, note that real house prices have grown faster in the UK over the past 40 years than in any other member of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Prices, particularly in London and the South East, are among the highest in the world. In the absence of controls, real prices would have risen by around 90 per cent between 1974 and 2008, instead of 190 per cent. ... Paul Cheshire of the LSE even argues that these policies have made houses more similar to art or gold than to humble dwellings.

    This article was published by the Financial Times on February 5, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England', Christian A.L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, SERC Discussion Paper No.119, September 2012
    Turning Houses into Gold: The Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Monday 02 February 2015

    The Sunday Telegraph: Playing with political fire

    Professor Luis Garicano from the London School of Economics says it is Syriza that has misjudged badly, both by teaming up in coalition with a virulently anti-German party, and by violating Troika terms across the board – halting privatisation, raising the minimum wage to €750 a month, re-hiring 10,000 civil servants, and blocking mortgage foreclosures. “Tsipras is slapping the Germans in the face: it is almost as if he wishes to be thrown out of Europe. I can’t see any political support for Syriza from any government in southern Europe. They are all terrified of their own populist movements,” he says.

    This article appeared in The Telegraph on 2 February 2015 link to article

    Related Links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Thursday 29 January 2015

    The Economist (web): The paradox of the ghetto

    Britain has prized the ideal of economically mixed neighbourhoods since the 19th century. Poverty and disadvantage are intensified when poor people cluster, runs the argument; conversely, the rich are unfairly helped when they are surrounded by other rich people. Social mixing ought to help the poor. It sounds self-evident - and colours planning regulations that ensure much social and affordable housing is dotted among more expensive private homes. Yet ''there is absolutely no serious evidence to support this,'' says Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics (LSE).

    This article was published online by The Economist on January 29, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire here
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website
    Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage

    Tuesday 27 January 2015

    Real Estate Business: Sydney property prices almost 10 times income

    Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics refers to a "fatal mismatch between the operational concepts of demand and supply in markets and the parallel concepts with which the planning system works." “As noted above, younger households are among the most significantly victimised by the housing affordability losses,” he said. “The lucky ones will inherit homes from their parents – which is a big step away from legendary urbanologist Sir Peter Hall's ‘ideal of a property-owning democracy’,” he said.

    This article appeared in Real Estate Business on 27 January 2015 link to article

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre webpage

    Tuesday 27 January 2015

    Real Estate Business: Sydney property prices almost 10 times income

    Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics refers to a "fatal mismatch between the operational concepts of demand and supply in markets and the parallel concepts with which the planning system works." “As noted above, younger households are among the most significantly victimised by the housing affordability losses,” he said. “The lucky ones will inherit homes from their parents – which is a big step away from legendary urbanologist Sir Peter Hall's ‘ideal of a property-owning democracy’,” he said.

    This article appeared in Real Estate Business on 27 January 2015 link to article

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre webpage

    Wednesday 21 January 2015

    Conservativehome: The three way fight for the future of the Green Belt

    Consider the example of planning policy. On one side of the barricades, there are those opposed to new development - perhaps not in general, but certainly when it comes to any specific attempt to build much-needed new housing. Lined up against them is the pro-development lobby who want to see the existing restrictions on new-build swept away. Looking on a map the biggest such restriction is the Green Belt - which the radicals want to get rid of. Their arguments are neatly encapsulated in a piece for City AM by Ben Southwood, who makes a number of interesting points:
    ''According to LSE professor Paul Cheshire, new build houses are about 40 per cent bigger in the Netherlands and 38 per cent bigger in Germany than they are in England. And yet housing goes for 45 per cent less per square metre in the Netherlands and, in Germany, prices did not rise throughout the entire 1971 to 2002 period ''

    This article was published online by Conservativehome on January 21, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre webpage

    Saturday 10 January 2015

    El Confidencial: La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

    Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

    This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
    Link here

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Saturday 10 January 2015

    El Confidencial: La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

    Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

    This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
    Link here

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Tuesday 09 December 2014

    Mail Online UK: Wind farms 'have no significant effect' on house prices, claims study

    This research, which was recently published in the journal Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics, is the first peer-reviewed study on the subject. It contradicts research earlier this year by the London School of Economics (LSE) which found that values of homes within 1.2 miles (1.9km) of large wind farms were being slashed by about 11 per cent.

    This article appeared in the Mail Online on 9 December 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices, Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014
    Gone with the Wind Stephen Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014

    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 09 December 2014

    Mail Online UK: Wind farms 'have no significant effect' on house prices, claims study

    This research, which was recently published in the journal Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics, is the first peer-reviewed study on the subject. It contradicts research earlier this year by the London School of Economics (LSE) which found that values of homes within 1.2 miles (1.9km) of large wind farms were being slashed by about 11 per cent.

    This article appeared in the Mail Online on 9 December 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices, Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014
    Gone with the Wind Stephen Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014

    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Sunday 07 December 2014

    Londonist: Things to do in London: Monday 8 December 2014

    LONDON GREENBELT: The London Society was instrumental in formulating London's Green Belt in the 20th century. Tonight, near Farringdon, it hosts a debate about the future of London's Green Belt with Jonathan Manns on behalf of the Society, Paul Cheshire from London School of Economics and David Knight from Royal College of Art.

    This article was published by the Londonist on December 7, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website

    Friday 28 November 2014

    SpyGhana: There are over 70,000 hidden ICT companies in UK

    The United Kingdom has discovered that its Information Economy industries could be 42 per cent larger than current estimates, with at least 70,000 extra ICT-producing companies recently captured in a recent data find operating in hotspots across the country. This was contained in new research published by Dr Max Nathan and Dr Anna Rosso at NIESR, alongside Francois Bouet at Growth Intelligence and funded by Nesta. Using 'big data' the report sets out alternative counts of firms in the Government's 'Information Economy' industries, and compares these to estimates using conventional industry codes.

    This article was published by SpyGhana on November 28, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Mapping Information Economy Businesses with Big Data: Findings for the UK', Max Nathan and Anna Rosso, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.44, December 2014

    Related links
    Max Nathan webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Thursday 20 November 2014

    O Globo Online - blog: Homens ficam mais altos em democracia do que em regime comunista

    Men are taller in a democracy than if grown up in a communist regime
    ''Men who grow up in a democracy tend to be taller than those who have lived their first 20 years of life under a Communist regime.'' The assertion may seem strange to those who read. But this is one of the findings of a survey conducted by political economists at the London School of Economics (LSE), Joan Costa-Font and Lucia Kossarova.

    This article was published by the blog O Globo online on November 20, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications and videos
    'Anthropometric Dividends of Czechoslovakia's break up' by Dr Joan Costa-i-Font and Dr Lucia Kossarova, is available here
    'Joan Costa-i-Font: The Link between Democracy and Height'. Video link here

    Related links
    Joan Costa-i-Font webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Friday 14 November 2014

    The Times: The growing love affair with a park

    A team of researchers from Imperial College Business School and LSE found that property prices across the UK increase on average by about 3 per cent when internet speed doubles.

    This article was published by The Times on November 14, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways Speed', Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper No.161, July 2014

    Related Links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Thursday 13 November 2014

    Prospect Magazine: Will Britain get a payrise?

    What if in our relatively deregulated flexible labour market-where the balance of workplace power favours bosses, many people are engaged on flexible performance-based contracts, and new technology is sweeping away jobs that once paid well-there will never be a return to the days when workers of every type could always rely on a pay rise? Economists such as David Blanchflower, one-time member of the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee, and Stephen Machin, who currently sits on the Low Pay Commission which makes recommendations on the level of the hourly minimum wage, point to the experience of the United States, which gave us the blueprint for labour market de-regulation. The real median weekly wage for full-time US employees has more or less flatlined since the 1970s, proving that pay stagnation is not beyond the realm of possibility. ...

    As two of Britain's leading labour market economists Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin outlined in a report published by the Resolution Foundation, a think tank, far less unemployment is now needed to bear down on inflationary wage and price pressures. ...

    A flexible labour market that favours jobs over pay during tough times is clearly preferable to one that results in the economic and social pain of mass unemployment. Better still, if the economic recovery is sustained long enough to combine a continued fall in unemployment with strengthening productivity growth, we could be on the verge of the kind of labour market scenario George Osborne must dream of: full employment and rising real living standards. However, this positive picture doesn't necessarily translate into an equally rosy outlook for pay. One reason, as research by John van Reenan, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, has shown, is that even when productivity rises employers are nowadays more likely to improve non-wage elements of reward packages-which include contributions to staff pensions and health insurance, plus employers' national insurance contributions-at the expense of pay increases.



    This article was published by Prospect Magazine on November 13, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    What a drag: the chilling impact of unemployment on real wages, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Resolution Foundation Report, September 2012
    'Decoupling of wage growth and productivity growth? Myth and reality', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1246, October 2013
    Wage growth and productivity growth: the myth and reality of 'decoupling', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Magazine, Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013

    Related links
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Tuesday 11 November 2014

    Herald Scotland: We need to plan better for precious years of childhood

    The new understanding that childhood emotional wellbeing is key to a fulfilled adulthood comes from the Wellbeing research programme at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance. Its study analysed data from around 9,000 people over 40 years.

    This article was published by the Herald Scotland on November 11, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-Course Model of Well-Being', Andrew E. Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1245, October 2013
    What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-Course Model of Well-Being, Richard Layard, Andrew Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, Economic Journal, Feature Issue, Vol. 124, Issue 580, pp. F720-F738, November 2014

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Andrew Clark webpage
    Francesca Cornaglia webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    Friday 07 November 2014

    Public Radio International: Would health care reform stifle innovation?

    Zack Cooper discusses whether US efforts to reform health care could mean a loss of medical innovation for the rest of the world.

    This interview was broadcast on Public Radio International on November 7, 2014
    Link to interview here

    Related Links
    Zack Cooper webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage
    Zack Cooper CEP publications webpage

    Thursday 06 November 2014

    BBC South: News

    Paul Cheshire discusses housing affordability and need to build new housing.

    This interview was broadcast by BBC South on November 6, 2014
    (no link available)

    Also on:
    BBC Radio Oxford

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website
    Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage

    Friday 24 October 2014

    Mail Online UK: High speed rail 'tsar' to spark fresh controversy with new HS2 route and stations recommendations

    A panel of academic experts told the Treasury select committee that the report overstated the benefits by six to eight times. Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, who is to give evidence to the committee on Tuesday, said findings used a procedure that was 'essentially made up'.

    This article appeared in the Daily Mail on October 24, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits Henry Overman, February 2012 Paper No' CEPCP361 in CentrePiece Vol. 16 Issue. 3 Winter

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC webpage
    Globalisation webpage

    Wednesday 22 October 2014

    The Daily Telegraph: X factor over evidence: the failure of early years education

    Article by Jo Blanden
    As free nursery places for three year olds fail to deliver lasting educational benefits, Dr Jo Blanden argues we need to see a sensible approach to early years policy.

    This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on October 22, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Jo Blanden CEP Publications webpage

    Monday 20 October 2014

    British Politics and Policy Blog - LSE: Gone with the wind: house prices are negatively affected where turbines are visible

    Wind turbines are generally popular as a source of green energy but face considerable opposition from the people who have to live near them. Steve Gibbons uses local property markets as a way to value the visual impact of wind farms and finds significant negative effects on house prices in postcodes where the turbines are visible.

    This article was posted online by the LSE's British Politics and Policy blog on October 20, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014
    Gone with the Wind, Stephen Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014

    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Sunday 19 October 2014

    The Observer: Is it time to rethink Britain's green belt?

    Professor Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics, has written that ''the unstoppable damage they do to societal fairness, housing affordability, the economic efficiency of our cities, even the environment, is devastating''. He argues that new houses in Britain are 40 percent more expensive than the Netherlands, which is more densely populated, and that the green belt is at least partly to blame.

    This article was published in The Observer on October 19, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications and films
    Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis, LSE film. Also available to view on You Tube - Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website


    Thursday 16 October 2014

    Britain News.Net: Vince Cables golf course plan fails to hook critics

    Alluding to research from the London School of Economics, which showed more of Surrey if devoted to golf courses than housing, Dr Cable said if he was in a middle-income family struggling to find a home in the county, he would ask ''is a golf course sacred or are there better uses of the land?''

    This article was published online by Britain News.Net on October 16, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications and films
    Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis, LSE film. Also available to view on You Tube - Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website


    Tuesday 14 October 2014

    DiarioLibre.com: Es la ''crisis de la mediana edad'' solo una excusa?

    Is the mid-life crisis just an excuse?
    However, a study published earlier this year found that an average decrease of subjective happiness, or welfare as described by economists in middle age, between 40 and 42 years occurs. Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee, coauthor of the longitudinal research conducted in three countries, said that this confirms previous studies showing a relationship between age and the use of antidepressants. ...
    Dr. Hannes Schwandt, Princeton University, believes midlife, unlike childhood and old age, has not been investigated. Last year, he published the research focused on the ''unfulfilled expectations''. It was found that young people are optimistic perhaps even ''too optimistic'' - while those in their forties and fifties feel repentance before they feel at peace with themselves in older age. ''Maybe people of middle age can learn from the elderly, who are less regretful and more accepting'' he suggests. ...
    Paul Dolan, professor of behavioral science at the London School of Economics and author of Happiness by Design believes we need a mix of purpose and pleasure to feel truly happy. In a future article, argues that much of the economic literature on midlife crisis centers on our assessments of what makes us happy rather than our actual experiences. In other words, the stories we tell ourselves about what makes us happy, which a prestigious job is good- even depress us our daily experience of this work.

    This article was published online by DiarioLibre.com on October 14, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    'Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing', Hannes Schwandt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1229, July 2013
    Happiness by Design: Finding pleasure and purpose in everyday life, Paul Dolan, Allen Lane, August 2014, ISBN 9780241003107 Details

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Hannes Schwandt webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Tuesday 14 October 2014

    Adam Smith Institute Blog: Tired of London?

    As the LSE’s Paul Cheshire points out, politicians haven’t stepped up to the plate. The coalitions’ Help to Buy policies are doing little (except pushing up prices), while Labour’s suggestion for partial controls on rents, increased security of tenure, and elimination of agent’s fees for finding housing for renters, will probably just decrease rental supply as fewer people want to become landlords.

    This article appeared in the Adam Smith Blog on 14 October 2014 link to article

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website
    Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage

    Tuesday 14 October 2014

    Golf Business News: Cable Off Line With Golf Comments Says PGA Chief

    The Business Secretary’s comments came in relation to research by the London School of Economics that claimed more of Surrey is devoted to golf courses than housing with a total of 103 courses in the county.

    This article appeared in link to article

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website


    Tuesday 14 October 2014

    hacked by Rizgar halshoy kurdish hacker: hacked by Rizgar halshoy kurdish hacker

    Vince Cable's in trouble for suggesting we build on golf courses. The business secretary was referring to research by the London School of Economics showing that more of Surrey is devoted to golf than housing.

    This article appeared in the Times on 14 October 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Tuesday 14 October 2014

    hacked by Rizgar halshoy kurdish hacker: hacked by Rizgar halshoy kurdish hacker

    Vince Cable's in trouble for suggesting we build on golf courses. The business secretary was referring to research by the London School of Economics showing that more of Surrey is devoted to golf than housing.

    This article appeared in the Times on 14 October 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Friday 10 October 2014

    Clarin: No va mas...quien ganara el Nobel de Economia?

    Veronica Rappoport of the Centre for Economic Performance comments on her choice to be recipient(s) of this year's Nobel Prize for Economics:
    ''At some point should touch the area of economic growth: Romer, Aghion and perhaps Barro I would love a prize for. Holmstrom and Tirole.''

    This article was published online by Clarin on October 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Veronica Rappoport webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Friday 10 October 2014

    Clarin: No va mas...quien ganara el Nobel de Economia?

    Veronica Rappoport of the Centre for Economic Performance comments on her choice to be recipient(s) of this year's Nobel Prize for Economics:
    ''At some point should touch the area of economic growth: Romer, Aghion and perhaps Barro I would love a prize for. Holmstrom and Tirole.''

    This article was published online by Clarin on October 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Veronica Rappoport webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Thursday 09 October 2014

    World Economic Forum: Why busts hurt more than booms help

    Article by Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Michael I. Norton
    We find evidence that the life satisfaction of individuals is between two and eight times more sensitive to negative growth as compared to positive economic growth. People do not psychologically benefit from expansions nearly as much as they suffer from recessions. These results suggest that policymakers seeking to raise wellbeing should focus more on preventing busts than inculcating booms. Our results also offer an explanation for why increases in GDP do not always pay off in increases in happiness - the modest happiness gains accrued over years of growth can be wiped out by just a single year of contraction.

    This article was published online by the World Economic Forum on October 9, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications and films
    The untold story of the recession: the psychological cost
    The psychological cost of a few years of recession can wipe out the benefits of many years of growth. Jan-Emmanuel De Neve of the Centre for Economic Performance explains his latest research on the effect of the recent recession on people's wellbeing.
    View here.

    'Individual Experience of Positive and Negative Growth is Asymmetric: Evidence from Subjective Well-being Data', Femke De Keulenaer, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, Georgios Kavetsos, Michael I. Norton, Bert Van Landeghem and George W. Ward, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1304, October 2014


    Related links
    Jan-Emmanuel De Neve webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Wednesday 08 October 2014

    The Times: Build homes on golf courses, suggests Cable

    New homes should be built on golf courses in an attempt to solve the housing crisis, Vince Cable has suggested. ... Dr Cable was responding to a study by the London School of Economics which suggested that more of Surrey was used for golf courses than housing.

    This article was published by The Times on October 8, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related articles
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Tuesday 30 September 2014

    The McKinsey Quarterly: Why management matters for productivity

    Article by John Dowdy and John Van Reenen
    While government policy will play a key role, the actions of managers and their organizations will decisively influence the realization of global productivity potential in the years ahead.

    This article was published online by the McKinsey Quarterly on September 30, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Management Practices Across Firms and Countries', Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011
    Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter, Nicholas Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, July 2007

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Management Practices and Organisational Structures research webpage

    Tuesday 30 September 2014

    The McKinsey Quarterly: Why management matters for productivity

    Article by John Dowdy and John Van Reenen
    While government policy will play a key role, the actions of managers and their organizations will decisively influence the realization of global productivity potential in the years ahead.

    This article was published online by the McKinsey Quarterly on September 30, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Management Practices Across Firms and Countries', Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011
    Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter, Nicholas Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, July 2007

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Management Practices and Organisational Structures research webpage

    Friday 19 September 2014

    Financial Times: Pay pressure

    Prof John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, notes that average workers have been hit hardest. “Over time non-manual jobs have found their tasks taken over by computers and robots. Think of bank clerks and ATM machines,” he says. In Japan, it is the young who have been hurt worst as the traditional salaried jobs in big companies dwindled.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 19 September 2014 link to article

    Related Publications In brief - New technology: who wins, who loses? John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun, May 2014, Paper No' CEPCP418, CentrePiece 19 (1) Spring2014 pages: 6-7
    The Distinct Effects of Information Technology and Communication Technology on Firm Organisation Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No. 927, May 2009, Revised June 2013

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage

    Friday 19 September 2014

    Financial Times: Pay pressure

    Prof John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, notes that average workers have been hit hardest. “Over time non-manual jobs have found their tasks taken over by computers and robots. Think of bank clerks and ATM machines,” he says. In Japan, it is the young who have been hurt worst as the traditional salaried jobs in big companies dwindled.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 19 September 2014 link to article

    Related Publications In brief - New technology: who wins, who loses? John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun, May 2014, Paper No' CEPCP418, CentrePiece 19 (1) Spring2014 pages: 6-7
    The Distinct Effects of Information Technology and Communication Technology on Firm Organisation Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No. 927, May 2009, Revised June 2013

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage

    Friday 19 September 2014

    Financial Times: Pay pressure

    Prof John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, notes that average workers have been hit hardest. “Over time non-manual jobs have found their tasks taken over by computers and robots. Think of bank clerks and ATM machines,” he says. In Japan, it is the young who have been hurt worst as the traditional salaried jobs in big companies dwindled.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 19 September 2014 link to article

    Related Publications In brief - New technology: who wins, who loses? John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun, May 2014, Paper No' CEPCP418, CentrePiece 19 (1) Spring2014 pages: 6-7
    The Distinct Effects of Information Technology and Communication Technology on Firm Organisation Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No. 927, May 2009, Revised June 2013

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage

    Thursday 18 September 2014

    The Economist: Paying the field

    Some boosters point to studies, such as that by Gabriel Ahlfeldt of the London School of Economics, which show that house prices increase more rapidly in the vicinity of a new stadium.

    This article appeared in The Economist on 18 September 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Form or function?: the impact of new football stadia on property prices in London Ahlfeldt, Gabriel M. and Kavetsos, SERC Discussion Papers , 87

    Related Links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC webpage

    Wednesday 17 September 2014

    The Financial Times: Scottish separation represents a gamble with very poor odds

    In a letter to the Financial Times, academics from Scotland and England warn that separation is a gamble with very poor odds. Professor John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance; Professor Mike Elsby, Mr Nick Oulton and Dr Kevin Sheedy, Associates of CEP plus Felix Koenig, an Occasional Research Assistant with CEP were co-signees.

    The letter was printed in the Financial Times on September 17, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Mike Elsby webpage
    Felix Koenig webpage
    Nick Oulton webpage
    Kevin Sheedy webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    Macro Programme webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


    Wednesday 17 September 2014

    The Financial Times: Scottish separation represents a gamble with very poor odds

    In a letter to the Financial Times, academics from Scotland and England warn that separation is a gamble with very poor odds. Professor John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance; Professor Mike Elsby, Mr Nick Oulton and Dr Kevin Sheedy, Associates of CEP plus Felix Koenig, an Occasional Research Assistant with CEP were co-signees.

    The letter was printed in the Financial Times on September 17, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Mike Elsby webpage
    Felix Koenig webpage
    Nick Oulton webpage
    Kevin Sheedy webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    Macro Programme webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


    Tuesday 16 September 2014

    City A.M.: Planning liberalisation is the closest thing there is to an economic silver bullet

    Liberalisation of planning could therefore lower house prices and rents directly, and there would be a direct boost to building growth. But the real gains would come through a fall in the cost burden associated with property. For sectors like childcare, social care, restaurants and even many office-based industries, high rents and property prices raise prices for consumers, with a dynamic strain on our growth prospects brought about by a reduction in competition and innovation. This is especially true in the retail sector, where planning laws, supplemented with ''town centre first'' policies, have led to much smaller stores than in countries like the US. On conservative assumptions, Paul Cheshire from the LSE has estimated that the effects of these self-induced policies may have lowered productivity in the retail sector by as much as 20 per cent - raising the cost of our shopping directly, while depressing the wages of the often low-skilled employees in the sector.

    This article was published by City A.M. on September 16, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website
    Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage

    Wednesday 10 September 2014

    The Independent: Spiralling costs of dementia 'being unfairly picked up by carers'

    LSE professor of social policy Martin Knapp said many people with dementia and their families are essentially paying out £21,000 a year through the unpaid care provided by carers and covering the costs of social care.

    This article appeared in the Independent on 10 September 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    Monday 08 September 2014

    British Science Festival: CEP Session on Economics of Inequality

    On Monday 8 September 2014, CEP hosted the only economics session in the British Science Festival. Presenting their work on the "Economics of Inquality" were John Van Reenen on the 99%; Brian Bell on Top Pay of the 1% and Barbara Petrongolo on Gender. Members of the public listened and discussed the findings with the presenters at the University of Birmingham.

    Link to British Science Festival website

     



    Monday 08 September 2014

    British Science Festival: CEP Session on Economics of Inequality

    On Monday 8 September 2014, CEP hosted the only economics session in the British Science Festival. Presenting their work on the "Economics of Inquality" were John Van Reenen on the 99%; Brian Bell on Top Pay of the 1% and Barbara Petrongolo on Gender. Members of the public listened and discussed the findings with the presenters at the University of Birmingham.

    Link to British Science Festival website

     



    Sunday 07 September 2014

    The Sunday Telegraph: Garden cities 'not housing solution

    The number of homes to be created – 15,000 – will account for less than 1pc of the UK’s requirement, according to Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the LSE. Mr Cheshire warned that undersupply of housing risks “more volatility in the economy”, as a more turbulent housing sector poses increased risks to the financial system.

    This article appeared in the Sunday Telegraph on 7 September 2014 link to article

    Also in: Remortgage.com

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Saturday 30 August 2014

    ISPreview: Estate Agent Claims Slow Broadband Can Wipe 25% off UK House Values

    A recent study by LSE and the Imperial College Business School, which examined 15 years’ worth of data to identify the impact of faster Internet access on UK house prices, concluded that property prices increase by an average of around 3% when the available broadband speeds doubled.

    This article appeared in ISPreview on 30 August 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways Speed Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis, Tommaso Valletti, July 2014, Paper No' SERCDP0161

    Related Links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC webpage

    Saturday 30 August 2014

    Coventry Evening Telegraph: To Do List

    PAUL DOLAN, a Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics, takes a cool, scientific look at how we can organise our lives to put more joy into them in Happiness By Design (Allen Lane, priced £20/ebook £8.03). Happiness, he says Dolan, lies in finding the right mix of pleasure and purpose - the feeling that what we're doing is worthwhile. For him, becoming happier is more to do with making small adjustments to what we do, rather than big changes - chatting to a stranger to liven up a boring queue, setting up out-of-office emails that make us laugh, minimising distractions - can mean more happiness.

    This article appeared in the Coventry Evening Telegraph on August 30, 2014 (no link available)

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing webpage


    Monday 18 August 2014

    Finanzen.net: Europas Jugend hängt finanziell am Tropf

    Indem sie ihren Kindern finanziell unter die Arme greifen, haben die Eltern auch unabsichtlich den offentlichen Druck entscharft, die Beschäftigungs-und Renten so zu andern, dass ihre Kinder einen leichteren Start ins Berufsleben bekommen, sagt Luis Garicano, spanischer Wirtschaftsprofessor an der London School of Economics.
    By helping their children financially, the parents have also unwittingly also blunted public pressure for changes to labour rules and pension rights that could make it easier for their children to get a start, says Luis Garicano, a prominent Spanish economist at the London School of Economics.

    This article was published online by Finanzen.net on August 18, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage

    Sunday 17 August 2014

    The Independent: David Blanchflower: The Bank now admits pay growth is going to be poor. They should have listened to me

    The MPC’s forecasts on what would happen to wage growth have been poor once again. They refused to listen to commentators like my friends David Bell from the University of Stirling and Steve Machin from University College London and the Centre for Economic Performance and myself, who told them there was much more slack in the labour market than they thought and real wages weren’t set to rise any time soon. But they wouldn’t listen and now look at the fine mess they have gotten themselves into.

    This article appeared in the Independent on 17 August 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Steve Machin webpage
    Labour Markets webpage

    Monday 11 August 2014

    City AM: Make Yourself at Home

    Without the regulatory constraints imposed on our housing market, between 1974 and 2008, average house prices would have risen from £79,000 to £147,000, rather than to £226,000. That's according to a new report by Christian Hilber of the LSE and Wouter Vermeulen of UV University that looks at the impact of supply constraints on house prices in England.

    This article appeared on 11 August 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    SERC webpage

    Wednesday 06 August 2014

    Daily Telegraph: Why UK house prices have grown faster than anywhere else

    Christian A. L. Hilber of the London School of Economics and Wouter Vermeulen of the CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis have just produced a dispassionate analysis of the problem, which will be published shortly in the Economic Journal. They find that house prices in England would have risen by about 100 percentage points fewer, after adjusting for consumer price inflation, from 1974 to 2008, in the absence of regulatory constraints to housebuilding. In other words, they would have shot up from £79,000 to £147,000, instead of £226,000. Another way of putting this is that prices would have been 35pc cheaper.

    This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 6 August 2014 link to article

    Also in: Yahoo! UK and Ireland

    Related Links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    SERC webpage

    Tuesday 05 August 2014

    Broadband Properties Magazine: Internet Speed Closely Linked to Property Values

    Homeowners in London are willing to pay up to 8 percent above the market price for properties in areas offering very fast Internet speeds, according to a new study. The capital’s willingness to pay a premium for good Internet coverage strengthens the case for roll-out of high-speed broadband in densely populated areas, argue researchers from LSE and Imperial College Business School. In the first study of its kind, researchers have analyzed the value of broadband to English households, looking at the link between property prices and broadband availability. Statistics compiled over a 15-year period, from 1995-2010, show that property prices across the UK increase on average by about 3 percent when Internet speed doubles.

    This article appeared in Broadband Properties Magazine on 5 August 2014 link to article

    Also in:
    Individual.com - 'London home owners pay premium for fast internet - study'
    Xataka - Si quieres que tu casa se revalorice, instala fibra óptica

    Related Publications
    Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis, Tommaso Valletti, July 2014, Paper No' SERCDP0161

    Related Links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC webpage

    Tuesday 05 August 2014

    SERC Blog by Gabriel Ahlfeldt: How to roll out high speed broadband in Britain

    We find that property prices increase on average by about 3 per cent when internet speed doubles. Importantly, there are diminishing returns to speed. While the increase in value is even greater when starting from slow internet connections, an increase in nominal speed from 8 to 24 megabits per second raises the property value by no more than 1%. Another main finding is that the consumer surplus differs substantially across regions. It is highest in high income areas that are highly urbanized. As an example, the consumer surplus in London is almost twice as high as in any other of the English regions, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons.

    This article appeared on the SERC Blog on 5 August 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis, Tommaso Valletti, July 2014, Paper No' SERCDP0161

    Related Links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC webpage

    Tuesday 05 August 2014

    Xataka: Si quieres que tu casa se revalorice, instala fibra óptica

    In translation:

    The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) along with the Imperial College Business School have conducted a curious study that analyzed the evolution of the price of more than one million homes in the United Kingdom over 15 years.
    What conclusions have been obtained? Because that apart from housing bubbles, homes with better Internet connection is put on sale for a higher price. For the study they have compared homes in the same area with similar features but with different qualities and speed access to Internet.

    This article was published by Xataka on August 5, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper No.161, July 2014

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC website


    Tuesday 05 August 2014

    Individual.com: 'London home owners pay premium for fast internet - study'

    Home owners in London are willing to pay up to 8 percent above the market price for properties in areas offering very fast internet speeds, according to new research from the London School of Economics (LSE) and Imperial College Business School. The researchers argue that this willingness to pay a premium for good internet coverage strengthens the case for roll-out of high speed broadband in densely populated areas. Data compiled over a 15-year period, from 1995-2010, show that property prices across the UK increase on average by about 3 percent when internet speed doubles. Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons.

    This article was published online by Individual.com on August 5, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper No.161, July 2014

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC website


    Tuesday 05 August 2014

    Broadband Communities - News and Views: Internet speed closely linked to property values

    Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons. ''Speed matters,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, associate professor of urban economics and land development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''The European Commission has set a target by 2020 that every European citizen will need access to at least 30 Mbps and at least 50 percent of households should subscribe to Internet connections above 100 Mbps.''

    This article was published online by Broadband Communities - News and Views on August 5, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper No.161, July 2014

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC website


    Tuesday 05 August 2014

    The Telegraph: Why UK house prices have grown faster than anywhere else

    House prices have grown faster in England since late 1973 than almost all other European countries. So what is going on? The problem is clearly that there is too little supply, given the demand and the growing population. But why? There are two possible kinds of constraints. The first are regulatory: ... The second kind are natural and physical: a scarcity of land, for example, or an uneven topography that makes it very hard to build. So which of the two factors are most important in the case of the UK? And what would happen to prices in their absence? Christian A. L. Hilber of the London School of Economics and Wouter Vermeulen of the CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis have just produced a dispassionate analysis of the problem, which will be published shortly in the Economic Journal.

    This article was published by The Telegraph on August 5, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England', Christian A.L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, SERC Discussion Paper No.119, September 2012 (revised 2014).

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    SERC website


    Monday 04 August 2014

    Daily Express: Want to add three per cent to the value of house? Get better broadband

    Doubling your internet speed could add around three per cent to the value of your home, says a new report out today. The London School of Economics and Political Science and the Imperial College Business School have looked at 15 years’ worth of data and discovered how broadband speeds affect house prices. Their research found that homes with fast connections were, on average, worth more than those with slower speeds.

    This article appeared in the Daily Express on 4 August 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis, Tommaso Valletti, July 2014, Paper No' SERCDP0161

    Related Links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC webpage

    Also in:
    Thinkbroadband
    Cable.co.uk
    Telecompaper
    ISPreview UK
    TMC Net
    USwitch.com

    Thursday 31 July 2014

    LSE News online: Internet speed closely linked to property values

    Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons. ''Speed matters,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''The European Commission has set a target by 2020 that every European citizen will need access to at least 30 megabits per second and at least 50 per cent of households should subscribe to internet connections above 100 megabits per second.''

    This press release was posted online on July 31, 2014
    Link to press release here

    Related publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper no.161, July 2014

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC website


    Thursday 31 July 2014

    LSE News online: Internet speed closely linked to property values

    Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons. ''Speed matters,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''The European Commission has set a target by 2020 that every European citizen will need access to at least 30 megabits per second and at least 50 per cent of households should subscribe to internet connections above 100 megabits per second.''

    This press release was posted online on July 31, 2014
    Link to press release here

    Related publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper no.161, July 2014

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC website


    Thursday 31 July 2014

    LSE News online: Internet speed closely linked to property values

    Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons. ''Speed matters,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''The European Commission has set a target by 2020 that every European citizen will need access to at least 30 megabits per second and at least 50 per cent of households should subscribe to internet connections above 100 megabits per second.''

    This press release was posted online on July 31, 2014
    Link to press release here

    Related publications
    'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper no.161, July 2014

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    SERC website


    Friday 25 July 2014

    Yahoo! Argentina: Plan Terapia para Todos: la salud mental de los economistas y las series policiales de Film and Arts

    ''En los paises ricos, las enfermedades mentales son el 38 percent de todas las enfermedades; y el porcentaje trepa a 50 percent en la poblacion trabajadora'', dice Richard Layard, economista de la London School of Economics, que promueve en Inglaterra algo asi como un plan de Terapia para Todos. Layard cuenta, en un libro escrito junto al psicologo David Clark, que los costos de un programa a gran escala de terapias cognitivo-conductuales cortas - 16 sesiones - ''basadas en evidencia con resultados reales'' son mucho menores a los costos que implican las dolencias emocionales en terminos de dias no trabajados, desmotivacion, etcetera.

    This article was published online by Yahoo! Argentina on July 25, 2014
    Link to article here

    See also
    Yahoo! En Espanol
    Yahoo! Colombia
    La Nacion
    Yahoo! Mexico

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard and David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014
    Details

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    David Clark webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Tuesday 22 July 2014

    Centre for Economic Performance Press Release: The 2014 EIB Prize for Excellence in Economic and Social Research awarded to the economists Nicholas Bloom and John Van Reenen

    The EIB Institute announces that this year's 'Outstanding Contribution Award' - with a prize of EUR 40,000 - will go jointly to Professors Nicholas Bloom (Department of Economics, Stanford University) and John Van Reenen (Centre for Economic Performance and Department of Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science) in acknowledgement of the academic excellence, work published and impact on public policy of their research on this year's prize topic ''Innovation, Market Structure and Competitiveness''.

    The press notice was released by the Centre for Economic Performance on July 22, 2014
    Link to the press release here

    Related links
    Nicholas Bloom webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage

    Friday 18 July 2014

    Ely Standard: Campaigners say thousands will be wiped off of property prices if turbine plans go ahead in Haddenham

    Campaigners fighting against plans to erect three wind turbines in Haddenham say thousands of pounds could be wiped off the value of every home in the village if the scheme goes ahead. The Stop Berry Fen Wind Farm group cite a report published in the spring by Professor Stephen Gibbons, of the London School of Economics, which covered more than a million homes in close proximity to large wind farms over a 12-year period.

    This article was published by the Ely Standard on July 18, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014

    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 16 July 2014

    What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth – blog: If you build it will they come?

    Article by Henry Overman
    Our latest evidence review on the economic impact of cultural and sport projects might make for uncomfortable reading for some local decision makers. We looked at these programmes' effects on wages and employment and found that these tended to be small and more likely zero. How might we reconcile this with reports that tend to suggest large benefits for the local economy?

    This blog post was uploaded to the What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth blog on July 16, 2014
    Link to blog here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage

    Wednesday 16 July 2014

    Financial Times: Target the planning laws not the one per cent

    Only 10 per cent of the value of land in expensive cities is due to its natural scarcity. The rest is planning restrictions. Paul Cheshire and Christian Hilber at the London School of Economics applied the same trick to British and European offices in 2006, with terrifying results.

    This article was published by the Financial Times on July 16, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The cost of regulatory constraints on the British office market, Christian A. L. Hilber and Paul Cheshire. Report for the H.M. Treasury in preparation of ‘Barker Review 2’, (2006) H.M. Treasury, London, UK.
    Office Space Supply Restrictions in Britain: The Political Economy of Market Revenge, Paul Cheshire and Christian A. L. Hilber, The Economic Journal, 118 (June, 2008).

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Christian Hilber webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 16 July 2014

    LSE You Tube video: Thrive: the power of evidence-based psychological therapies

    Film of the July 10 book launch for Thrive: the power of evidence-based psychological therapies. David Clark, Richard Layard in conversation with the BBC's Andrew Marr.

    The video was posted online to the LSE You Tube channel on July 16, 2014
    Link to video here

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard and David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    David Clark webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Monday 14 July 2014

    Conservative Home: It's not a case of whether we develop the green belt, but how we do it

    It’s a question we’ve asked before on the Deep End, but let’s ask it again: if we plan on building a million new homes every five years or so, where do we stick ’em? Paul Cheshire of the Spatial Economics Research Centre, has a pretty clear idea: “Almost every reasonable person must now accept the case that we need to build on some parts of currently designated Greenbelt land.”

    This article was posted online by Conservative Home on July 14, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Friday 11 July 2014

    BBC Radio Bristol: News

    Presenter quotes an earlier appearance by Paul Cheshire on the BBC's 'Sunday Politics Show' discussing the use of the green belt for new housing sites.

    This mention was on the BBC Radio Bristol News on July 11, 2014
    [No link available]

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Wednesday 09 July 2014

    The Telegraph: Does Germany rule your world?

    This article was first published on January 28, 2013 and has been republished after Germany beat Brazil 7-1 in the World Cup semi-final
    Second, it is the view of most economists that Germany has been the biggest winner out the euro, and that being part of the euro - rather than keeping its old currency the Deutschmark - has been an enormous advantage. When it joined, the exchange rate was set at EURO 1 = DM1.96, which most people at the time thought was a fair rate. But it is estimated by the European Commission itself that since then, Germany's real exchange rate has fallen by nearly 20 per cent. In other words, if Germany had kept the Deutschmark, the value of its goods would have been 20 per cent more expensive to any potential customer. Being part of the shared euro, kept weak by struggling neighbours, has helped it drag down the cost of its goods. As a result, German cars, kettles and shoelaces suddenly became far cheaper to buy. This argument has long been pushed by Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, no less, who has emerged one of the chief Germany-bashers. But a number of other Nobel prize-winning economists, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Christopher Pissarides, have recently joined him in voicing criticisms of the inherent problems of a powerful northern Europe, led by Germany, and a weak southern Europe all using the same currency. Germany, they say, urgently has to readdress its serious imbalances. The most obvious method would be to make its goods more expensive, by pushing up its workers' wages.

    This article was published online by The Telegraph on July 9, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage

    Monday 07 July 2014

    Rochdale Online: Report challenges economic benefit argument for major sporting and cultural events

    The impact evaluation and evidence review – Sports and Culture: The Impact of Major Events and Facilities –considered 36 post-event evaluations from across the UK and other OECD nations, and assessed the local economic impacts of staging major events on employment, wages and property prices. While acknowledging the many other intrinsic benefits and motivations behind hosting such events – including health, wellbeing, prestige and cultural enrichment – the review found very limited evidence to justify claims of stimulating local economic growth. “Longer-term economic benefits are an increasingly cited reason for hosting major sporting and cultural events and facilities. And yet, it appears that in many instances, there is no empirical basis for these particular claims,” said Professor Henry Overman, Director of the What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth

    This article appeared in Rochdale Online on 7 July 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Max Nathan webpage
    What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth webpage

    Monday 07 July 2014

    FT.com: Sports events no big score for local economies, study finds

    London’s new Wembley Stadium lifted house prices in the area by 15 per cent, while the announcement of the Olympics coming to London pushed up values within three miles of the stadium by 5 per cent. But there is little evidence of job creation from sports events and facilities, while evidence of an uplift in wages is mixed, says the study by the What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth, a collaboration of the London School of Economics, the Centre for Cities and Arup. Any tourism or trade import benefit is likely to be short-lived, say researchers. They reviewed 36 big sports and culture events and facilities, including two Fifa World Cup tournaments, four Olympic Games, the Super Bowl, the rugby and cricket world cups and regular season basketball and American football games.

    This article appeared in the FT.com on 7 July 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Max Nathan webpage
    What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth webpage

    Sunday 06 July 2014

    The Sunday Express: 'Use green belt to fix housing land shortage'

    The Government's Help to Buy scheme was also helping first time buyers move into the market, she added but Prof. Cheshire rejected the measures as ''putting fingers in dykes''. ''The help to buy scheme is simply a recipe for increasing house prices. It has no other effect because supply is so inelastic,'' he said. ''The crisis in our housing market is absolutely and undeniably about lack of supply. The most important single factor to this is the planning system and the restriction on development for 60 years. There is no alternative but to reconsider greenbelt land. We have to increase supply of housing land and that cannot be done on brownfield sites alone because there is surprisingly few of them and they are not in the right places were the demand for housing is.''

    This article was published in The Sunday Express on July 6, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website


    Sunday 06 July 2014

    The Sunday Express: 'Use green belt to fix housing land shortage'

    The Government's Help to Buy scheme was also helping first time buyers move into the market, she added but Prof. Cheshire rejected the measures as ''putting fingers in dykes''. ''The help to buy scheme is simply a recipe for increasing house prices. It has no other effect because supply is so inelastic,'' he said. ''The crisis in our housing market is absolutely and undeniably about lack of supply. The most important single factor to this is the planning system and the restriction on development for 60 years. There is no alternative but to reconsider greenbelt land. We have to increase supply of housing land and that cannot be done on brownfield sites alone because there is surprisingly few of them and they are not in the right places were the demand for housing is.''

    This article was published in The Sunday Express on July 6, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website


    Friday 04 July 2014

    Hispanic Business.com: United Kingdom: Deputy Prime Minister announces Northern Futures project

    The Northern Futures project is a new approach to policymaking which means that rather than decisions being made by politicians and civil servants in Whitehall, the power is given to the people who live and work there. ... The call for ideas is open to people from all walks of life - businesses, civic leaders, experts in housing, transport and science, academics, students. The following people are already on board: Tom Riordan, Leeds City Council, John Mothersole, Sheffield City Council, Sir Richard Lease and Sir Howard Bernstein, Manchester City Council, Alexandra Jones, Centre for Cities, Hakim Yadi, Northern Health Sciences Alliance, Tom Bloxham MBE, Urban Splash, Henry Overman, London School of Economics, Jim O'Neill, RSA City Growth Commission, Julia Unwin, Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

    This article was published by Hispanicbusiness.com on July 4, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage

    Wednesday 02 July 2014

    Cornish Guardian: Complaint about turbine booklet

    A wind farm developer has agreed to stop distributing a booklet which was given to residents in the parish of St Enoder after a complaint was made to the Advertising Standard Authority (ASA). The complaint to ASA argued whether a claim in the booklet that the impact of turbines on house prices diminishes as time goes on was misleading, and whether it could be substantiated. The claims were made despite the publication of a nationwide study in January by the London School of Economics (LSE), which reviewed more than a million homes located near large wind farms over a 12-year period, and found property values fell by 11 per cent.

    This article was published in the Cornish Guardian on July 2, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014

    Related Links
    Steve Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 01 July 2014

    SERC Book Published: Urban Economics and Urban Policy

    Urban Economics and Urban Policy

    A new book by Paul Cheshire, Max Nathan and Henry Overman

    Endorsements:

    'A tour de force' Michael Storper, LSE

    'Bold, exciting and eminently readable' Ed Glaeser, Harvard

    In many countries across the world, cities are experiencing an economic and social resurgence. But this resurgence hides profoundly uneven development, and spatial disparities have proved resistant to policymakers' attempts to reduce them. Urban Economics and Urban Policy sets out the insights that recent economic research brings to our understanding of cities, and the lessons for urban policymaking. The book helps explain why economic development has emerged so unevenly across space, and why these patterns tend to persist. The authors argue that future urban policies need to take better account of the economic forces that drive unevenness, and that their success should be judged by their impact on people, not places.

    The book draws on the growing global body of literature on spatial economics and economic geography, and in particular the urban research programmes at SERC and LSE. It should prove to be an invaluable resource and a rewarding read for academics, practitioners and policymakers interested in the economics of urban policy, urban planning and development, as well as international studies and innovation.

    To download the first chapter or to order the full book online, please visit the following SERC publications page.



    Monday 30 June 2014

    BBC Parliament: Communities and Local Government Questions

    Barry Sheerman MP mentioned LSE report which highlighted percentage of greenbelt land which could be used for housing.

    The broadcast was made by BBC Parliament on June 30, 2014

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Monday 23 June 2014

    FT.com: 'Crossrail of the North' suggested to boost economic integration

    Henry Overman, a London School of Economics professor who authored the report, has continued to lobby for ''agglomeration'' of big northern cities. Prof Overman said recently that reducing travel time between Leeds and Manchester would boost wages by attracting better quality workers. ''Our largest estimate - for a 20-minute reduction in train journey times between Leeds and Manchester - has average wages increasing by between 1.06 per cent and 2.7 per cent,'' he said. ''The composition of the workforce is different in larger, better-connected places.'' He has argued against the HS2 north-south high-speed rail line, pointing out that the impact of knocking 20 minutes off the Manchester-Leeds journey is estimated to be three times that of a 40-minute reduction for travel from Leeds to London.

    This article was published in the FT.com on June 23, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    The economic future of British cities, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website


    Thursday 19 June 2014

    Daily Mail: Cameron pledges to fight UK's dementia timebomb

    Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said discovering a treatment to delay the onset of dementia by just 36 months would save the country as much as £5billion a year. Mr Cameron will claim there is a 'market failure', with scientists and drug companies having no incentive to prioritise dementia research.

    This article was published in the Daily Mail on June 19, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Thursday 19 June 2014

    Financial Times: Sacrifice the greenbelt to fix the broken property market

    As Prof Paul Cheshire points out in London School of Economics journal Centrepiece, more of the county of Surrey is devoted to golf courses than houses. Just 10 per cent of England is built up, and gardens cover nearly half of that area. Meanwhile a child in inner London derives no benefit from the existence of greenbelt land several miles away.

    This article was published in the Financial Times on June 19, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece - Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of the British Planning, Paul Cheshire, LSE British Politics and Policy Blog, posted May 7, 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 17 June 2014

    Bloomberg BusinessWeek: Crest Nicholson CEO says housing policy 'tinkering'

    Stephen Stone, chief executive officer of Crest Nicholson Holdings Plc and Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at London School of Economics, discuss U.K. property prices, planning laws and building on green-belt land. They speak with Anna Edwards and Mark Barton on Bloomberg Television's ''Countdown''.

    This article was published by Bloomberg BusinessWeek on June 17, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website


    Monday 16 June 2014

    Guardian online - Dave Hill's London Blog: Boris Johnson: brown fields and green elephants

    According to Professor Paul Cheshire, you could build 1.6 million homes at average densities if just a fraction of that greenbelt space, much of it riding schools and golf courses, were reclassified.

    This article was published in the guardian.co.uk Dave Hill's London Blog on June 16, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website


    Friday 13 June 2014

    TransportXtra: Transport debate 'damaged by dubious job creation claims'

    In a keynote paper to last week's Modelling World conference, Henry Overman said much greater discipline needed to be imposed on the claims made by policy-makers about transport investment's impact on the economy.

    This article was published online by TransportXtra on June 13, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Henry Overman CEP Publications webpage

    Wednesday 11 June 2014

    Grupo Aseguranza: Los expertos ven en el copago una oportunidad para desarrollar el seguro de Salud (Experts see an opportunity to develop health insurance)

    Joan Costa Font, del London School of Economics, ha asegurado en el I Congreso de Seguros Personales para el Ahorro y la Salud organizado por ICEA, que “en Espana, donde haya copago habra posibilidad de ofrecer un seguro sanitario que lo cubra”.

    This article was published by Grupo Aseguranza on June 11, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Joan Costa Font webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    Wednesday 11 June 2014

    BBC Radio 4: Housing: Where will we all live?

    A debate on why Britain is failing to build enough homes and how best to fix the problem which was held at LSE. Speakers included Paul Cheshire.

    This programme was first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on June 11, 2014
    Link to broadcast here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Friday 06 June 2014

    BBC Radio 4: World at One

    Paul Cheshire talks about the housing crisis.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4 on the World at One show on June 6, 2014
    Link to programme here

    Also on:
    Heart Northampton
    BBC Radio 2
    BBC Cornwall
    BBC Leicester
    BBC Manchester
    BBC Merseyside
    BBC Cambridgeshire
    Downtown Radio Belfast
    BBC London 94.9
    BBC Wales
    BBC Radio 5 Live
    BBC Radio Scotland

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 04 June 2014

    City AM: Britain's housing crisis will morph into catastrophe if politicians don't change, by Paul Cheshire

    THE HOUSING crisis – worst in London, but bad across Britain – is fundamentally driven by lack of supply. For the past five years, we have been building fewer houses than in any peacetime period since before World War One. But house building has been on a downwards trend since the 1960s. Reasonable estimates suggest the shortfall in England has been 1.6m to 2.3m houses between 1994 and 2012. Moreover, too many of those we have built have not been in locations where demand is highest. We persistently build houses where they are relatively most affordable and job prospects are relatively worst.

    This article appeared in City AM on 4 June 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece - Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Friday 30 May 2014

    Huffington Post Politics (UK): Are immigrants really undermining the wages of low-paid Britons?

    A London School of Economics study in 2009 concluded that ''migrants have a significant, small, negative impact on average wages'', adding that it tended to have the biggest impact on the semi/unskilled services sector.

    This article was printed online by Huffington Post Politics (UK) on May 30, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'The Impact of Immigration on Occupational Wages: Evidence from Britain', Stephen Nickell and Jumana Saleheen, SERC Discussion Paper No.34, October 2009

    Related links
    Stephen Nickell CEP publications webpage
    SERC (Spatial Economics Research Centre) website

    Wednesday 28 May 2014

    Local Government Chronicle: Commission on country growth calls for evidence

    LGA names members of panel that will assess role of non-metropolitan areas. The independent commission will be chaired by Sir John Peace, chair of Nottinghamshire's local growth board and of Standard Chartered PLC and Burberry. Other commissioners will include Lady Cobham, chair of VisitEngland, Sir Tony Hawkhead, chief executive of Action for Children and Professor Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics. The commission has launched a public call for evidence and wants to hear from business leaders, voluntary and faith groups and public service leaders.

    This article was published by the Local Government Chronicle on May 28, 2014
    A pdf copy of the article can be downloaded from here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Wednesday 21 May 2014

    City A.M.: The UK housing market needs Help to Supply - not Help to Buy

    THE UK housing market needs Help to Supply, not Help to Buy. The government's housing scheme has helped first-time buyers get a leg-up onto the property ladder, but that privilege has come at a price - with house prices higher than otherwise, as the subsidy became capitalised in prices. Paul Cheshire, emeritus professor at the LSE, has shown how building on greenbelt would only have to be very modest in order to provide more than enough land for housing for generations to come.

    This article was published in City A.M. on May 21, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) webpage

    Wednesday 21 May 2014

    The Guardian: Six reasons why we should build on the green belt

    The fourth reason given for building on the green belt:

    It encourages inequality
    The green belt increases social inequality by acting as a wall that confines urban dwellers at increasingly higher densities. Prof Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics described it as ''a very British form of discriminatory zoning, keeping the urban unwashed out of the home counties - and, of course, helping to turn houses into investment assets instead of places to live''.

    This article was published in The Guardian on May 21, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) webpage

    Thursday 15 May 2014

    Cyprus Mail: Initiative looks at how to overcome cuts in education

    THE Cyprus Volunteer Team of Supporters of the European Citizens' Initiative ''Invest in Education'' is organising an open event tomorrow regarding a campaign to put an end to cuts in education due to austerity measures. Sir Christopher Pissarides, the Cypriot Nobel Prize Winner for Economics, will be delivering the key-note speech. He is one of the supporters of the initiative.

    This article was published by Cyprus Mail on May 15, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage


    Thursday 15 May 2014

    SERC Blog: Building Reliant Robin Houses adds to our Housing Crisis, by Paul Cheshire

    We all know there is a housing crisis. The latest data show that on the best measure of affordability (the price of a house mid-way in the price range relative to earnings mid-way in the range), the national position is half 1997 levels and not a lot better than at the worst point in 2007. The debate about causes is full of myths, many self-serving - such as the claim that we are in danger of concreting over England. As I showed in a recent article, the reality is that Greenbelts cover more than 1.5 times all our built- up areas put together. Surrey has more land for golf courses (2.65%) than for actual houses (2.06%).

    This article appeared on the SERC Blog on 15 May 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 14 May 2014

    BBC Berkshire: News

    Paul Cheshire discusses need for more housing on greenbelts.

    This interview was broadcast by BBC Berkshire on May 14, 2014
    No link available.

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website


    Wednesday 14 May 2014

    The Economist: Why London's house prices are soaring

    As professor Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics points out, in the five years to 2013 twice as many houses were built in Doncaster and Barnsley - two struggling northern towns - than in Oxford and Cambridge, which are thriving.

    This article was published by The Economist on May 14, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    Tuesday 13 May 2014

    Gaston Gazette: 7 keys to happiness that money can't buy

    Since 1956, the average American's disposable income (in today's dollars) has tripled from $9,431 to $27,792, according to data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis. However, as reported in the book, Happiness, by Richard Layard, people's level of happiness hasn't increased at all during that time.

    This article was published online by the Gaston Gazette on May 13, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science (2nd Edition) Richard Layard, Penguin (April 2011)
    Details

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programmewebpage

    Tuesday 13 May 2014

    Guardian.co.uk: London housing crisis: who dares to brown the greenbelt?

    I liked Paul Cheshire's diagnosis of Britain's housing affordability crisis from the off: When things go wrong it is always handy to blame foreigners and currently even the liberal press are blaming them for our crisis of housing affordability. Aren't we just, especially where London is concerned? That, and complaining about the skyline while all over the city kids are sleeping on sofas because there aren't enough bedrooms in their homes.

    This article appeared in The Guardian on 13 May 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning , Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 13 May 2014

    The Daily Telegraph: Enough is enough, we need higher interest rates now

    In the 1970s and 80s, some 4.3m new homes were built in Britain. In the subsequent two decades, the numbers plummeted to 2.7m. To stabilise affordability in the areas of the country people have to live and work — twice as many houses were built in Doncaster and Barnsley, where prices have been falling steeply, in the five years to 2013 than in Oxford and Cambridge, where prices are rising strongly — requires return to previous levels of house building. As an economy, we’ve not been building enough housing for 30 years or more. I take these statistics from an article by Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, in the LSE’s CentrePiece magazine.

    This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 13 May 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 13 May 2014

    The Daily Telegraph: Enough is enough, we need higher interest rates now

    In the 1970s and 80s, some 4.3m new homes were built in Britain. In the subsequent two decades, the numbers plummeted to 2.7m. To stabilise affordability in the areas of the country people have to live and work — twice as many houses were built in Doncaster and Barnsley, where prices have been falling steeply, in the five years to 2013 than in Oxford and Cambridge, where prices are rising strongly — requires return to previous levels of house building. As an economy, we’ve not been building enough housing for 30 years or more. I take these statistics from an article by Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, in the LSE’s CentrePiece magazine.

    This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 13 May 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Monday 12 May 2014

    The Guardian: Why house prices are so expensive in the UK, article by Paul Cheshire

    We all know there is a housing crisis. The latest data shows that, on the best measure of affordability, a typical house is half as affordable as it was in 1997 and not a lot more affordable than at the worst point in 2007. The debate about causes is full of myths, some of them extremely self-serving, such as the claim that we are in danger of concreting over England. As I showed in a recent article, the reality is that the green belt covers more land than all our built-up areas put together, and golf courses take up more land in Surrey (2.65%) than houses do (2.06%).

    This article appeared in the Guardian on 12 May 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    "Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning" Paul Cheshire. Article from forthcoming CentrePiece - Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Sunday 11 May 2014

    Guardian.co.uk: UK property market - what will the Bank of England do next?

    In the long run, the answer to Britain's out-of-kilter housing market is an increase in the supply of homes. Paul Cheshire, an academic at the London School of Economics, says there has been a slowdown in the number of new homes built: from 4.3m in the two decades covering the 1970s and 1980s to 2.7m.

    This article was published online by guardian.co.uk on May 11, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website


    Sunday 11 May 2014

    The Sunday Times Online: Economic Outlook: House price hysteria is not justified — for now

    Nipping it in the bud too soon, despite justifiable concerns about house prices in some areas, could backfire. Professor Paul Cheshire, in a spirited piece for the London School of Economics' CentrePiece magazine, estimates that from 1994 to 2012 between 1.6m and 2.3m fewer houses were built than were needed.

    This article was published in The Sunday Times on May 11, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Tuesday 06 May 2014

    New Statesman: Why the costly, pointless war on drugs must come to an end

    The London School of Economics has attempted to begin counting the costs of the war on drugs in a new report, Ending the Drug Wars: Report of the LSE Expert Group on the Economics of Drug Policy…….Signatories also include the LSE’s most recent Nobel Laureate Professor Sir Christopher Pissarides.

    This articles appeared in the New Statesmen on 6 May 2014 link to article

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage

    Friday 02 May 2014

    Planning resource: Housing affordability crisis blamed on green belt policy

    Green belt polices that aim to keep ''the urban unwashed out of the Home Counties'' are causing a housing affordability crisis, according to a London School of Economics (LSE) professor. Britain's booming house prices have been caused by ''decades of planning policies that constrain the supply of houses and land'', according to a study by Paul Cheshire, professor emeritus of economic geography at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance.

    This article was published by Planningresource online on May 2, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Thursday 01 May 2014

    tutor2u.net: UK Housing Industry: Turning Houses into Gold!

    Britain's crisis of housing affordability is nothing to do with foreign speculators, according to Paul Cheshire writing in the Spring 2014 issue of CentrePiece magazine. Rather, it is a result of decades of misguided planning policies that constrain the supply of land and turn houses into something like gold or artworks. Houses have been converted from places in which to live into people's most important financial asset.

    This article was posted online by tutor2u.net on May 1, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article from forthcoming CentrePiece - Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Monday 28 April 2014

    Inside Housing.co.uk: More of Surrey devoted to golf than housing

    More of Surrey is now devoted to golf courses than housing, new research branding the green belt 'discriminatory zoning' has found.

    This article was published by Inside Housing.co.uk on April 28, 2014
    Link to article here. [Subscription needed to access complete article.]

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website


    Monday 28 April 2014

    Inside Housing.co.uk: More of Surrey devoted to golf than housing

    More of Surrey is now devoted to golf courses than housing, new research branding the green belt 'discriminatory zoning' has found.

    This article was published by Inside Housing.co.uk on April 28, 2014
    Link to article here. [Subscription needed to access complete article.]

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website


    Sunday 27 April 2014

    Macleans.ca: Italy's stay-at-home kids

    48 per cent of European adults between 18 and 30 now live with their parents, an increase from 44 per cent at the onset of the economic crisis in 2007. But the highest number is in Italy, with 79 per cent. That's up from about 60 per cent a few years ago, according to a separate report. ... In a 2005 paper written for the Centre for Economic Policy Research [sic] in the UK, economists Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti wrote that while high youth unemployment (now at 42 per cent) plays a role in these living arrangements, the main factor is that Italian parents want their children to live with them. The parents essentially bribe their children to stay home by feeding them, doing their laundry and giving them money in exchange for care and companionship.

    This article was published online by Macleans.ca (Canada) on April 27, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure. Why Do Most Italian Youths Live With Their Parents?, Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.536, June 2002
    Mamma's boys? Why most young Italian men live with their parents, Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti. Article in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 3, Winter 2005
    Why Do Most Italian Youths Live with their Parents? Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure, Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti, Journal of the European Economic Association, 4: 800-829, June 2006

    Related links
    Marco Manacorda webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage


    Sunday 27 April 2014

    Daily Mail: Golf takes more land in Surrey than houses

    More land in Surrey is dedicated to playing golf rather than housing, new research has shown. Prof Paul Cheshire, researcher at the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the LSE said green belts were driving up the price of houses and subsidising activities such as golf Prof Cheshire said in London alone there was enough green belt land to build an estimated 1.6 million new homes with average densities. He said the land bank was about 32,500 hectares and could have an impact on the cost of homes in the region.

    This article appeared in the Daily Mail on 27 April 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Turning Houses Into Gold: The Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire April 2014, in CentrePiece, volume 19 issue 1

    Related Links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC webpage

    Sunday 27 April 2014

    The Observer: Why Surrey has more land for golf courses than for homes

    A study by the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE suggests soaring house prices are not caused by an influx of foreign buyers but are down to restrictive planning policies that have ensured the country's green belt is a form of "discriminatory zoning, keeping the urban unwashed out of the home counties". Paul Cheshire, professor emeritus of economic geography at LSE and a researcher at the Spatial Economics Research Centre, has produced data showing that restrictive planning laws have turned houses in the south-east into valuable assets in an almost equivalent way to artworks. He points out that twice as many houses were built in Doncaster and Barnsley in the five years to 2013 than in Oxford and Cambridge

    This article appeared in the Observer on 27 April 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Turning Houses Into Gold: The Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire April 2014, in CentrePiece, volume 19 issue 1

    Related Links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC webpage

    Wednesday 23 April 2014

    Western Daily Press: Wind farms 'slashing house prices by half' in Devon

    ''Recently there have been reports published by the LSE (London School of Economics) concluding that house values within close proximity of a wind farm are reduced by up to 11 per cent - however, here on the ground in Devon when houses are near a single wind turbine, estate agents are recommending huge discounts of between 40 and 50 per cent in some cases - if they're saleable at all,'' said Mrs Mills.

    This article was published in the Western Daily Press on April 23, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014 Related Links
    Steve Gibbons webpage
    SERC website


    Thursday 10 April 2014

    Quartz: One way to stop surging British house prices - build more wind farms

    A new research paper highlights one way to keep property prices in check - put up some wind turbines in the neighborhood. Stephen Gibbons of the London School of Economics (LSE) looked at property sales since 2000 and found that house prices within 8 kilometers (5 miles) of visible wind farms were lower than those nearby but out of sight of the turbines. Average prices were up to 6 percent lower in areas with a visible wind farm within 2 kilometers, and the effect gets worse the more turbines dot the horizon - prices were 12 percent lower if 20 or more turbines were visible within that range.

    This article was published online by Quartz on April 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines Through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014


    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 08 April 2014

    guardian.co.uk: Windfarms can reduce house prices by up to 12%, says LSE

    Large windfarms can knock as much as 12 percent off the values of homes within a 2km radius, and reduce property prices as far as 14km away, according to research by the London School of Economics. The findings contrast sharply with a report by the Centre for Economics and Business Research in March, which found no negative impact on property prices within a 5km radius of a turbine.

    This article was published online by guardian.co.uk on April 8, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014 Related Links
    Steve Gibbons webpage
    SERC website


    Thursday 03 April 2014

    BBC News - Business: Move over, GDP: How should you measure a country's value?

    There have been several other attempts at complementing or replacing GDP. Sir Gus O'Donnell explains the impact wellbeing research is having on policy. The UN implemented the human development index, the OECD has a ''better life index'' and even the UK's own Office for National Statistics measures national wellbeing. Recently, Sir Gus O'Donnell, a former senior civil servant in the UK, published a wellbeing and policy report, which investigated the main economic, social and personal drivers of happiness. ... But there are those who resist the idea that GDP cannot map welfare. Nick Oulton, of the London School of Economics, argues that economic growth can be a good measure of a country's wellbeing. ''It won't solve all problems, but a rise in wealth can lead to declines in infant mortality, increased life expectancy, and people getting healthier because they can afford to eat more food,'' he says.

    This article was published online by BBC News - Business on April 3, 2014
    Link to article here

    Also in
    UK Wired News

    Related publications
    'Wellbeing and Policy', Gus O'Donnell, Angus Deaton, Martine Durand, David Halpern and Richard Layard, Legatum Institute Report, March 2014
    Link to report here
    Nicholas Oulton's CEP publications

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Nicholas Oulton webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Thursday 03 April 2014

    The Independent: House prices, waste incinerator plants and wind farms

    Preliminary findings from a report due out later this year from the LSE indicates there is a drop of up to 15 per cent in house value due to nearby wind farms.

    This article was published by The Independent on April 3, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices', Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014

    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 01 April 2014

    BusinessGreen.com: Reports: Lib Dems block Conservative onshore wind farm veto

    A new report commissioned by RenewableUK found wind farms have no negative impacts on house prices within a five kilometre radius and can even push up property prices in some parts of the country. The industry report pre-empts the release of a study by Professor Stephen Gibbons at the London School of Economics, which is expected to argue that operational wind farms can reduce house prices by around seven per cent if they are located up to 5km from the wind farm site.

    This article was published online by BusinessGreen.com on April 1, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the wind: valuing the local effects of wind turbines through house prices' by Stephen Gibbons. Draft report link

    Related Links
    Steve Gibbons webpage
    SERC website


    Monday 31 March 2014

    BBC Radio Norfolk: News

    Research by Professor Steve Gibbons cited in a discussion of a new report commissioned by Renewable UK which has concluded that having a wind farm nearby does not affect the value of a house - which contradicts the findings of the report from LSE.

    The interview was broadcast on BBC Radio Norfolk News on March 31, 2014
    No link available.

    Related publications
    'Gone with the wind: valuing the local effects of wind turbines through house prices' by Stephen Gibbons. Draft report link

    Related Links
    Steve Gibbons webpage
    SERC website


    Saturday 29 March 2014

    The Guardian: Property prices unaffected by windfarms, says CEBR

    The CEBR findings contradict separate research by the London School of Economics, which found that if a windfarm is visible from a house, on average it knocks 5-6% off its sale price, and as much as 15%. It suggested that a typical windfarm of 11 turbines would face a bill of £12m to compensate houses within 4km.

    This article was published by the Guardian on March 29, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Gone with the wind: valuing the local effects of wind turbines through house prices' by Stephen Gibbons. Draft report link.

    Related Links
    Steve Gibbons webpage
    SERC website

    Thursday 27 March 2014

    Regeneration and Renewal blog: Apres le SEP, le deluge?

    We probably learnt relatively little new from the LEP Network Annual Conference 2014, held in London this week, but perhaps we saw something(s) quite profound. The conference restated many of the major priorities for next steps in enhancing local leadership of economic growth in England. Similarly, it raised a number of fundamental issues LEPs need to address if they are to become credible principal institutions in this process. Most presentations - including Vince Cable's - were able to highlight a number of individual initiatives they think are innovative and interesting. Whether these will deliver long term sustainable positive economic impact is less clear in these early days. Henry Overman's presentation on the 'What works centre...' encouraged use of, and engagement with, evaluation evidence - with the first of their 'evidence reviews' due for publication next week.

    This article was posted on the Regeneration and Renewal blog on March 27, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage
    What Works Centre for Local Economic Growthwebsite

    Friday 21 March 2014

    The Times: Volunteers 'will live for longer'

    Lord O'Donnell said that not volunteering to care for the very old or very young was equivalent to starting a 15-cigarette a day habit on the day they retire. His new report for the Legatum Institute recommends that the Government stop measuring success in terms of GDP and focuses more on the happiness and wellbeing of its people. It included the key recommendation that more must be done to keep pensioners active and connected with the community. Lord O'Donnell told The Daily Telegraph: "Loneliness is the basic equivalent of smoking 15 cigarettes a day in terms of what it will do for your life expectancy. The ageing population is very expensive. Some people are basically very lonely and, if they are lonely, their health deteriorates and they end up spending more time in hospital."

    This article appeared in the Times on 21 March 2014 link to article

    Related Publication
    Wellbeing and Policy Gus O'Donnell, Angus Deaton, Martine Durand, David Halpern and Richard Layard, March 2014 link to report

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Gus O'Donnell webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    Thursday 20 March 2014

    The Economist: Internal migration: Not on your bike

    Britons are moving around less than they used to
    Alan Manning, an academic at the London School of Economics, suggests low migration makes struggling towns more vulnerable to economic shocks: if they cannot move to work, people who lose their jobs will take much longer to find new ones.

    This article was published by the Economist on March 20, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Alan Manning's CEP Publications webpage

    Related Links
    Alan Manning webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    Community Programme webpage

    Monday 17 March 2014

    Henry Overman Blog: How Unbalanced is Infrastructure Spending?

    Any one reading these reports (especially the first two) would conclude that these figures tell us how existing public expenditure on transport is hugely skewed towards London. This is simply not the case. The best figures we have for the regional distribution of existing public expenditure on transport come from the PESA tables that I quoted above. To repeat, these show "in 2010-11 London received £800 per head (compared to an English average - including London - of around £400). But the second ranked region was the North West with £337 per head.

    This article appeared on Henry Overman's Blog on 17 March 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    The economic future of British cities Henry Overman, June 2013, Paper No' CEPCP389 in CentrePiece Volume 18, issue 1

    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC webpage

    Friday 14 March 2014

    Voice of Russia: London's new high-rise homes: ''We haven't seen anything like this before''

    London's skyline is set for one of its most radical changes ever, with at least 237 tall buildings set to be constructed in the next few decades, says a report for an architecture think-tank, New London Architecture. NLA says approval has already been given for almost half the new blocks most of which will be for residential use, not office space, meaning major changes to the geography of the entire city. But perhaps the most surprising thing about the new developments is that unlike previous ones, Canary Wharf for example, 80 percent of the new blocks will be residential. That's because there's been a surge in demand for housing; prices in the city are now rising by almost 11 percent a year. Professor Christine Whitehead, a housing expert at the London School of Economics says that's because successive governments failed to foresee the success of the capital as a global hub - and didn't build enough housing elsewhere in the South-East: ''We were taken by surprise but it's inherent in a city of London's type and size that unless we can build vastly in the suburbs or the areas outside London, we're going to have a massive housing problem.''

    This article was published online by Voice of Russia on March 14, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Christine Whitehead webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre - SERC - website

    Wednesday 12 March 2014

    City AM: Letters to the Editor

    Joe Valentine makes some nice noises about why mayoral targets and limited planning reform will do little to ease the housing crisis. But she doesn't go far enough. She quotes Paul Cheshire of the LSE, and his calculation that taking a 1km ring of greenbelt land inside the M25 would yield enough land for a generation of house building in London. But Valentine fails to note that Cheshire thinks the greenbelt should disappear entirely – it’s socially exclusive, has little environmental rationale, and benefits the very affluent. It should go altogether

    This article appeared in City AM on 12 March 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC webpage

    Tuesday 11 March 2014

    Blackmore Vale Magazine: Anti-wind turbine campaigner calls meeting at Winterborne Whitechurch

    in property values, which have been estimated in a study by the London School of Economics as an average of 11 per cent for homes within 1.2 miles of a giant turbine.

    This article appeared in Blackmore Vale Magazine on 11 March 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Draft report link
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Monday 10 March 2014

    UK Wired News: The case for making Hebden Bridge the UK's second city

    Britain has a great world city but lacks a great national one. As the eminent economic geographer from the London School of Economics, Henry Overman, puts it: ''These kind of arguments imply that the problem with Britain's urban system is not that London is too big. Instead, if anything, it's that our cities are too small.''

    This article was published online by UK Wired News on March 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The economic future of British cities, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Monday 10 March 2014

    BBC News Online: The case for making Hebden Bridge the UK's second city by Evan Davis

    As the eminent economic geographer from the London School of Economics, Henry Overman, puts it: "These kind of arguments imply that the problem with Britain's urban system is not that London is too big. Instead, if anything, it's that our cities are too small."

    This article appeared on BBC News Online on 10 March 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    The economic future of British cities Henry Overman, June 2013, Paper No' CEPCP389 in CentrePiece Volume 18, issue 1

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC webpage webpage

    Sunday 09 March 2014

    Reuters: Bank of England's Carney faces grilling over foreign exchange scandal

    John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, said a natural extension of Carney's push to improve transparency at the Bank would be to bring more clarity to its internal supervision.

    This article appeared on Reuters on 9 March 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage

    Also in:
    MSN Money link
    Business RSS News link

    Friday 07 March 2014

    La Repubblica: Emerging world poses more danger than in 1990s: Cutting research

    Breakthroughs in information and technology have increased demand and pay for highly skilled and university-educated workers, outpacing the need for employees with middle-range skills, according to the London School of Economics. Technical change accounted for 15 percent to 25 percent of the growth in the aggregate wage bill of highly skilled workers, the study by Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen found. The results were based on employment and wages in 11 countries during the past 25 years. The pay of low-skilled workers was less influenced by developments in technology, it said.

    This article was published by La Repubblica on March 7, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Has ICT Polarized Skill Demand? Evidence from Eleven Countries over Twenty-Five Years, Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen. Article in The Review of Economics and Statistics Volume 96, Issue 1, March 2014
    The shrinking middle, Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
    'Has ICT Polarized Skill Demand? Evidence from Eleven Countries over 25 Years', Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.987, June 2010

    Related links
    Guy Michaels webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Friday 07 March 2014

    La Repubblica: Emerging world poses more danger than in 1990s: Cutting research

    Breakthroughs in information and technology have increased demand and pay for highly skilled and university-educated workers, outpacing the need for employees with middle-range skills, according to the London School of Economics. Technical change accounted for 15 percent to 25 percent of the growth in the aggregate wage bill of highly skilled workers, the study by Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen found. The results were based on employment and wages in 11 countries during the past 25 years. The pay of low-skilled workers was less influenced by developments in technology, it said.

    This article was published by La Repubblica on March 7, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Has ICT Polarized Skill Demand? Evidence from Eleven Countries over Twenty-Five Years, Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen. Article in The Review of Economics and Statistics Volume 96, Issue 1, March 2014
    The shrinking middle, Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
    'Has ICT Polarized Skill Demand? Evidence from Eleven Countries over 25 Years', Guy Michaels, Ashwini Natraj and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.987, June 2010

    Related links
    Guy Michaels webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Thursday 06 March 2014

    LSE British Politics and Policy blog: Towns and cities can be trapped in wrong locations

    When thinking about policy responses, it is worth looking at the past to see how historical events can leave cities trapped in locations that are far from ideal. We have done that in a study that compares the evolution of two initially similar urban networks following a historical calamity that wiped out one, while leaving the other largely intact.

    This LSE British Politics and Policy blog was posted online on March 6, 2014
    Link to blog article here

    Related publications
    Can cities be trapped in bad locations?, Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch. Artice in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 3, Winter 2013/14
    'Resetting the Urban Network 117-2012', Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1248, November 2013
    Can history leave towns struck in places with bad locational fundamentals?, Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch, Vox, 08/12/2013

    Related links
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Ferdinand Rauch webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Monday 03 March 2014

    Radio Times: Evan Davis: We love big cities because we long to be near other people

    Henry Overman is a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics. He argues that the UK is an unusual country, not so much in the large size of its capital, but in the small size of its second-tier cities.

    This article appeared in the Radio Times on 3 March 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    The economic future of British cities Henry Overman, June 2013, Paper No' CEPCP389 in CentrePiece Volume 18, issue 1

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC webpage

    Monday 03 March 2014

    SERC: Spatial Economics Research Centre blog: Mind the gap

    Henry Overman writes:
    On the Today programme this morning talking cities with Ed Cox (IPPR North) and Evan Davis - whose two part series Mind the Gap London vs the Rest is playing on BBC 2.
    The starting point - on which we all agreed - is that the geographic concentration of economic activity in London and the South East offers fantastic opportunities in terms of both work and play (as a result of 'agglomeration economies' arising from the benefits of physical proximity). The points of disagreement relate to the extent to which this is sustainable and whether it would be possible to generate similar opportunities elsewhere.

    The SERC blog was published online on March 3, 2014
    Link to blog page here

    Related publications
    The economic future of British cities, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website

    Monday 03 March 2014

    BBC Radio 4: Today programme

    8:35am Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, and Ed Cox, director of the Institute for Public Policy Research North, debate why London is such a powerful force in the UK.

    The debate was aired on BBC Radio 4's Today Programme on March 3, 2014
    Link to programme here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Monday 24 February 2014

    BBC2: Horizon TV: How you make decisions

    Professor Paul Dolan featured in Episode 9 of the BBC2 programme - Horizon. The episode was looking at how people really make decisions.
    Every day you make thousands of decisions, big and small, and behind all them is a powerful battle in your mind, pitting intuition against logic. This conflict affects every aspect of your life - from what you eat to what you believe, and especially to how you spend your money. And it turns out that the intuitive part of your mind is a lot more powerful than you may realise.

    The BBC2 Horizon episode was broadcast on February 24, 2014
    Link to BBC iplayer here

    Related links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage

    Monday 24 February 2014

    BBC2: Horizon TV: How you make decisions

    Professor Paul Dolan featured in Episode 9 of the BBC2 programme - Horizon. The episode was looking at how people really make decisions.
    Every day you make thousands of decisions, big and small, and behind all them is a powerful battle in your mind, pitting intuition against logic. This conflict affects every aspect of your life - from what you eat to what you believe, and especially to how you spend your money. And it turns out that the intuitive part of your mind is a lot more powerful than you may realise.

    The BBC2 Horizon episode was broadcast on February 24, 2014
    Link to BBC iplayer here

    Related links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage

    Friday 14 February 2014

    New Republic.com: The Silicon Valley labor scandals prove minimum wage hikes don't cost jobs

    The labor economist Alan Manning, in his book Monopsony in Motion (first chapter), argues that these two elements together means that employers have a small amount of market power over each job out there. This power is like a monopoly power, but the power doesn't come from the size or concentration of the firm but instead from the difficulties of the search.

    This article was published online by New Republic.com on February 14, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    'The Real Thin Theory: Monopsony in Modern Labour Markets', Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.564, May 2003
    Monopsony in Motion: Imperfect Competition in Labor Markets, Alan Manning. Published by Princeton University Press, 2005. Details

    Related Links
    Alan Manning webpage
    Labour Markets webpage

    Wednesday 12 February 2014

    Reuters UK - blog: What we know about income inequality: America's disappearing ‘middle-skill' jobs and falling wages

    America is losing middle class jobs - and middle class pay. Not only are ''middle-skill'' jobs disappearing as routine tasks become computerized (think everything people do in the television show ''The Office''), but that job loss has contributed to stagnating wages, according to a recent paper by Michael Boehm of the University of Bonn.

    This article was published online by Reuters US on February 12, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Has job polarisation squeezed the American middle class?, Michael Boehm. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2014
    'Has job polarisation squeezed the middle class? Evidence from the Allocation of Talents', Michael Boehm, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1215, May 2013

    Related links
    Michael Boehm webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Tuesday 11 February 2014

    Capital Romania: Zona Bucuresti-Ilfov, mai prospera decat trei sferturi din regiunile UE

    Trebuie spus ca statisticile privind PIB-ul pe cap de locuitor nu tin seama de un fenomen foarte raspandit in jurul marilor orase din Vest si destul de comun si in zona adiacenta Bucurestiului – navetismul. La produsul intern brut din Londra, Luxemburg, Praga sau Bucuresti-Ilfov contribuie zeci, daca nu sute de mii de persoane care lucreaza acolo, dar locuiesc in alte regiuni adiacente. Conform unui studiu realizat de Paul Chesire, de la London School of Economics, si Stefano Magrini, de la Universitatea din Venetia, ''PIB per capita este unul din indicatorii cu cele mai mari sanse de a fi distorsionat, avand in vedere ca PIB-ul este estimat la locul de munc, iar oamenii sunt numarati acolo unde locuiesc. Din cauza navetismului dincolo de limitele administrative, rezulta ca PIB per capita este sistematic supraestimat in marile orase care sunt si regiuni statistice''.

    It must be said that the statistics on GDP per capita does not take into account a widespread phenomenon around major cities in the West and quite common and in the adjacent area of Bucharest-commuting within. The gross domestic product in London, Luxembourg, Prague or Bucharest-Ilfov contributes dozens if not hundreds of thousands of people who work there, but live in adjacent regions. According to a study by Paul Cheshire, from London School of Economics, and Stefano Magrini, of the University of Venice, ''per capita GDP is one of the indicators with the greatest chance of being distorted, given that GDP is estimated at work, and people are counted where they are staying. Because of the commuting process beyond administrative boundaries, shows that the per capita GDP is systematically overestimated in big cities which are statistical regions''.

    The article was published by Capital Romania on February 11, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Urban Growth Drivers in a Europe of Sticky People and Implicit Boundaries', Paul Cheshire and Stefano Magrini, Spatial Economics Research Centre Discussion Paper No.10, November 2008

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Tuesday 11 February 2014

    SpitsNieuws: Gewonnen geld maakt rechtser

    "Het ziet ernaar uit dat geld een rechts-conservatief gedachtegoed bevordert." Bij mannen is dit effect overigens sterker dan bij vrouwen.
    “It seems that money promotes a right-wing conservative ideology.” In men, this effect is stronger than in women

    This article appeared in SpitsNieuws on 11 February 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    Monday 10 February 2014

    The Conversation: Why the government shouldn't privatise the student loan book

    The announcement that the government intends to sell off part of the student loan book is perhaps no surprise, but it is bad economics. Debt from student loans is currently a groaning £46.6 billion on the government's balance sheet. The government has already made very clear its intent to further privatise the UK's higher education system. The argument is simple. They want to convert an extended stream of income from student loan repayments - which are paid by graduates at a small proportion of their income each month, thus drip-feeding repayment to the government for up to 30 years into the future - into a one-time payment now. This would immediately lower the public debt number. It is a simple move of income in the future to income today. But the truth is that selling the student loans book in this fashion is bad for students, bad for taxpayers, and may even undermine the entire ethos of the higher education finance system.

    This article was published by The Conversation on February 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Gill Wyness webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Monday 10 February 2014

    The Conversation: Why the government shouldn't privatise the student loan book

    The announcement that the government intends to sell off part of the student loan book is perhaps no surprise, but it is bad economics. Debt from student loans is currently a groaning £46.6 billion on the government's balance sheet. The government has already made very clear its intent to further privatise the UK's higher education system. The argument is simple. They want to convert an extended stream of income from student loan repayments - which are paid by graduates at a small proportion of their income each month, thus drip-feeding repayment to the government for up to 30 years into the future - into a one-time payment now. This would immediately lower the public debt number. It is a simple move of income in the future to income today. But the truth is that selling the student loans book in this fashion is bad for students, bad for taxpayers, and may even undermine the entire ethos of the higher education finance system.

    This article was published by The Conversation on February 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Gill Wyness webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Monday 10 February 2014

    The Conversation: Why the government shouldn't privatise the student loan book

    The announcement that the government intends to sell off part of the student loan book is perhaps no surprise, but it is bad economics. Debt from student loans is currently a groaning £46.6 billion on the government's balance sheet. The government has already made very clear its intent to further privatise the UK's higher education system. The argument is simple. They want to convert an extended stream of income from student loan repayments - which are paid by graduates at a small proportion of their income each month, thus drip-feeding repayment to the government for up to 30 years into the future - into a one-time payment now. This would immediately lower the public debt number. It is a simple move of income in the future to income today. But the truth is that selling the student loans book in this fashion is bad for students, bad for taxpayers, and may even undermine the entire ethos of the higher education finance system.

    This article was published by The Conversation on February 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Gill Wyness webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Friday 07 February 2014

    i: Rental revolution about to arrive, as help-to-buy puts more people on the ladder

    market are starting to move their attention beyond London to the regions where, as our index shows, yields are higher." Wind farms and property rates A new study by the London School of Economics due out later this month is expected to show that house values near large wind farms have fallen by around 11 per cent over the last….

    This article appeared in i on the 7 February 2014 (no link available)

    Related Links
    Draft report Link to article
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Friday 07 February 2014

    SERC Conference: 15th-16th May 2014 LSE: Call for Papers from Postgraduate Research

    The Spatial Economics Research Centre was launched in April 2008 to provide high quality independent research on why some regions, cities and communities prosper more than others. It mobilises international expertise and provides information for policy makers to enhance their capacity to diagnose and tackle existing spatial inequalities.

    One significant part of its mission is to contribute to capacity-building in this field by working and networking with young researchers. To pursue this aim, the Centre’s annual conference in May is held over two days, with the first half of the programme devoted to presentations based on current / recent PhD research, and the second to papers by SERC staff and affiliates, relating to the Centre’s own research. These sessions have been very successful in the past in terms of participation and feedback.

    Submissions are invited now for papers to be presented in the PhD / young researcher sessions. Topics should reflect SERC’s broad research agenda and relate to one (or more) of its five programme areas:

    • The scale and nature of UK spatial disparities
    • The causes of place-based effects
    • Housing and land markets
    • The structure and evolution of the spatial economy
    • Spatial economic policy


    Successful applicants will be invited to attend both days of the conference. Financial support for authors of those papers selected for presentation (covering economy travel and budget hotel) will be provided by SERC. The choice of papers will be based on 500 word abstracts which should be sent via email by 28th February to Linda Cleavely [l.f.cleavely@lse.ac.uk], together with information about the author’s affiliations, status and date of PhD submission (if awarded in the last three years). Each presenter will also be expected to serve as a discussant. Authors will be notified of decisions by 10th March. If your paper is accepted, deadline for full paper submissions is 2nd May.

    If you require further information please contact Teresa Schlueter [T.J.Schlueter @lse.ac.uk]

    For more information about SERC and the Annual Conference see http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk

    Thursday 06 February 2014

    The Melbourne Newsroom: Lottery wins make people lurch to the right

    — was conducted by Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee (University of Melbourne and the London School of Economics and Professor Andrew Oswald (University of Warwick), and released as a Warwick Working...

    This article appeared in The Melbourne Newsroom on 6 February 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    Monday 03 February 2014

    Western Morning News: WMN Letters: Wind farm study confirms the obvious

    A recent study by the London School of Economics (to be published during February this year), which looked at 150 wind farms across England and Wales over a period of 12 years...

    This article appeared in Western Morning News on 3 February 2014 link to article

    Related Links Draft report link
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Friday 31 January 2014

    Social Europe Journal: Why An Increase In The US Minimum Wage Is Likely

    Alan Manning looks at the history of the policy since 1938, finding that the federal minimum remains relatively low compared to that in most other OECD countries.

    This article appeared in Social Europe Journal on 31 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Alan Manning webpage
    Labour Markets webpage

    Thursday 30 January 2014

    Cornish Guardian: 'Wind turbines are slashing house prices by 20% in St Enoder...

    property trickier to sell.” A nationwide study published last week by the London School of Economics (LSE) reviewed more than a million homes located near large wind farms over a 12-year and found their property values fell by 11 per cent.

    This article appeared in the Cornish Guardian on 30 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Draft report link
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Thursday 30 January 2014

    National Wind Watch: Wind Energy News: ‘Wind turbines are slashing house prices by 20% in St Enoder parish'

    property trickier to sell.” A nationwide study published last week by the London School of Economics (LSE) reviewed more than a million homes located near large wind farms over a 12-year period, and found their property values fell by 11 per cent...

    This article appeared in National Wind Watch: Wind Energy News on 30 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Draft report link
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Thursday 30 January 2014

    RAC Magazine: Scientists call for push on energy storage

    former UK chief scientific advisor, Lord Richard Layard, programme director at the London School of Economics, and Mark Maslin, professor of climatology at University College London, called for a campaign to secure international renewable energy storage funding.

    This article appeared on RAC Magazine on 30 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    Thursday 30 January 2014

    RAC Magazine: Scientists call for push on energy storage

    former UK chief scientific advisor, Lord Richard Layard, programme director at the London School of Economics, and Mark Maslin, professor of climatology at University College London, called for a campaign to secure international renewable energy storage funding.

    This article appeared on RAC Magazine on 30 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    Tuesday 28 January 2014

    The Carbon Brief (Blog): Mail takes gloomiest view of how windfarms affect house prices

    Mail takes gloomiest view of how windfarms affect house prices Professor Stephen Gibbons, director of the spatial economics research centre at LSE, is in the process of producing a new analysis. His draft paper finds that if more than 20 wind turbines are erected within two kilometres of a house, its value is reduced by about 11 per cent. But it also notes that this is an "extreme case" because homes are rarely situated so close to windfarms.

    This article appeared in the Carbon Brief on 28 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Draft report link
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Monday 27 January 2014

    Spatial Economics Research Centre - blog: Cities outlook 2014: Would UK cities be better off without London?

    Blog posted by Prof Henry G. Overman
    Great to see Centre for Cities latest 'Cities Outlook' report published today. This year, as well as providing a whole range of up-to-date statistics for Britain's cities, the report focuses on London's relationship with the rest of the UK. ... Recognising the importance of size creates all sorts of problems about which places to focus on outside of London. CfC's report dodges the dilemma by making the case for greater localism for all cities. Most politicians choose to behave likewise, focussing on creating opportunities across Britain. But what if reducing the reliance of Britain on London requires us to significantly increase the size of just one or two other cities? Which cities will they be and how will we help them grow? I don't claim to have the answers, but I at least think we should be asking the question.

    The blog piece was posted on the Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) blog on January 27, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website

    Monday 27 January 2014

    Social Europe Journal: Why increasing the minimum wage does not necessarily reduce employment

    Article by Alan Manning
    Alan Manning takes a close look at the economics and the evidence of these claims, finding that one of their basic assumptions, that labor markets are highly competitive, does not hold.

    The article was published by the Social Europe Journal on January 27, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    'Minimum Wages and Wage Inequality: Some Theory and an Application to the UK', Tim Butcher, Richard Dickens and Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1177, November 2012

    Related Links
    Alan Manning webpage
    Labour Markets webpage

    Sunday 26 January 2014

    The Daily Mail: Proof wind turbines take thousands off your home: Value of houses within 1.2 miles of large wind farms slashed by 11%, study finds

    The study by the London School of Economics (LSE) – which looked at more than a million sales of properties close to wind farm sites over a 12-year period – found that values of homes within 1.2 miles of large wind farms were being slashed by about 11 per cent.

    This artilce appeared in the Daily Mail on 26 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Draft report link
    Steve Gibbons webpage

    Wednesday 22 January 2014

    The Financial Times: Protests over axing of 'vital' land price statistics

    In a letter to chancellor George Osborne and business secretary Vince Cable, signatories including Kate Barker - author of a 2004 Labour-commissioned review of housing supply - warn that the decision by the Valuation Office Agency to stop collecting and publishing land price data ''makes it much harder for government to understand the consequences of current policy interventions or to assess the case for future reform''. ... signatories to the letter include Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics.

    The article was published in The Financial Times - Politics and Policy - on January 22, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

    Wednesday 22 January 2014

    Financial Times: Horrors fade but fragility concerns remain

    a host of Nobel-prize winning economists travelling to the forum, Professor Edmund Phelps of Columbia University said the outlook was "good but not great" while Professor Chris Pissarides of the London School of Economics said that outside the eurozone he had "confidence that [countries] can withstand the start of monetary policy normalisation". Unlike José Manuel Barroso, the European Commission president,

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 22 January 2014 link to article

    Also in
    El Espectador
    Davos 2014: desaparecen los horrores, pero sigue la fragilidad, January 22, 2014


    Related Links
    Chris Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage

    Wednesday 22 January 2014

    Adaptation, Green Growth and Urbanization Workshop: 28th-29th January 2014

    LSE’s Grantham Research Institute and the Spatial Economics Research Centre invite you to a joint workshop on adaptation, green growth and urbanization.

    The purpose of the workshop is to bring together work (final or in-progress) addressing key questions and applying innovative methods and approaches at the frontier of adaptation, green growth and urbanisation research.

    The workshop will consist of four sessions, arranged according to four major perspectives (development and growth; spatial; natural hazards; and policy), two key note speakerships and a roundtable with practitioners. For more information including the agenda and how to register, please visit our events page



    Tuesday 21 January 2014

    The Financial Times: The horrors recede but fragilities remain

    The world can wave goodbye to most of the horrors of the past six years, economic experts attending the World Economic Forum this week will tell global leaders.

    High quality global journalism requires investment. Among a host of Nobel-prize winning economists travelling to the Forum, Professor Edmund Phelps of Columbia University said the outlook was ''good, but not great'', while professor Chris Pissarides of the London School of Economics said that outside the eurozone he had ''confidence that [countries] can withstand the start of monetary policy normalisation''.

    This article was published in The Financial Times on January 21, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Chris Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage

    Tuesday 14 January 2014

    SERC News: International Growth Centre Lecture

    Ed Glaeser is giving this year’s International Growth Centre public lecture on 20 January, 6:30 at LSE. More details here

    Thursday 09 January 2014

    Study: American Firms Get A for Management: FoxBusiness.com

    U.K.-born Bloom was awarded the Ewing Marion Kauffman medal, a $50,000 prize given annually to a scholar under 40 who has distinguished himself in the study of entrepreneurship. Bloom’s recent work takes a look at manufacturing businesses in 30 different countries, including the United States. “American firms are incredibly well-managed on our chart. They have the best management practices in the world,” says Bloom. He says it’s unsurprising that for the most part the best-known global companies are headquartered in the U.S.

    This article appeared on Fox Business News online on 9 January 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    Productivity and Innovation webpage

    Saturday 04 January 2014

    The Telegraph (web): HS2: Government ministers sat on critical report by Department for Transport

    The report, by the accountants KPMG, has been repeatedly quoted by ministers - including the Chancellor, George Osborne - to defend their £43 billion scheme... The KPMG research has already been substantially discredited, with one former member of the Government's HS2 advisory panel, Prof Henry Overman, saying it was ''technically wrong'' and ''essentially made up''.

    This article was published online by the Telegraph on January 4, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece 16 (3) Winter 2012


    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC Programme website

    Thursday 12 December 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: Dismantle the euro, says Nobel Prize winner

    Sir Christopher Pissarides, who won the Nobel Prize for economics in 2010, will today suggest that the euro should be dismantled. In a speech at the London School of Economics, the Cypriot-British economist will say the single currency is creating a ''lost generation'' of unemployed youngsters. ''The euro should either be dismantled in an orderly way or the leading members should do the necessary as fast as possible to make it growth and employment-friendly.''

    This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on December 12, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage
    Christopher Pissarides CEP publications webpage

    Thursday 12 December 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: Dismantle the euro, says Nobel Prize winner

    Sir Christopher Pissarides, who won the Nobel Prize for economics in 2010, will today suggest that the euro should be dismantled. In a speech at the London School of Economics, the Cypriot-British economist will say the single currency is creating a ''lost generation'' of unemployed youngsters. ''The euro should either be dismantled in an orderly way or the leading members should do the necessary as fast as possible to make it growth and employment-friendly.''

    This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on December 12, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage
    Christopher Pissarides CEP publications webpage

    Tuesday 10 December 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: Pay rises are making a comeback - here's how we make sure they stay

    Greedy capitalists are sometimes also blamed for falling wages. That is nonsense. In many other countries capital has grabbed a greater share of the economic pie in recent years. However, this has not happened in the UK, a vitally important but almost entirely overlooked fact. Over the past quarter of a century, the share of GDP going to employees in wages, salaries, pension contributions, benefits and social costs has remained roughly the same. It has averaged 54pc of GDP and varied from 51pc in 1996 to 56pc in 1991. When including the self-employed, the share has also remained constant, averaging 59pc (in a 57pc to 61pc range). This is extremely important data, first revealed in a ground-breaking paper by João Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics.

    The article was published in the Daily Telegraph on December 10, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Wage growth and productivity growth: the myth and reality of 'decoupling', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
    'Decoupling of Wage Growth and Productivity Growth? Myth and Reality', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1246, October 2013

    Related links
    Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Tuesday 10 December 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: Pay rises are making a comeback - here's how we make sure they stay

    Greedy capitalists are sometimes also blamed for falling wages. That is nonsense. In many other countries capital has grabbed a greater share of the economic pie in recent years. However, this has not happened in the UK, a vitally important but almost entirely overlooked fact. Over the past quarter of a century, the share of GDP going to employees in wages, salaries, pension contributions, benefits and social costs has remained roughly the same. It has averaged 54pc of GDP and varied from 51pc in 1996 to 56pc in 1991. When including the self-employed, the share has also remained constant, averaging 59pc (in a 57pc to 61pc range). This is extremely important data, first revealed in a ground-breaking paper by João Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics.

    The article was published in the Daily Telegraph on December 10, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Wage growth and productivity growth: the myth and reality of 'decoupling', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
    'Decoupling of Wage Growth and Productivity Growth? Myth and Reality', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1246, October 2013

    Related links
    Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Thursday 21 November 2013

    Guardian: Research will create policy that encourages local economic growth

    LSE what works centre and the government will together drive evidence to the heart of policymaking. Article by Henry Overman
    What can policy do to increase local economic growth? This question continues to perplex and challenge policymakers and academics. In a period where government is faced with slow growth and is considering how best to devolve power, the question has assumed increased importance. Careful research and evaluation are crucial to answering it. Understanding and assessing evidence is not always easy for policymakers facing the day-to-day challenge of delivering better economic outcomes for their communities. This is where the recently established what works centre for local economic growth comes in. The centre, a collaboration between the LSE, the Centre for Cities and Arup, will review policy areas such as employment, skills, housing and regeneration and will provide policymakers with the evidence and insights they need to design and deliver services that will drive local economic growth and employment.

    This article was published by the Guardian on November 21, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Saturday 16 November 2013

    Daily Telegraph: HS2 is bad value, and that's a fact

    HS2 is poor value for money compared with other transport plans, and may well be poor value for money compared with alternatives that address exactly the same set of problems.

    This article was published in the Daily Telegraph on November 16, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related Links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC Programme website

    Tuesday 12 November 2013

    BBC Radio 2 - Today Programme: Lord Heseltine: HS2 can 'regenerate' areas

    Lord Heseltine has come out fighting in favour of the HS2 high speed rail project. In a speech on Tuesday, the former Conservative Cabinet minister said supporting HS2 is as much an act of faith as a reliance on figures, and the UK ''must consider carefully the cost of not acting'' over HS2. Professor Henry Overman, a former member of the HS2 analytical challenge panel, believes ''on the balance of the evidence we've got available to us, HS2 remains not particularly good value for money compared to other transport projects.''

    The interview was broadcast on BBC Radio 2's Today Programme on November 12, 2013
    Link to piece here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website


    Monday 11 November 2013

    City AM: The Greenbelt sacred cow: It pens in the poor for no environmental gain

    Article by Paul Cheshire
    While research I did in the 1980s showed that there was a small but measurable value of Greenbelts for people who lived near them, recent research by colleagues at the London School of Economics, using data on more than 1m house transactions, showed this had gone.

    Thsi article was published in City AM on November 11, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    SERC blog - Should we build on the Green Belt?, Henry Overman, 29 June 2013

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 06 November 2013

    Financial Times: KPMG defends key HS2 report

    However, concerns about the KPMG report, surfaced when the FT revealed misgivings about it among some of the government's own advisers. Dan Graham, a professor of statistical modelling at Imperial College London, told the committee of MPs on Tuesday ''I don't think the statistical work is reliable''. Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics and a former adviser on HS2, went further. ''They [KPMG] apply this procedure which is essentially made up, which provides them with an estimate. It is something that really shouldn't be done in a situation where we are trying to inform public debate using statistical analysis.'' Prof Overman said he thought the £15bn estimate could be overstated by a factor of six to eight.

    This article was published by the Financial Times online on November 6, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 06 November 2013

    Mail online UK (web): 15bn boost from HS2 is a sham, MPs are told

    Calculations used by ministers to justify the controversial £50billion high-speed rail scheme were 'essentially made up', a former Government adviser told Treasury watchdogs yesterday. Professor Henry Overman was one of a number of academics giving testimony to MPs which undermined the ministerial case for the 351-mile HS2 line from London to Birmingham and the North. Government-commissioned accountants denied 'cherrypicking' figures to over-egg the benefits of the scheme. But Professor Overman, who specialises in economic geography at the London School of Economics, said he had resigned from the Government's high-speed rail advisory panel after believing its role had changed from giving independent advice to actively promoting the controversial project.

    This article was published online by mail online UK on November 6, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 06 November 2013

    i (the paper for today): GBP15bn HS2 benefit has no 'statistical basis', MPs told

    ''I don't think the statistical work [in the KPMG report] is reliable. There are problems with the numbers they have generated.'' Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, said that there was ''no statistical basis'' for the KPMG £15bn annual benefit figure.

    The article was published in i (the paper for today) on November 6, 2013
    [No link available]

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 06 November 2013

    City AM: Experts pour cold water on HS2 benefits

    £15bn a year for the British economy, and Treasury select committee chair Andrew Tyrie said afterwards that the claim ''has no firm statistical foundation''. Henry Overman, a professor at the London School of Economics who formerly advised the government on HS2, said KPMG, which provided the forecast, ''applied this procedure which is essentially made up''.

    This article was published in City AM on November 6, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 06 November 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: HS2 benefits are made up, MPs told

    The £50billion HS2 scheme were ''essentially made up'' a former member of Whitehall's high speed rail advisory panel has told MPs. Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics said he had quit the panel after he felt its role changed from providing independent advice to promoting the project.

    This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on November 6, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Saturday 02 November 2013

    Japan Times: Can Japanese really be such cold sushi in the sack?

    The Well-being Program at the London School of Economics' Center for Economic Performance rates ''making love'' as the activity that makes us happiest. So, with Japan scoring low on both frequency and satisfaction, it wouldn't bode well for its national Happiness Index - if it had one - or for the welfare of the nation as a whole.

    This article was published in the Japan Times on November 2, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Are you happy while you work?, Alex Bryson and George MacKerron. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1 Summer 2013
    'Are you happy while you work?', Alex Bryson and George MacKerron, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1187, February 2013

    Related links
    Alex Bryson webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Thursday 24 October 2013

    Research Centre Launch: What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth

    A ground-breaking new project that will analyse and showcase the policies that can help to drive local economic growth has been launched at a national event with Kris Hopkins MP, Minister for Local Growth, Michael Fallon MP, Minister for Business, and Joanna Killian, Chief Executive of Essex County Council.

    The What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth, a partnership between LSE, Centre for Cities and Arup, will put evaluations of the policies that matter to growth - skills, regeneration, housing and employment - under the spotlight to give local decision makers the evidence they need about which policies work. It will improve evaluation standards so that we can learn more about what policies are most effective and where, and it will work with local partners to set up a series of demonstrator projects to show how effective evaluation can work in practice.

    Professor Henry Overman, Director of the Centre, said: "The evidence base covering local growth policy areas like skills, housing and employment is huge and this can be overwhelming for policymakers. The What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth will help local decision makers use the available evidence to make better informed decisions about which policies are most likely to drive local growth and where."

    Read full story on LSE news webpage



    Saturday 19 October 2013

    MSN UK (Web): Cities 'could lose £220m' over HS2

    Professor Henry Overman from the London School of Economics - formerly an expert adviser to HS2 Ltd - told the BBC it was obvious that, as some cities, towns and regions reap the benefits of being better connected.

    This article appeared on MSN UK (Web) on October 19, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Saturday 19 October 2013

    BBC web: High-speed rail 'losers' revealed

    ...to Birmingham and to Manchester and Leeds. The Department for Transport say ultimately the line would reduce journey times to Edinburgh and Glasgow by an hour. Professor Henry Overman from the London School of Economics - formerly an expert adviser to HS2 Ltd - told the BBC it was obvious that, as some cities, towns and regions reap the benefits of being better connected, other places away from the line will pay a price.

    This news article appeared on the BBC news website on October 19, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Saturday 19 October 2013

    The Sunday Express (Scotland): Scots lose out in HS2 rail bonanza

    Professor Henry Overman from the London School of Economics - formerly an expert adviser to HS2 Ltd - told Newsnight it was obvious that, as some cities, towns and regions reap the benefits of being better connected, other places away from the line will pay a price.

    The article was published in The Sunday Express (Scotland) on October 19, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Saturday 19 October 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: Towns not on HS2 line will lose out

    Henry Overman, professor in economic geography at the London School of Economics, told BBC's Newsnight: ''If you are on the line, you get a productivity improvement.''

    This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on October 19, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Monday 14 October 2013

    Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty: What would be the impact on the global economy if Washington defaulted?

    Among the first to feel the impact would be foreign countries, institutions, and market funds that have bought U.S. Treasury bills as a safe way to keep money and earn interest. ''If there were an outright default on Treasury [bill] obligations, there is no doubt that would create huge chaos in financial markets'', says Ethan Ilzetzki, a professor of economics at the London School of Economics. ''For one thing, these assets are used as reserves by many private banks, by many central banks, and if their value suddenly plummeted it is hard to fathom the exact implications of that.''

    This article was published online by Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty on October 14, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Ethan Ilzetzki webpage
    Macro Programme webpage
    Ethan Ilzetzki CEP publications webpage

    Wednesday 09 October 2013

    Time: London's tale of two cities: inequality worsens in Europe's booming metropolis

    In London, Europe's fastest growing city, the problem is made uniquely more acute by the constraints of its metropolitan green belt - an inviolable stretch of green land that rings the city, designed to prevent urban sprawl. Paul Cheshire, professor Emeritus of economic geography at the London School of Economics, describes it as ''a peculiarly English form of exclusionary zoning'' and argues in a piece for the news website the Conversation that it is in part to blame for the housing crisis.

    This article was published in Time on October 9, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    SERC website

    Sunday 15 September 2013

    The Sunday Telegraph: HS2 will clog up the rail system, warns freight expert

    Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, described the KPMG report as ''technically wrong'' in parts of analysis and ''possibly out by orders of magnitude'' in its results. ''I can imagine why the Government rushed this report out but it would appear to add very little, if anything, to the debate'', he said.

    The article was published in The Sunday Telegraph on September 15, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 11 September 2013

    TradeArabia (business news information): UAE tops GCC in 'happiness index'

    The UEA has topped Gulf states by positioning itself 14th globally in the World Happiness Report 2013 published by the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network. The report was edited by University of British Columbia...and London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance well-being programme director Lord Richard Layard ...

    This article was printed by TradeArabia on September 11, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Tuesday 10 September 2013

    Financial Times: Foreign players in the property game

    For Henry Overman, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, there is a simple explanation for London's house prices: ''you just need to do the maths.'' ''In the [2011] census the population went up by 4m but we built 1.4m homes in a decade'', he says, adding that the trend was seen outside London where there were far fewer foreign buyers. ''In southern Manchester, property prices are pretty high relative to incomes, which is put down to a supply constraint and domestic demand ... prices are high in most successful places in Britain.''

    This article was published in the Financial Times on September 10, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage

    Monday 09 September 2013

    CBC Ottawa: Canada ranks 6th in global happiness survey

    Canada has some of the happiest people on the planet because of long life expectancy, high average income and robust social ties, according to a survey sponsored by the United Nations in which Canada ranked sixth. The report, coedited by John Helliwell with Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of development and health policy at Columbia University in New York, and London School of Economics professor emeritus Richard Layard, suggests more countries use citizen happiness as a measure of progress, citing the South Asian kingdom of Bhutan, which has developed a Gross National Happiness Index and aims above all to maximize it.

    The news item was broadcast by CBC Canada on September 9, 2013
    Link to item here

    Related publications
    'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
    Details


    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Monday 09 September 2013

    CBC Ottawa: Canada ranks 6th in global happiness survey

    Canada has some of the happiest people on the planet because of long life expectancy, high average income and robust social ties, according to a survey sponsored by the United Nations in which Canada ranked sixth. The report, coedited by John Helliwell with Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of development and health policy at Columbia University in New York, and London School of Economics professor emeritus Richard Layard, suggests more countries use citizen happiness as a measure of progress, citing the South Asian kingdom of Bhutan, which has developed a Gross National Happiness Index and aims above all to maximize it.

    The news item was broadcast by CBC Canada on September 9, 2013
    Link to item here

    Related publications
    'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
    Details


    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Monday 09 September 2013

    CBC Ottawa: Canada ranks 6th in global happiness survey

    Canada has some of the happiest people on the planet because of long life expectancy, high average income and robust social ties, according to a survey sponsored by the United Nations in which Canada ranked sixth. The report, coedited by John Helliwell with Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of development and health policy at Columbia University in New York, and London School of Economics professor emeritus Richard Layard, suggests more countries use citizen happiness as a measure of progress, citing the South Asian kingdom of Bhutan, which has developed a Gross National Happiness Index and aims above all to maximize it.

    The news item was broadcast by CBC Canada on September 9, 2013
    Link to item here

    Related publications
    'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
    Details


    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Tuesday 27 August 2013

    Valuewalk.com: Five out-of-office ways to invigorate your career this fall

    Even if you are not heading back to school, fall can be a great time to energize your career. Here are five ways you can boost your job performance and your overall career satisfaction - and they all involve new beginnings.
    Sources: Layard, Richard. Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Penguin Press, 2005

    This article was published online by Valuewalk.com on August 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Richard Layard, Penguin Press, 2nd edition, 2011
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy webpage

    Tuesday 27 August 2013

    Valuewalk.com: Five out-of-office ways to invigorate your career this fall

    Even if you are not heading back to school, fall can be a great time to energize your career. Here are five ways you can boost your job performance and your overall career satisfaction - and they all involve new beginnings.
    Sources: Layard, Richard. Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Penguin Press, 2005

    This article was published online by Valuewalk.com on August 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Richard Layard, Penguin Press, 2nd edition, 2011
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy webpage

    Tuesday 27 August 2013

    BBC Radio 4 PM Programme: News

    Henry Overman discussed HS2.

    The news item was aired on BBC Radio 4 News on August 27, 2013


    Related publications
    HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Thursday 22 August 2013

    Moneycontrol.com: The correlation between money and happiness

    Does a higher income make people happier? The jury is still out on this. Between the two polar studies, several researchers tried to bring money and happiness together by establishing a threshold till which they hold hands before parting ways. For instance, in 2003, British economist Richard Layard set $15,000 as the point beyond which money does not fetch happiness. In his 2005 work, Layard reset the point at $20,000 a year.

    This article was published by Moneycontrol.com on August 22,2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2nd edition, Penguin, April 2011
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy webpage

    Thursday 22 August 2013

    Moneycontrol.com: The correlation between money and happiness

    Does a higher income make people happier? The jury is still out on this. Between the two polar studies, several researchers tried to bring money and happiness together by establishing a threshold till which they hold hands before parting ways. For instance, in 2003, British economist Richard Layard set $15,000 as the point beyond which money does not fetch happiness. In his 2005 work, Layard reset the point at $20,000 a year.

    This article was published by Moneycontrol.com on August 22,2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2nd edition, Penguin, April 2011
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy webpage

    Tuesday 20 August 2013

    Guardian: Warwick policy lab to use Birmingham as 'testing ground' for ideas

    'What works' is not new from deliverology and the 'third way' through the Blair years to the what works centres. In Birmingham we have, for example, worked closely with Lord Heseltine following his ''no stone unturned'' report on economic growth. Lord Adonis is undertaking similar analysis for the Labour party. And, most recently, a new 'what works' centre on local economic growth has been announced which will be led by professor Henry Overman at the LSE.

    This article was published in the Guardian on August 20, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Friday 16 August 2013

    Atlantic Monthly: Entrepreneurship: the ultimate white privilege?

    Ross Levine, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley, and Yona Rubinstein, a professor at the London School of Economics, have released a fascinating working paper exploring the demographics, personality traits, and earnings of entrepreneurs.

    This article was published in the Atlantic Monthly on August 16, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Smart and Illicit: Who Becomes an Entrepreneur and Does it Pay?', Ross Levine and Yona Rubinstein, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1237, August 2013.

    Related links
    Yona Rubinstein webpage
    Labour Markets programme webpage
    Communities Programme webpage

    Thursday 15 August 2013

    The Scotsman: Education 'has failed to improve with devolution'

    Academics at the London School of Economics (LSE) said that while the Scottish system remains on a par with those elsewhere in the UK, it has not progressed at the same rate as the English system since 1999. The authors of the report note that the performance of the education system is one of the questions that voters may consider in the run-up to next year's independence referendum. Written by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, of LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, the report states: ''Our analysis of national statistics showed that Scotland's performance has been very stable over time whilst, in contrast, England's performance has been increasing.''

    This article was published by The Scotsman on August 15, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Education in Scotland: performance in a devolved policy area, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013
    'Education in a Devolved Scotland A Quantitative Analysis. A Report to the Economic and Social Research Council', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.30, May 2013

    Related links
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Sandra McNally webpage
    Gill Wyness webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Thursday 15 August 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: Here's how to avoid thousands in tax - don't buy a house

    An LSE study of the most recent duty ''holiday'' found that a 1 per cent cut in the tax increased the number of transactions by 20 per cent. Most of those extra transactions were genuine, not just people moving a month or two earlier or later due to the temporary tax break.

    This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on August 15, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'The Effect of the UK Stamp Duty Land Tax on Household Mobility', Christian A. L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikainen, SERC Discussion Paper No.115, July 2012

    Related links
    Christian A. L. Hilber webpage
    Teemu Lyytikainen webpage
    SERC website

    Monday 12 August 2013

    Forbes India - Magazine: The correlation between money and happiness

    Money and happiness have been married and divorced umpteen times by economists. A recent study by University of Michigan professors Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers united moolah and mirth after Richard Easterlin, an economist and professor at the University of South Carolina, separated them in 1974. While the Easterlin Paradox stated that rise in income does not necessarily increase happiness, the new research refutes it by proving that the higher the income or the GDP (Gross Domestic Product), the more happy the person or the country is. No conditions apply. Between the two polar studies, several researchers tried to bring money and happiness together by establishing a threshold till which they hold hands before parting ways. For instance, in 2003, British economist Richard Layard set $15,000 as the point beyond which money does not fetch happiness. In his 2005 work, Layard reset the point at $20,000 a year.

    This article was published by Forbes India on August 12, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2nd edition, Penguin, April 2011
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy webpage

    Monday 12 August 2013

    The Daily Mirror: British workers suffer one of biggest falls in real wages in Europe

    Economics commentator Professor John Van Reenen yesterday described the wages dip in the UK since the first of George Osborne's austerity budgets as ''stunning''.

    This article was published in The Daily Mirror on August 12, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation programme webpage

    Saturday 10 August 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: Put hated stamp duty to a worthy cause

    But does it really distort behaviour? A fascinating but little-noticed research paper published last year by the Spatial Economics Research Centre, part of the London School of Economics, provides an interesting take. The study showed that raising stamp duty from 1pc to 3pc reduced household mobility by around 40pc, so the tax is not just on house buyers but also on businesses.

    This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on August 10, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'The Effect of the UK Stamp Duty Land Tax on Household Mobility', Christian A. L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikainen, SERC Discussion Paper No.115, July 2012

    Related links
    Christian A. L. Hilber webpage
    Teemu Lyytikainen webpage
    SERC website

    Saturday 27 July 2013

    The Financial Times: Class worrier

    The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

    This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
    Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
    Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

    Related Links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Saturday 27 July 2013

    The Financial Times: Class worrier

    The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

    This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
    Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
    Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

    Related Links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Saturday 27 July 2013

    The Financial Times: Class worrier

    The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

    This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
    Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
    Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

    Related Links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Saturday 27 July 2013

    The Financial Times: Class worrier

    The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

    This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
    Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
    Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

    Related Links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Saturday 27 July 2013

    The Financial Times: Class worrier

    The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

    This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
    Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
    Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

    Related Links
    Jo Blanden webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    Sunday 21 July 2013

    The Sunday Times: It's the middle class's empty quarter

    A recent study from the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the London School of Economics points out that, in many countries, the second-largest city is half the size of the largest and the third-largest is a third of the size.

    This article was published in The Sunday Times on July 21, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The economic future of British cities, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 10 July 2013

    Washington Post: Obama: ‘I remember when I first saw ''Star Wars''

    Here are five things we're reading/watching today:
    that a study out of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science was conducted using a smartphone app. Cleaning the house and waiting on line were more pleasant than work, according to the study's findings.

    This article was published in the Washington Post on July 10, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Are you happy while you work?, Alex Bryson and George MacKerron. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1 Summer 2013
    'Are you happy while you work?', Alex Bryson and George MacKerron, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1187, February 2013

    Related links
    Alex Bryson webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Wednesday 03 July 2013

    San Francisco Weekly News: Outside the gates: Unions versus big tech

    Security guards for Google and Apple don't get the legendary benefits offered by the tech giants. The union is trying to change that, but the guards aren't playing along and the tech companies are oblivious...
    ...Competition also keeps costs down. If SIS (Security Industry Specialists Inc.) were beholden to union demands, then it might have to throw more money at its workforce: The security company would no longer have the flexibility to underbid its competitors. Since Apple and Google's bottom line is economic, rather than altruistic, they'd logically just switch to another contractor, says [Nicholas] Bloom.

    This article was published in the San Francisco Weekly News on July 3, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Nicholas Bloom webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Wednesday 03 July 2013

    San Francisco Weekly News: Outside the gates: Unions versus big tech

    Security guards for Google and Apple don't get the legendary benefits offered by the tech giants. The union is trying to change that, but the guards aren't playing along and the tech companies are oblivious...
    ...Competition also keeps costs down. If SIS (Security Industry Specialists Inc.) were beholden to union demands, then it might have to throw more money at its workforce: The security company would no longer have the flexibility to underbid its competitors. Since Apple and Google's bottom line is economic, rather than altruistic, they'd logically just switch to another contractor, says [Nicholas] Bloom.

    This article was published in the San Francisco Weekly News on July 3, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Nicholas Bloom webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Wednesday 26 June 2013

    The Independent: Let's go mad for Manchester - and beyond

    Now some work by the LSE suggests that the problem is not that London is too big, but rather that Britain's other cities are too small. Professor Henry Overman, director of its Spatial Economics Research Centre has concluded that we should allow successful provincial cities such as Manchester to grow even faster by loosening planning controls and improving education and other services there.

    This article appeared in the Independent on 26 July 2013 link to article

    Related publications
    The Economic Future of British Cities, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013 link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 05 June 2013

    Financial Times: Fall in joblessness fails to prove Spain's case for economic revival

    But my sense is they will only do the reforms that are impossible to avoid and where there is strong pressure from the EU, said Luis Garicano of the London School of Economics. Both private sector economists and academics have warned of the danger of complacency, arguing the government must not succumb to reform fatigue.

    This article appeared in Financial Times on 5 June 2013 link to article

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Tuesday 04 June 2013

    Financial Times: Brum belittled

    A warning about heavy-handed efforts to redirect activity can be taken from an extract from a history of Birmingham republished by Henry Overman of London School of Economics, on his blog.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 4 June 2013 link to article

    Related publications
    Booming Birmingham and the Need for Rebalancing Henry Overman, SERC blog, 28 May 2013


    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage
    SERC website website

    Thursday 16 May 2013

    Guardian: Why is unemployment not higher? Lousy wages

    In the worst recovery for over a century, the collapse in wages lets firms keep on labour. Low demand is the real problem
    Article by John Van Reenen
    So much for the "green shoots" of recovery that the Bank of England signalled on Wednesday when the outgoing governor, Sir Mervyn King, predicted modest higher economic growth this year. The UK jobs figures released on the same day by the Office for National Statistics tell a sorry tale. Almost five years since the crisis started, we have 2.52 million people unemployed - that's 7.8% of the labour force - and the numbers for the first quarter of 2013 are up by 15,000 from the last quarter of 2012.

    This article was published in The Guardian on May 16, 2013
    Link to article here

    Also in
    Malaysia Sun
    Why is unemployment not higher? Lousy wages


    Related publications
    British Politics and Policy blog at LSE: Jobs, wages and poor growth
    John Van Reenen, May 15 2013

    Related links
    JohnVan Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Tuesday 14 May 2013

    Financial Times: Chinese lessons for Yahoo's boss

    Although that particular form of indolence known as "working from home" is out of fashion at Yahoo, where Ms Mayer has told staff to work from the office, it is getting its first tentative trials in China. One local government in Shanghai is trying to promote the concept by working with Ctrip, China's largest, Nasdaq-listed travel agency. Ctrip told local Chinese news that it had lowered its usual requirements for age and appearance, and focused more on honesty and responsibility when deciding which employees should be allowed to work without coming to the office. The company's CEO, James Liang, wrote up Ctrip's nine-month experiment in home-working with Stanford University professor Nicholas Bloom, concluding that performance increased dramatically and attrition fell sharply - while the company saved about $2,000 per employee per year worked at home.

    This article was published in the Financial Times on May 14, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment', Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1194, March 2013

    Related links
    Nicholas Bloom webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Monday 13 May 2013

    BBC World Service: Business Edition with Tanya Beckett

    Professor Albrecht Ritschl was interviewed from Berlin about World War 2 reparations.

    The interview was broadcast by the BBC World Service on May 13, 2013

    Related publications
    'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

    Related links
    Albrecht Ritschl webpage
    Macro Programme webpage

    Thursday 09 May 2013

    Evening Standard: Time to unblock the growth path

    It should not be as difficult as we seem to make it. A working group at the London School of Economics pointed out a few months ago that growth is neither about the size of the state or about deregulation. It is about whether the state is smart in the way it regulates and spends. We need well-designed policies to support growth and we need an institutional framework that delivers good policy.

    This article appeared in the Evening Standard on May 9, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    LSE Growth Commission Report - Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation, by Philippe Aghion, Timothy Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen, January 2013

    Related links
    Francesco Caselli webpage
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    LSE Growth Commission website

    Sunday 28 April 2013

    The Observer: New research shows that crime doesn't rise in high immigration areas - it falls

    Experts from the London School of Economics set out to examine if the common assertion that immigrants cause crime was corroborated by statistics, after noting a "paucity of credible empirical evidence" to support the claim. Places that had attracted large numbers of eastern European immigrants enjoyed a "significant fall in property crime", a category of offence that also includes theft and shoplifting. The report, to be published later this year in Harvard University's Review of Economics and Statistics, also found that the relationship between the arrival of thousands of foreigners and levels of violence was "close to zero and insignificant". Brian Bell, a research fellow at the London School of Economics, said: "The view that foreigners commit more crime is not true. The truth is that immigrants are just like natives: if they have a good job and a good income they don't commit crime."

    This article appeared in The Observer on 28 April 2013 link to article

    Related publications
    "Immigrant Enclaves and Crime", Brian Bell and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1104, December 2011

    Related links
    Brian Bell webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Community Programme webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Thursday 04 April 2013

    The Daily Telegraph: Family, not money, is the key to your child's performance at school

    Here's a piece of news that will send a certain kind of educationalist screaming from the room: family, not income, is key to a child's school performance. The London School of Economics, bastion of Left-of-centre thinking on all serious issues, conducted the study on disadvantaged children in England. They found that growing up in an impoverished area did not doom the children to do badly at school.

    This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 4 April 2013 link to article

    Related links
    See Felix Weinhardt webpage for publications link to article
    SERC website link

    Thursday 04 April 2013

    The Daily Mail: Family, not area, is key to a child's education: Children with parents who spent extra year in education get better grades

    A report's findings indicate it is the attitude towards education within their family unit that really matters. The research involved two groups of disadvantaged children in cities across England, all of whom were waiting to move into social housing in some of the most deprived neighbourhoods...Dr Felix Weinhardt, who conducted the research, said: "We have always tried to help the most disadvantaged children to get better life chances and one of the ways we thought we could do this is through housing policy." "But research now increasingly tells us that bad neighbourhood environments have no causal influence on these children's school performances at all." The postdoctoral fellow in the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance added: "These two groups of students really get very bad grades - very similar to students who live in high-density social housing neighbourhoods and never moved."

    This article appreared in the Daily Mail on 4 April 2013 link to article

    Related links
    See Felix Weinhardt webpage for publications link to webpage
    SERC Website

    Thursday 04 April 2013

    The Daily Mail: Family, not area, is key to a child's education: Children with parents who spent extra year in education get better grades

    A report's findings indicate it is the attitude towards education within their family unit that really matters. The research involved two groups of disadvantaged children in cities across England, all of whom were waiting to move into social housing in some of the most deprived neighbourhoods...Dr Felix Weinhardt, who conducted the research, said: "We have always tried to help the most disadvantaged children to get better life chances and one of the ways we thought we could do this is through housing policy." "But research now increasingly tells us that bad neighbourhood environments have no causal influence on these children's school performances at all." The postdoctoral fellow in the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance added: "These two groups of students really get very bad grades - very similar to students who live in high-density social housing neighbourhoods and never moved."

    This article appreared in the Daily Mail on 4 April 2013 link to article

    Related links
    See Felix Weinhardt webpage for publications link to webpage
    SERC Website

    Thursday 04 April 2013

    The Daily Mail: Family, not area, is key to a child's education: Children with parents who spent extra year in education get better grades

    A report's findings indicate it is the attitude towards education within their family unit that really matters. The research involved two groups of disadvantaged children in cities across England, all of whom were waiting to move into social housing in some of the most deprived neighbourhoods...Dr Felix Weinhardt, who conducted the research, said: "We have always tried to help the most disadvantaged children to get better life chances and one of the ways we thought we could do this is through housing policy." "But research now increasingly tells us that bad neighbourhood environments have no causal influence on these children's school performances at all." The postdoctoral fellow in the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance added: "These two groups of students really get very bad grades - very similar to students who live in high-density social housing neighbourhoods and never moved."

    This article appreared in the Daily Mail on 4 April 2013 link to article

    Related links
    See Felix Weinhardt webpage for publications link to webpage
    SERC Website

    Friday 15 March 2013

    The Economist: Planning reform: Pillow fight

    Converting office buildings is expensive, notes Adam Challis, of Jones Lang LaSalle. So much cheap office space will remain for businesses to rent, even if some disappears from city centres. As Henry Overman, of the London School of Economics, points out, rising rents have pushed Shoreditch's tech firms farther out into east London - not out of business altogether.

    This article appeared in the Economist on 15 March 2013 link to artilce

    Related publications
    The UK's housing crises Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece 17(3), Winter 2012
    Related links

    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website webpage
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage
    SERC blog: http://spatial-economics.blogspot.co.uk

    Friday 15 March 2013

    Centre for Cities: In conversation with...Prof Henry Overman

    This is the first in a series of podcasts the Centre for Cities will be recording with the London School of Economics examining key issues affecting UK economies. In advance of the 2013 Budget, Alexandra Jones, Chief Executive of Centre for Cities talks to Professor Henry Overman Director of the Spatial Economic Research Centre at LSE about the effectiveness of current policy in stimulating economic growth in cities. What can policy do to support places to unlock their potential?

    This article appeared on Centre for Cities on 15 March 2013 link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC website
    Henry Overman CEP publications webpage

    Saturday 09 March 2013

    The Economist: Credit in the euro area: still crunching

    A recent paper by Luis Garicano and Claudia Steinwender of the London School of Economics looked at the impact of financial constraints in Spain. By comparing firms that are foreign-owned, and therefore have access to other forms of financing, with those that are domestic, and so rely on local banks, the authors can see what uncertainty about financial access did to their decision-making after the 2008 crisis. The Spanish-owned firms cut investment by 19 percent more than the foreign-owned companies, and reduced employment by 6 percent more.

    The article was published in The Economist on March 9, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Survive Another Day: Does Uncertain Financing Affect the Composition of Investment?', Luis Garicano and Claudia Steinwender, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1188, February 2013

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Claudia Steinwender webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Saturday 09 March 2013

    The Economist: Credit in the euro area: still crunching

    A recent paper by Luis Garicano and Claudia Steinwender of the London School of Economics looked at the impact of financial constraints in Spain. By comparing firms that are foreign-owned, and therefore have access to other forms of financing, with those that are domestic, and so rely on local banks, the authors can see what uncertainty about financial access did to their decision-making after the 2008 crisis. The Spanish-owned firms cut investment by 19 percent more than the foreign-owned companies, and reduced employment by 6 percent more.

    The article was published in The Economist on March 9, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Survive Another Day: Does Uncertain Financing Affect the Composition of Investment?', Luis Garicano and Claudia Steinwender, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1188, February 2013

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Claudia Steinwender webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    Friday 08 March 2013

    TES: Australia debates pros and cons of low apprentice pay

    Wages are high in general in Australia, but the minimum apprentice wage is more than double the average pay for apprentices in countries such as Austria and Switzerland, according to a 2010 report by Hilary Steedman at the London School of Economics. Dr Steedman has argued that the success of apprenticeships in these countries and in Germany is due to low initial wages, which encourages the employer to invest in training.

    This article was published in the TES Comment online on March 8, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The State of Apprenticeship in 2010: International Comparisons - Australia, Austria, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland. A Report for the Apprenticeship Ambassadors Network by Hilary Steedman, CEP Special Report No.22, September 2010

    Related links
    Hilary Steedman webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage

    Thursday 07 February 2013

    INSEAD: Dirty little habits: cleaning up the auto industry

    Dirty habits die hard and the only way to encourage auto makers to adopt clean technology is a short sharp shock in the fuel price. It's a radical approach, but research suggests it could work. David Hemous and his co researchers - Philippe Aghion of Harvard University and Antoine Dechezlepretre, Ralf Martin and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics - analysed data on auto industry technology patents over several decades. They distinguished between "dirty" technologies (petrol and diesel engines) and "clean" technology (electric and hybrid) and wanted to identify what could influence auto makers to adopt innovative, clean technology. Since 1978 globally, "dirty" patents outnumbered "clean technology" patents by a ratio of 3:1.

    This article was published online by INSEAD on February 7, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Carbon Taxes, Path Dependency and Directed Technical Change: Evidence from the Auto Industry', Philippe Aghion, Antoine Dechezlepretre, David Hemous, Ralf Martin and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1178, November 2012

    Related links
    Ralf Martin webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    Wednesday 30 January 2013

    You Tube (video): A Manifesto for Growth: The LSE Growth Commission Report

    The UK has failed to invest in key areas needed for long-term growth. How can we change this? Professor John Van Reenen, Director of CEP and co-chair of the LSE Growth Commission, presents a 'manifesto for growth' for the UK economy over the next 50 years, backed up by the Growth Commission's report.

    The interview was posted on You Tube on January 30, 2013
    Link to video here

    Related publications
    LSE Growth Commission Report - 'Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation', by Philippe Aghion, Timothy Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen, January 2013
    Download

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    LSE Growth Commission website

    Wednesday 30 January 2013

    You Tube (video): A Manifesto for Growth: The LSE Growth Commission Report

    The UK has failed to invest in key areas needed for long-term growth. How can we change this? Professor John Van Reenen, Director of CEP and co-chair of the LSE Growth Commission, presents a 'manifesto for growth' for the UK economy over the next 50 years, backed up by the Growth Commission's report.

    The interview was posted on You Tube on January 30, 2013
    Link to video here

    Related publications
    LSE Growth Commission Report - 'Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation', by Philippe Aghion, Timothy Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen, January 2013
    Download

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    LSE Growth Commission website

    Tuesday 08 January 2013

    City AM: Daft planning rules are pushing up the price of food in shops

    Once again, misguided rules are responsible for Britain's woes and for the excessively high prices that are hurting all of us - and the poor especially badly. As explained in an excellent paper by Paul Cheshire, Christian Hilber and Ioannis Kaplanis, published by the London School of Economics' spatial economics centre, planning policies, including the notorious ''town centre first'' ideology, have had a devastating impact on retailers' productivity - and thus pushed up the cost of food and goods sold by supermarkets.

    This article was published by City AM on January 8, 2013
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Land use planning: the impact on retail productivity, Paul Cheshire, Christian Hilber, Ioannis Kaplanis. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 1, Summer 2011
    'Evaluating the Effects of Planning Policies on the Retail Sector: Or do Town Centre First Policies Deliver the Goods?', Paul Cheshire, Christian A. L. Hilber and Ioannis Kaplanis, Spatial Economics Research Centre Discussion Paper No.66, January 2011

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Christian Hilber webpage
    SERC website

    Wednesday 31 October 2012

    The Financial Times: Heseltine's report is a return to an unsuccessful past

    In a review of the work "No Stone Unturned", Michael Hesetline's report on economic growth, Henry Overman remarks that it is an important and puzzling document. The UK economy, out of recession but still vulnerable, could do with some new ideas. Companies are demanding a clear plan from the coalition. However, from its Boy's Own introduction title ('One man's vision') to its 89 recommendations, Mr Heseltine's report is a plan that is more nostalgic than strategic.

    The article was published in the Financial Times on October 31, 2012
    Link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    SERC webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Thursday 27 September 2012

    SERC / Grantham Research Project Launched: An investigation of the Carbon Footprint of the Retail Sector

    New SERC/Grantham project launched: an investigation of the Carbon Footprint of the Retail Sector

    LSE's Spatial Economics Research Centre and Grantham Research Institute have begun a new collaborative project exploring the environmental effects of town centre first planning, and its impact on retail sector carbon footprints.

    Land use regulation policies shape the location and the size of retail sites in the UK. The justification for Town Centre First Policies (TCFP) when they were imposed in England in 1996 rested strongly on their supposed ability to facilitate ‘linked trips’ and a desire to retain access to shopping for poorer households without cars. The main supposed benefit, therefore was that TCFP was worthwhile because of environmental and distributional gains, i.e. town centre sites were the most “sustainable”. Based on the premise that town centres are the most accessible location for alternative (non-car) means of transport and reduce the need to travel, imposing TCFP was expected to reduce the carbon footprint of the retail sector and help make the distribution of real incomes fairer.

    In on-going work, Professor Paul Cheshire SERC and LSE Geography and Dr Christian Hilber (SERC and LSE Geography) are researching the implications of TCFP on the cost side, specifically, on the productivity of the retail sector The findings of this research suggest that both TCFP and more restrictive local application of planning policies impose substantial costs in terms of foregone output on the retail sector. This new SERC/Grantham project with Dr Rosa Sanchis-Guarner (SERC and Grantham) follows up by focusing on the claimed benefits of TCFP and rigorously evaluating them. The project aims to test if TCFP does in fact reduce the overall carbon footprint of retail. While TCFPs may facilitate ‘linked trips’ and make shopping trips without cars easier (the claimed benefits), there are a number of reasons to suspect that the overall carbon footprint effect of TCFP may be negative – the claimed benefits may be, in other words, another cost.

    First, even if TCFP has encouraged some substitution towards public transport, most consumers still use private cars to go shopping (according to the National Travel Survey, in 2010 around 65% of shopping trips in GB were done by car/van, 22% by foot and only 10% of shopping trips were done by local bus or rail). Second, given that population has continued to decentralise, shopping patterns could have been adversely affected if retail is forced to locate in town centres while consumers increasingly live out of town. Average shopping trips might have been made longer and almost certainly diverted to more congested conditions. More frequent and longer trips by car to congested town centres can have potential adverse effects on carbon emissions associated with shopping trips. Carbon emissions and other toxic gases can also have harmful effects on population health outcomes. Third, on the logistics side, while there are no potential offsetting gains from the increased use of public transport, access for deliveries will almost certainly have been made more congested, lorry sizes reduced and distances from distribution depots on the outskirts of towns accessible to the motorway network, increased. Moreover, more expensive space and smaller shop sizes reduces storage space within shops, increasing the frequency of deliveries. Finally, previous research has shown that one impact of TCFP was to reduce the rate of retail development and this is reflected in an aging retail estate. Older buildings are less energy efficient.

    Overall, therefore, the likely effects of TCFP on sustainability are unclear. The research of this project, using various datasets on shopping patterns, gas emissions and store energy use, aims to evaluate the effect of land use planning policies on the carbon footprint, emissions and energy use in the retail sector. Additionally, it also aims to analyse the effect of carbon emissions stemming from the retail sector on air pollution and population health outcomes. Finally, the carbon footprint effects of the emergence of internet shopping and how this affects traditional shopping trips (and their carbon footprint) would also be explored.

    The methodology aims to estimate causal effects, including the precise role of different land use policies on the carbon footprint of the retail sector. Subject to data availability we also aim to explore the related distributional effects of TCFP as well as potential substitution effects: consumers may choose to shop online to avoid congested and inconvenient shopping trips by public transport or foot to town centre retailers.

    For more details contact Dr Rosa Sanchis-Guarner.

    Thursday 13 September 2012

    Washington Post: France said to press Spain to seek aid over German concerns

    "The situation in Spain is not improving, there is really absolutely no benefit in waiting", Nobel laureate Christopher Pissarides, an economics professor at the London School of Economics, said in an interview with Bloomberg Television yesterday. "There isn't anything in the pipeline that will ease the situation".

    The article was published in the Washington Post on September 13, 2012
    Link to article

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage
    Christopher Pissarides CEP publications webpage

    Thursday 13 September 2012

    The Business: A tangible Olympic economic boost?

    Several of our essayists are likewise sceptical about the existence of clear economic and business benefits to Olympic host cities and countries. Max Nathan, research fellow with the Spatial Economics Research Centre, London School of Economics, writes that hoped-for impacts from job creation, transport improvement and inducements to healthier living usually turn out to be small. He also warns that it will take years for any lasting benefits to become clear.

    This article was published in The Business on September 13, 2012
    Link to article

    Related links
    Max Nathan webpage
    SERC website

    Friday 07 September 2012

    The Economist: Planning and greenery - Belt too tight

    Max Nathan, of the London School of Economics, notes that councils have few incentives to encourage development. If planning permission is granted, profits flow to developers and to central government, which collects most taxes. The costs - of extra infrastructure and so on - are mostly borne by the council. Existing residents, whose houses may lose value, are not compensated.

    This article appeared in the Economist on 7 September 2012 link to article

    Related Links
    Max Nathan webpage
    SERC website webpage

    Thursday 30 August 2012

    SERC News: Henry Overman appointed to help transform London's West End

    Professor Henry Overman Director of SERC has been appointed as one of the commissioners of the newly-formed West End Commission (WEC), set up to establish a blueprint for the future success of London's busiest area.

    Created in January 2012 by Westminster City Council's cabinet, the WEC aims to guide the future success of the West End and consider the challenges it faces. It will look into issues including transport, infrastructure, city management, safety and the promotion of business and visitor needs. It will also look at lessons from other cities both in the UK and abroad. The Commission will be holding regular evidence sessions, starting in October.

    Professor Overman joins a team of 12 experts from business, entertainment, transport and academia. The commission is headed by Manchester City Council chief executive Sir Howard Bernstein, and includes Professor Yvonne Rydin (UCL), Jim Steer (Steer Davis Gleave), David Partridge (Argent) and Greg Clark (OECD).

    More information is available at www.westendcommission.com. The public evidence sessions will also be webcast on the site.

    Related Links

    Professor Henry Overman's webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website



    Saturday 25 August 2012

    The Guardian: Bad advice turns poor students off university

    Professor Sandra McNally says myths surrounding tuition fees need to be debunked before inequalities in university access worsen.

    This article appeared in the Guardian on 25 August 2012 link to article

    Related publications
    Student Awareness of Costs and Benefits of Educational Decisions: Effects of an Information Campaign, Martin McGuigan, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.139, August 2012 link to article

    Related links
    Sandra McNally webpage
    Gill Wyness webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) website

    Friday 27 July 2012

    The Independent: Index of wellbeing: our duty to be perpetually happy

    The government has recently published the Index of Wellbeing, or rather the 'happiness index'. It was an attempt to measure the general happiness of the population and tailoring government policies to promote wellbeing and happiness. According to Professor Richard Layard, director of the Wellbeing programme at the LSE, this new index is a great step towards creating 'policy-making with wellbeing as a priority'. In other words, we all have a 'duty to be happy', and the government will enact policies to ensure this duty is realized.

    The article was published in The Independent on Friday 27 July, 2012
    Link to article

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Saturday 14 July 2012

    The Economist: Scourge of slums

    Good housing is obviously better than bad housing, but bad housing is better than none, and when the state gets into the business of licensing goods supply tends to fall. As Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, puts it, "schemes that restrict the ways in which we can use housing tend not to be beneficial to the poor. "

    The article was published in The Economist on July 14, 2012
    Link to article

    Related links
    Henry Overman webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    Sunday 08 July 2012

    The Sunday Times: Don't get mad, get help

    A report by the mental-health policy group at the London School of Economics (LSE) estimates that these disorders now account for nearly half of all ill health suffered by people in Britain. But does the deluge of celebrity sufferers mean that while awareness is raised, there is a risk that mentalhealth problems become so commonplace, we are being conditioned into thinking they are the norm?

    This article appeared in the Sunday Times on the 8 July 2012 link to article

    Related publications
    How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS A report by The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group. Published 18 June 2012
    Download the report here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Mental Health Policy Group webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    Sunday 08 July 2012

    The Sunday Times: Don't get mad, get help

    A report by the mental-health policy group at the London School of Economics (LSE) estimates that these disorders now account for nearly half of all ill health suffered by people in Britain. But does the deluge of celebrity sufferers mean that while awareness is raised, there is a risk that mentalhealth pro